6 Year Old has P.

** Originally posted by michdoyle **

My son who as a baby as had skin problems and we were always told it was eczema and he would grow out of it. About two years ago he started to develop the callus like sores on his knees and this year he has start developing red sores (for lack of a better word) on his shins. We started seeing an allergies and I asked him to look at my sons legs and he said "oh yeah that is p." and referred us to a derma. how confirm that is it p.Over the past few years off and on he would cry his knees where hurting him but we were told these were just growing pains. This past week he started limping and saying his ankle hurt. And it looked a little swollen but it was actually the two ankle bones that stick out that look bigger not so much around the ankle. So we took him in thinking maybe he injured himself in soccer (he is very active) The ped. said it is not an injury and ordered alot of blood work. I think it was around 5 or 6 tubes. And then last night and this morning he is complaining that his pinky toe on the same leg is really hurting him...I am concerned it could be PA..But this whole disease in new to me and I feel very overwhelmed. We are waiting for the blood test to come in. But honestly I am not even sure what they tested him for.

I am also waiting the for derma to call back and give me the name of the ped. rrheumatologist in our area and get him in to see him too. Is there anything else i can do?

Report post

12 replies. Join the discussion

** Originally posted by Emsmom **

For achy joints, a warm bath can be very helpful. So can using a rice sock. To make one just fill a tube sock 3/4 or so full with uncooked rice and sew the end of the sock shut. Heat it in the microwave until warm~~ be careful not to make it too hot. Then place it on or around the painful joints. Rice socks hold up well and are much less expensive than store bought microwavable things.
As for finding a pediatric rheumatologist, where do you live? If you're in the US I can help you find the names of the closest one to you.
Just an FYI~~ perfectly normal bloodwork in a child does not guarantee that the child does not have arthritis, so seeing a rheumatologist will be important even if the bloodwork is perfect.

Liz

Report post

** Originally posted by MikeK **

Hi michdoyle,

Welcome to the board. :cool: Nice to meet you.

I'm sorry to read that you're son is hurting and that his pediatrician is exploring the possibility of PA. :(

As Liz said, normal bloodwork in a child does not rule out the possibility that the child doesn't have arthritis. That said, I'm going to give you a link to a "must read" post by JesseLou (circa 2004); she discusses the questions that must be asked and the tests that must be ordered whenever PA is suspected. The post is from an adult's point of view, but some of the tests might be helpful in the case of a child. Here's a link to Her post: http://talkpsoriasis.org/showthread.php?p=74786&highlight=question. In the case of an adult, an Anti-CCP test is helpful in diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis: http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/ccp/test.html.

I echo Liz's suggestion that you see a pediatric rheumatologist. Hopefully, she knows the name of someone in your area. You can also find a pediatric rheumatologist via the American College of Rheumatology's website (select the pediatric option): http://www.rheumatology.org/directory/geo.asp.

Liz's suggestion about using rice socks is an excellent idea. Some joints respond better to ice packs and some joints respond to alternate use of heat and ice.

I hope this helps.

Good luck.

Keep us posted! Let us know if you have any other questions and please don't be a stranger.

Mike

Report post

** Originally posted by michdoyle **

Thank you for the advise! We live in Toledo OH. The ped did call and everything did come back normal they are mailing me the results so that i can take them to a rheum. I am so happy things were normal but wonder what is causeing his pain. He is having a better day today....I will keep you posted!


Thanks Again!

Report post

** Originally posted by MikeK **

You're very, welcome. I'm glad that we were able to help.

Joint pain can be a symptom of Lyme disease, so that possibility should also be explored:

After several months, approximately 60% of patients with untreated infection will begin to have intermittent bouts of arthritis, with severe joint pain and swelling. Large joints are most often affected, particularly the knees.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Lyme/ld_humandisease_symptoms.htm.

Joint pain can also sometimes be associated with a form of Hypothyroidism called Hashimoto's disease: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=sympto ms so I always suggest that people explore that possibility.

I hope you get some answers soon.

I hope your son feels better soon.

Good luck. Keep us posted. Let us know if you have any other questions and please don't be a stranger.

Mike

Report post

** Originally posted by Emsmom **

I'm glad your pediatrician is still referring your son to a rheumatologist. Do you know yet who you will be seeing? Do you have to wait long for an appointment? There is such a shortage of pediatric rheumatologists in this country that it is not unusual to wait a minimum of 6 weeks for an appointment.
Let us know what happens.

Liz

Report post

** Originally posted by michdoyle **

emsmom, the ped did not refer...which upsets me of course they are the ones who said he will grow out of this. I am taking him anyway. Luckly, I don't have to have a referral on my insurance. We did find a Ped Rheum in Toledo her name is Dr. Smukler, but we can't get in until May. So we will see what happens from here. Thank you for all the advise and hopefully it is not PA! Take care and I will keep you posted after his appointment. Let's prayer we stay uneventful until his appointment!

Michelle

Report post

** Originally posted by Emsmom **

Hi Michelle,
Are you sure that Dr Smukler is certified in pediatrics/pediatric rheumatology? I ask because there are some very kind (thank goodness!!) rheumatologists out there who agree to see children in communities where there are no pediatric rheumatologists. I went to the American College of Rheumatology's website (http://www.rheumatology.org) and clicked on "find a member" at the top of the screen. I clicked on Ohio and then, under filters, on Pediatric. There was not even a listing for anyone in Toledo. When I went back and removed "pediatric" from the search I then found Dr Smukler.
Please understand that I am not suggesting that Dr Smukler is not qualified to see your child. I am suggesting, however, that you make sure you are seeing a board certified pediatric rheumatologist at least for the initial appointment.
I apologize if I've overstepped. We've just been dealing with this for so many years and my comments are based on our experiences and those of other kids we know.

Liz

Report post

** Originally posted by michdoyle **

Hi Michelle,
Are you sure that Dr Smukler is certified in pediatrics/pediatric rheumatology? I ask because there are some very kind (thank goodness!!) rheumatologists out there who agree to see children in communities where there are no pediatric rheumatologists. I went to the American College of Rheumatology's website (http://www.rheumatology.org) and clicked on "find a member" at the top of the screen. I clicked on Ohio and then, under filters, on Pediatric. There was not even a listing for anyone in Toledo. When I went back and removed "pediatric" from the search I then found Dr Smukler.
Please understand that I am not suggesting that Dr Smukler is not qualified to see your child. I am suggesting, however, that you make sure you are seeing a board certified pediatric rheumatologist at least for the initial appointment.
I apologize if I've overstepped. We've just been dealing with this for so many years and my comments are based on our experiences and those of other kids we know.

Liz

Hi Liz,
Yes, I did talk with his allergist and he did say she is not a pediatric rheum but sees children. Thank you for the advise. He is having pains in different spots. Is that normal? He woke up Easter morning with back pain in his lower back (he was walking like he was stiff) then he was fine for awhile. Then when we were at an Easter egg hunt he kept complaining his back hurt when he bent down..What 6 year old get back pain from picking up eggs!!! Don't get me wrong it didn't stop him and he didn't cry but he mentioned it about 5 times that it hurt. It's really hard when everyone (Doctors) don't seem to think it's a big deal. I don't know what to think, we are now on an HSA which stinks so I hate paying and not getting answers!

Report post

** Originally posted by Emsmom **

Hi Michelle,
I think it is fairly common for pain to travel in our kids. Also, the kids do get used to the pain and learn not to let it stop them which could explain why your son just kept going on Easter. And it IS a big deal. Six year olds just don't normally walk like they are stiff and complain of back pain. It always irks me when I hear that a physician considers it to not be a big deal.
Have you given any more thought to going to Cincinnati or another children's hospital? Sometimes a pediatric specialist will catch what others have been missing. Either way, I hope that you get answers sooner rather than later.
Liz

Report post

** Originally posted by michdoyle **

Yes, I am going to go ahead and take him to Dr. Smukler and see what she has to say..I have a long list of questions! And go from there. I will see who she recommends etc...I will let you know after our appointment what happens. Thank you so much for the advise, I really needed validation that I am not over reacting and you all have helped me realize that Doctors don't know everything and I need to take my son's health in to my hands and let them tell me everything is fine when I know it is not.

Liz, What is your story if you don't mind me asking? Does your daughter have PA? You don't have to answer if you don't want or you can PM me if you want. I am just curious of your experiance with this diesese and how it has effected your life..

Michelle

Report post

** Originally posted by Emsmom **

Michelle,
My daughter was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis back in late 1994 when she was 2 years old. A couple of years later we relocated and she had to start seeing a new rheumatologist. He commented about the dactylitis (sausage digit) that had been there from onset and was the first person to mention psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. At that time, however, she did not have psoriasis nor was there any known family history of psoriasis. It was not until 2006 that my daughter was diagnosed with psoriasis. I received my diagnosis of psoriasis within weeks of her diagnosis~~ probably because her diagnosis prompted me to ask the dermatologist about my skin. At any rate, when she was diagnosed with psoriasis her rheumatologist told us that he believes, based on both disease pattern and damage, that Emily has overlapping forms of arthritis rather than just one type.
You asked how it has impacted our lives. Well, on the downside, there have been things we haven't done as a family because Emily would not have been able to participate. There have been lots of medications, medical appointments, blood draws, physical therapy. At the same time, we have all become stronger because of Emily's health. We have learned to adapt when we needed to adapt. And we have watched all of our other children become more compassionate because of their exposure to Emily and other kids with chronic health issues. We've learned to appreciate the really good days and to enjoy those days that needed to be spent more quietly. We have also met some amazing people, kids and adults alike, because of this. Most are people we'd never have met if not for Emily's health. Basically, we've learned the importance of making lemonade out of lemons. That doesn't mean it's been easy. We've had many years to come to term with all of this and to learn how best to handle it for our family. The most important thing you need to know is that if your son does indeed have arthritis it is not life ending. There are so many more treatment options available now than when Emily was diagnosed. And kids with arthritis can be active, happy, productive people. Emily has played clarinet in the band, played the guitar, been on soccer teams and been a pole vaulter on her high school track team. She has gotten an academic letter (4.0 or better gpa), is a member of the National Honor Society and has been awarded a merit scholarship at the university she will be attending next fall. All this in spite of arthritis and some of its complications. I hope that in knowing Emily's story you will find hope for your son if the diagnosis is arthritis.
Please don't hesitate to contact me if I can be of any help.
Liz

Report post

** Originally posted by tysmom **

Hi Michelle,
I am sorry to hear about your little one. I hope that your son does not have PsA but if he does, you have come to the right place for support and information. This board is full of caring people who always respond with comforting words. My son, who is 19, was diagnosed with PsA back in Dec. At first he complained of pain in his elbow which we were told was tennis elbow. Not until 2 other joints started to swell did we think something else was going on. We had never heard of PsA before. At this point, Tyler is doing well. He has taken 4 shots of Enbrel and it is definitely working. He goes back to the rheumy in 2 weeks so we'll see how his blood work looks. If you ever have any questions or just want to vent, don't hesitate! Best of luck to your son and please keep us posted.
Tina

Report post

This discussion is closed to replies. We close all discussions after 90 days.

If there's something you'd like to discuss, click below to start a new discussion.

Things you can do

Support the National Psoriasis Foundation

Help the National Psoriasis Foundation reach its goals and support people like yourself by making a donation today.

Donate to the National Psoriasis Foundation

Discussion topics

Additional resources

Community leaders