Looking for advice

My 5 yr old daughter got diagnosed with psoriasis about a month ago. After a dermatology visit and blood test she was put on an antibiotic because she tested positive for strep. Anyway, she's been on the antibiotic for 3 1/2 weeks and the spots are not going away. She has it every where from her scalp to her feet. The kids at school are starting to make comments and I don't know what to do. She is handling this very well for a five yr old I think but I just dread the day that she comes home upset because someone teased her at school and I am trying to prepare myself and her so that I can handle it the best I can and know what to tell her. Anyone been here??

Report post

11 replies. Join the discussion

Get her to a dermotologist. Psoriasis is an autoimune desease and you don't want it to get out of control.

Report post

She is seeing a pediatric dermatologist thats who put her on the antibiotic. It doesn't seem to be clearing it up she also has a topical ointment to use twice a day. We go back to the dr on the 8th of November.

Report post

My daughter was diagnosed at 5 as well. It got really bad when she was in first grade. I called the head of the elementary school and spoke with her about it - then I spoke to the teachers. This year, in third grade, it she is having another flare. I have spoken to the teachers and they (and my daughter) addressed it head on - so that the kids know what it is and that they can't catch it. I am in contact with the teachers a lot and they do their best to deal with any negative reactions they see (speaking about it publicly really helped). As for derms, I took my daughter to every ped. derm around and most of them are horrible treat it like a skin disease and not an auto-immune disease. They kept giving me steroid creams and it would get a bit better, then it would get much worse. If your child's case is mild enough that the topicals clear it up after 2 weeks and it doesn't come back it's an easy, cheap (insurance covers it) way to deal with it. But none of these have been tested on children. Where do you live? We ended up taking our daughter to the psoriasis clinic at NYU and they agreed that the steroid creams were detrimental and prescribed light therapy. You also might try to take her to a pediatric rheumatologist and/or GI doctor to see if there are any underlying triggers or related auto-immune issues (there often are). Also, look on here at some of the alternative therapies - they can be very helpful.

Report post

Thank you for the advice we live in Louisiana and the derm told us about the light therapy and also humira and told us we needed to research them and tell him at the next visit which one we wanted to try if the antibiotic didn't clear it.
The light box therapy seems like it would be hard to do because I would have to bring her two to three times a week and his office is an hour and fifteen minutes from where we live and I work full time and so does my husband so I just don't know. Also he said he wasn't sure if it would help with her p on her scalp which is where it bothers her the most. I guess I am just afraid to try anything on my own as far as alternatives because she's only five. She is a very strong child and it doesn't seem to bother her that the kids ask about it which is great. but it still bothers me because I dont want her to get hurt. You mentioned a GI to see about under lying things, I have crohns disease which affects my immune system could that be affecting her outbreaks if she has it too?

Report post

Very, very often crohns and psoriasis go together. So I would definitely take her to a pediatric GI specialist. We are in the process of investigating if our daughter may also have crohns. Humira carries a black box FDA warning and has not been tested on children. When one undergoes light therapy they also use a light brush for your head. As your child is young and you live far - your doctor could write you a prescription for an at home light box and brush - many insurance plans cover this. You might want to try that route if the current treatment doesn't work. Good luck.

Report post

Thank you so much.

Report post

Some patients will respond to antibiotics on the 1st outbreak, especially if they have a strep infection.

After 3.5 weeks with little change, I would revisit the pedi-derm and ask about the next step. Be aware that most pedi-derms are conservative in nature so you might hear about more antibiotics and/or topical therapies. If that is the doctor's limits, you will have to decide whether continue down this path or seek other opinions.

There are a variety of systemic approaches that work well in children. As you will soon learn, none of the systemic medications are approved for children and yes, most carry a 'black box warning'. That also doesn't mean that the risk/benefit ratio is unfavorable. If you feel you need to go to this next step, the most important thing to do is find a dermatologist who has experience in treating widespread psoriasis using systemic medications in children. That person might not be a pedi-derm.

Good luck with your daughter.

Report post

I was reviewing the details of your daughter's situation. It's sad she has to deal with a major systemic auto-immune problem at such an early age because her immune system is still very vulnerable. I speak from 36 yrs of AS, PsA and very severe Ps (top 2% nationally). Long term use of antibiotics at her age is not advisable. Biologics are also problematic as is long-term use of light therapy (skin cancer). From what you've reported, there is probably a genetic component to your daughter's situation. Crohn's Disease is an auto-immune illness very closely related to Ps (PsA as well). Others have corectly raised the issues of using steroid-based treatments. I would strongly suggest seeking treatment for your daughter at a university-based clinic/center/hospital, while not foreclosing alternative ideas. And do include a pediatric rhematologist, the severity of your daughter's Ps indicates it is not run-of-the-mill psorasis and will, most probably, produce other issues (PsA, etc.) in the near future. Unfortunately, a quick Google search did not disclose noted pediatric rheumatologists in Louisana, so you may need to consider Texas Children's Hospital or a similar medical center in Atlanta or Arkansas. Perserverence now will pay big dividends for your daughter's future. Good Luck.

Report post

If your heart and gut tells you to try another doctor, do it. I have found (since 1972) most of the doctors don't really care. I would take your daughter to a hospital and see the head of pediatric derm.

Report post

I would also look into treating her with glycerin. I learned about it through discussions on this website, and have used it to treat my 7 year old daughter since last May (she has inverse p, but glycerin works on plaque p too, I believe. There is a LOT of great info about it on discussions through this site. It takes 2 or 3 months to clear up, but it is amazing AND it eliminates the burning and itching that my daughter was experiencing (prescription creams and ointments from the dermatologist were not working, AND they come with side effects).

I wish you all the best - I know how hard it is to see your child suffering - and teased because of this problem.

Report post

Hi Bhano84,
I am so sorry to hear this, I can’t imagine how it is for her seeing as she is so young, If you check my other posts (link below) I have made good progress and if I can give you what I consider the best I know from my experience it will be this. Medical Dr’s are not upfront about how little they know about Psoriasis. If you have combed through this community I am sure you will gather that there are a number of us all who believe that diet has a major effect on this disease. My advice is to clean up her diet ( I know it will be hard at first) and then pursue light treatments through narrow band UVB. I know that there is a long term risk of skin cancer ( I’ll accept as the lesser of two evils) but I personally refuse to let anyone suppress my immune system through biologics.
It took me years to figure out a simple understanding of what’s happening in my body and I’ll give it to you now.
It’s not her skin that has the issue it’s her immune system, what is happening is that her immune system has started mass producing T-Cells (normally for fighting infection etc) and they are grouping in clumps under her skin in random places, this is what “super charges” her normal skin cells and makes them replicate 10x faster. So her skin is actually fine and will return to normal once these T-Cells are killed or die off. Light therapy (narrow band UVB) kills them but there is no sense in starting it until you get her immune system to calm itself. If you can afford it, go to a Dr. who is willing to test her “inflammatory marker” I’ll bet money that it’s high, it can be naturally lowered with fish oils, they will recommend other supplements like vitamin D etc. but most of them are oils and can be put in her food. I am assuming the antibiotic you are referring to is strictly for the strep infection? I have never heard of anyone treating P with that but you may want to consider getting her some probiotics (good bacteria) to help heal the gut. I hope this helps you...
My “progress” post : http://www.inspire.com/groups/talk-psoriasis/discussion/my-progress-clear/
My “theory” post is here : http://www.inspire.com/groups/talk-psoriasis/discussion/crossed-the-line-to -insanity/

Report post

This discussion is closed to replies. We close all discussions after 90 days.

If there's something you'd like to discuss, click below to start a new discussion.

Things you can do

Support the National Psoriasis Foundation

Help the National Psoriasis Foundation reach its goals and support people like yourself by making a donation today.

Donate to the National Psoriasis Foundation

Discussion topics

Additional resources

Community leaders