Off topic Autism

Hi All;
My doctor has always said."It's all in the gut" meaning we are the ones that screw up our immune systems by what we eat in most diseases.After watching this program I now really understand what she means.I just thought you might be interested in this as we all know someone that has an autistic child.
http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episode/autism-enigma.html

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I will be sure to take a look at this. Interestingly, when I told my chiropractor of my Systemic Scleroderma diagnosis, her comment was "dead gut." Thanks!

lumi

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Thanks Christine-2, Makes me feel like this last doc we seen really is on the right track.

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Christine-2,

I haven't seen the episode yet (I will definitely watch it later when I have more time), but I did read the description of it and I am quite familiar with the "leaky gut" hypothesis regarding autism and autoimmune disease. As well as having scleroderma myself, I have a son with autism (Asperger's more specifically) so of course these theories are very interesting to me.

In all honesty, I don't buy into the leaky gut hypothesis of autism - at least not in the case of my own son. He doesn't have gastrointestinal issues or known allergies, though he does have eczema and is a very picky eater. He was exclusively breastfed and started to show some signs of autism very early on, well before he started eating solid food. I also don't believe that vaccines played any role in my son's condition - we did have him vaccinated following the Canadian guidelines, but we had delayed the MMR vaccine (for other reasons) and he started showing signs of autism well before receiving it and did not worsen afterwards either. In his case, I believe strongly that his condition is genetically based and not environmentally caused.

Could there be several causes of autism? Yes, absolutely. I'm not saying that these ideas of leaky gut, vaccine injury, heavy metal toxicity, or bacterial infection are wrong... just that they do not make sense to me when I consider my own child's health and development. I have some friends who strongly believe that their child was negatively affected by vaccine preservatives, and these are intelligent people who have read a lot and thought about their child's development and simply come to a different conclusion than I have. I respect that totally, and I am very interested in seeing whether there is any progress made in understanding the causes of autism during my lifetime.

Also, we are in the middle of eliminating the most common food allergens from our family's diet (starting with gluten and dairy) and I will be curious to see whether it has any effect on my son's behaviour. We're not doing it specifically for that reason though. I should add that my son has a form of high-functioning autism called Asperger's Syndrome and he is able to live an essentially normal life. I think if he were more severely affected I would have pursued dietary changes or food allergy/intolerance when he was younger to see if it would have made a difference. He will be turning 7 soon.

I will certainly watch the program you linked to - thanks!

Zoe

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Hi Zoe;
This was super interesting.The little boy that you will see at the beginning had an unknown sesitivety to milk which somehow led to an ear infection.He was given too many courses of antibiotics and developed the Autism.Strangely it was an other antibiotic,vancomycin,that helped him.For the life of me I can't understand doctors that give you a prescription for antibiotics without telling you that you need probiotics to counter their effect.SHEEEEEESH!

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We have wondered whether our son could have a sensitivity to either gluten or dairy. Like I said, I do truly believe that his autism is genetic, but I wonder about whether diet plays a role in behaviour. I have heard many times that a parent took her child off of some common allergenic foods and saw a tremendous difference. The diet advocated for autism and ADHD is usually free of gluten and casein. We are removing gluten, dairy, and refined sugar in the hopes that it will improve my heakth (re. autoimmune disease) and possibly help our son as well, and also our middle daughter who suffers from frequent tummy aches and mysterious outbreaks of hives. Thankfully my husband and youngest child are totally healthy!

Our son has had many rounds of antibiotics for chronic ear infections and no, we were never told to give him probiotics! I didn't even know probiotics existed until recently after I'd become ill and started reading and thinking a lot more about health issues. As well as the ear infections, my son has eczema so I have questioned the possibility of a milk intolerance... we'll see!

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There is a book on the gaps diet call Gut &Psychology Syndrome by Dr Natasha Campbell. It talks about Autism and Adhd how diet change can help with these. It's a very expensive bookto buy. I took it out from the libray. Need to take it out again.

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Zoe123, my daughter who has down syndrome also is autistic. My daughter, tests "off the charts" so to speak for celiac. She also had chronic ear infections when she was growing up. Although I didn't give her probiotics at the time I would always load her up on yogurt. She does have some skin issues. Celiac is so common in D.S. that our down syndrome clinic routinely checks for it. the other interesting thing they seem to be finding is they don't seem to respond to a G-free diet. I was crazy obsessed with gluten after she was diagnosed and watched every bite she ate. When she was re tested a year later she actually came back worse. People with D.S. Also have a tendency to have high ANA's. The Dr.s at the Down syndrome clinic (in AR) have no answers but are trying to gather enough info to maybe find some answers.

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Also I've heard alternative dr.s for years say it all starts in the gut- who knows

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