Thick bones from strontium - a bad thing?

I've read that strontium improves bone density scores, but at what cost? Literature says strontium makes bones thicker. I read that this is not good and can cause fractures to happen more readily. Any more input?

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16 replies. Join the discussion

Just posted this morning. No replies, except yours.

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I read that before you have your scan you need to go off it for a certain amount of time a month but not sure or you could get false reading, but many women on the health forum seem to be saying it really helped there bone scores a whole lot..

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Hi

I take Strontium and not heard about the thickening nor do I see it as a side affect on the leaflet enclosed with the drug.

I switched form Boniva a bisphosphonate as that is studied to cause weakening of bones after 5 years due to the drug affecting old bone which the drug encourages the bones to hang onto and eventually that old bone weakens the bones.

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I take Strontium and would be very grateful to know the source of your information ?
Elinora

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My source is Save Our Bones by Vivian Goldschmidt. I wonder if there are others who confirm this.

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Thank you !
I do not feel confident emough t o follow her advice.Have you looked at her credentials? It would be interesting to know how others feel.
Elinora

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I agree and I'd love to hear from others on this subject.

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I just started it now I'm afraid to continue I heard it makes your bones heavier but not anything about fractures.

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See if you can do some research. I'm not positive about fractures, but it's talked about in Save Our Bones.

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Hi Nekawa

What is your concern having read the article?

lnrosebnty the link nekawa gave a few Posts back gives info. on Fractures in a double blind study which is encouraging.

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Stontium will give falsely higher bone density readings and the strontium will stay in the bones for years. If it turns out to be bad for you, you will be stuck with it in your bones for 10-20 years and nothing can be done to reverse it. Not that there is anything wrong with strontium that we know of. We thought that with bisphosphonates too.

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Osteoporosis drugs can be divided into three categories: antiresorptive drugs that slow bone breakdown (resorption), anabolic drugs that build new bone, and dual-action drugs that both slow bone resorption and build new bone.

Antiresorptive medications include bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and calcitonin. My opinion is that the antiresorptive drugs are flawed models as osteoporosis drugs. If we keep slowing bone breakdown without building new bone, we eventually end up with very old, weak bones. Long-term suppression of bone remodeling by Fosamax and other bisphosphonates has led to osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures in some patients.

Better models are bone-building (anabolic) drugs (i.e. Forteo) and dual-action agents (i.e. strontium ranelate, strontium citrate) that decrease bone breakdown and increase bone buildup.
http://strontiumforbones.blogspot.com/2011/09/antiresorptive-anabolic-and-d ual-action.html

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BoneLady,
What Calcium supplement do you take? What form of Calcium?

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The bones store calcium and that calcium has many other functions in the body such as nerve conduction, muscle contraction. I wonder if strontium can replace calcium in those other functions or could it prevent some of them from working correctly? Strontium may make the bones stronger but what other consequences might there be for the many calcium functions in the body? Dxa states the strontium stays in the bones for years so if none is released then maybe my concerns are unjustified. Maybe we all need some more information before we put strontium in our bones at all.

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nekawa,

For many years, I have been taking one tablet per day of KAL Calcium Magnesium Extra Strength, which contains 500 mg calcium (as calcium carbonate and calcium amino acid chelate), 250 mg magnesium (as magnesium oxide and magnesium amino acid chelate), 15 mg sodium, and 50 mg betaine HCl. I was buying it at my local health food store, but I found a replacement that I think is even better and will be ordering it soon from www.iherb.com, an online distributor I've been getting my strontium and a couple of other supplements from.

The new product is Country Life, Gluten Free, Calcium Magnesium Complex 1000 mg/500 mg in two tablets, 360 tablets, $20.23. The calcium is in the form of calcium hydroxyapatite, citrate, aspartate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and lysinate. The magnesium is in the form of magnesium oxide, citrate, taurinate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and aspartate. Each tablet contains 500 mg calcium, 250 mg magnesium, and 250 mg phosphorus (as calcium hydroxyapatite).

In addition to a calcium/magnesium supplement, I take a multivitamin, Nature Made Multi For Her 50+, which I buy online at www.walgreen.com when the company has one of their frequent “buy one, get one free” offers. This multivitamin contains 200 mg calcium, 100 mg magnesium, 1000 IU vitamin D3, 80 mcg vitamin K, and many other key nutrients.

For breakfast, I have 12 oz fat-free milk, which gives me 450 mg calcium. At lunch, I take the 500 mg calcium/250 mg magnesium supplement. With supper, I take my multivitamin for 200 mg calcium and 100 mg magnesium. That comes to 1150 mg calcium, without counting other food sources. The RDA for women 50+ is 1200 mg calcium per day. I’m glad you asked me this question. I may cut back to 8 oz milk on days when I know I’ll be having something calcium rich for supper.

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Inrosebnty,

A study of strontium ranelate by Y. Rolland et al found the following: At three years, the risk for vertebral fractures was reduced by 30% in the robust, by 45% in the intermediate, and by 58% in the frail patients compared to those assigned to placebo. Risk of vertebral fracture was reduced within one year in all three groups.

Read more about this study under the heading, "Strontium Ranelate And Risk Of Vertebral Fractures In Frail Osteoporotic Women", at
http://strontiumforbones.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-09-13T12:01:0 0-04:00&max-results=6

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