PEMF for Osteoporosis?

Dear Forum,
This is Pulsed Electromagentic Field treatment. It is usually a pad with coils imbedded that you sleep on, and a programming box sends a programmed series of magnetic pulses through your body. They are very low level, so no danger like from power lines. They are proven to accelerate bone fracture healing, so why not osteoporosis? It supposedly works, but I am not sure it is worth the price. Then again, We spend thousands of dollars total on our regular treatments. Maybe there is a reasonable priced system? Has anyone looked into this?
Thanks!
Mike

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You asked if there is a problem to use the device with metal, he said, iys ok to use.I understood its ok to use with metal dental implants. Nancy

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OsteoMike,

Thanks for your most interesting info. I have been looking further into the PEMF as compared to TENS and found this summary of NASA research in my travels. It explains how the PEMF works ( no mention of TENS):

http://www.pulsed-electromagnetic-therapy.com/pemf-science/nasa-study/

This caught my eye:

•ACCELERATED CELL GROWTH•BETTER ORGANIZED CELL MORPHOLOGY•UPREGULATION OF GENES RELATED TO COLLAGEN PRODUCTION

So I read on.

The actual full document from NASA itself is found by following their link at bottom of page.

In that link, page 24 onwards, see the list of the upregulated and down regulated genes resulting from the use of this method. To my layman's mind, it looks like major meddling reading down those lists. I'd like to have those analysed by someone with an idea of what might also occur as a result of long time usage. It's also worrying that in these lists there are unidentified genes that have been down regulated and up regulated.

I haven't read the whole paper, just scanned it, so maybe with more detailed perusal those fears may be allayed. It is interesting to see the depth of genetic research undertaken. Wouldn't it be wonderful if this technology were found to be the answer indeed, to many diseases and illnesses.

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From Wikipedia:
Up-regulation and down-regulation
Up-regulation is a process that occurs within a cell triggered by a signal (originating internal or external to the cell), which results in increased expression of one or more genes and as a result the protein(s) encoded by those genes. On the converse, down-regulation is a process resulting in decreased gene and corresponding protein expression.
Up-regulation occurs, for example, when a cell is deficient in some kind of receptor. In this case, more receptor protein is synthesized and transported to the membrane of the cell and, thus, the sensitivity of the cell is brought back to normal, reestablishing homeostasis.
Down-regulation occurs, for example, when a cell is overstimulated by a neurotransmitter, hormone, or drug for a prolonged period of time, and the expression of the receptor protein is decreased in order to protect the cell (see also tachyphylaxis).

Humm; This does sound concerning. I wonder what Dr Oz would say? Do you know of anyone to ask?

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Mike,

I think AussieLass is concerned that the prolonged action on cells may actually throw the genes and proteins out of kilter rather than self aligning them. When she gets up she can tell me if I'm all wet! I wonder if there's still someone home at NASA that was involved. I know the current admin has been de-funding them. I guess I share her concern, as that sounds like the stuff that affects cancer and other ailments.

It could be misleading because I think the wiki descriptions are in the context of normal body activities, not an "abnormal" external influence. I could be off base here, just my 2 cents.

Tom

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Nancy,

I got the opposite impression. Sounded like he said NO (not okay to use with imbedded metal).

I would think it's similar to MRI? Of course they can take an mri with imbedded metal, but the resulting films are distorted by them. It would be nice to know why it's not okay if that's the case. It's easier to understand and remember things if we know the why.

Tom

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Tom I just got an email from the company:
Dear Nancy Lee,

Yes, you can use the BioMedici therapy device for treatment! The
BioMedici sends out bio-magnetic impulses it is NOT a magnet!
We have thousands of customers with medical body replacement parts
that use the BioMedici with great therapy success, especially after
such procedures to eliminate pain and inflammation.

Kind regards, Friederika
Biotransmed

On 4/22/12, Nancy Lee <nandas1@msn.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hello I want to order the product but I have a question. I had hip fracture
> last december and docor put a metal plate on my hip, can I use your product
> with metal implant? ThanksNancy Lee

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Tom, I just ordered the BioMedici device, I will let yall know after I use it.

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Hey Tom, Nancy O and all of you.
Where do I order an Eath Pulse and how much does it cost?
Does insurance cover any of the costs?
I watched the Dr. Oz video and have read all of your comments as I sit here with my TENS machine blasting away on my back.
Can this therapy be real? Please, let it be so.
I would appreciate some info. Thank you.
Em

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EathPulse costs $600 here is the link:http://www.earthpulsetechnologies.com/

The one I ordered is BioMedici it costs 158.00 dolares including shipping. Here is the link:http://www.magnetictherapycure.com/index.html

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Hi Em,

Good grief, you are everywhere! I'm glad to see you're willing to become a "guinea piglet" in the interest of science. I hope you will find something that will improve your quality of life.

My wife had shoulder surgery a week ago and her PT just told us that takes 3 months to heal! Sure was a blow to her fishing plans. Keeps me busy just being her "left arm". Well at least the weather is improving here. Take care.

Tom

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I am willing to be a guinea pig too, I ordered my BioMedici machine and after I use I will let you know, but I think its good. all the best to all of you nancy

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Tom, thank you,

Yes, my concerns were with the long term changes in gene expression and the implications of those especially when there were unidentified genes being affected.

OsteoMike,

I researched "Dr Oz and PEMF" on Google and it led to so much info, thank you. There are thousands of studies on PEMF.

http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/pulsed-electromagnetic-fields-how-they-heal

"PEMFs have been used extensively for decades for many conditions and medical disciplines, and results can be seen in animals as well as humans. The National Institutes of Health have made PEMFs a priority for research. In fact, many PEMF devices have already been approved by the FDA, some specifically to fuse broken bones, wound healing, pain and tissue swelling, and treat depression. Most therapeutic PEMF devices are considered safe by various standards and organizations"

Here's a 2011 review:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21669132

Stimulation of bone formation and fracture healing with pulsed electromagnetic fields: biologic responses and clinical implications.
Chalidis B, Sachinis N, Assiotis A, Maccauro G.
SourceInterbalkan Medical Center, Orthopaedic Department, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Abstract
Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been used for several years to supplement bone healing. However, the mode of action of this non-invasive method is still debated and quantification of its effect on fracture healing is widely varied. At cellular and molecular level, PEMF has been advocated to promote the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins and exert a direct effect on the production of proteins that regulate gene transcription. Electromagnetic fields may also affect several membrane receptors and stimulate osteoblasts to secrete several growth factors such as bone morphogenic proteins 2 and 4 and TGF-beta. They could also accelerate intramedullary angiogenesis and improve the load to failure and stiffness of the bone. Although healing rates have been reported in up to 87 % of delayed unions and non-unions, the efficacy of the method is significantly varied while patient or fracture related variables could not be clearly associated with a successful outcome.

PMID:21669132[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

There's so much more out there which can be accessed by following the leads in these links.

Bottom line is, devices have been used for c 20 years. Some are FDA approved (how much weight does that carry?). Efficacy varies but looks promising. As usual when evaluating any strategy for overcoming osteoporosis the individual variables will always mean one size does not fit all, so maybe we should not see the variation in efficacy as a reason for skepticism.

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Yup, Tom; I am everywhere...always willing to learn...however, if this is FDA approved, I should be able to get the insurance to help out with the costs. ( why is beiing ill so expensive?)
I am going to keep tabs on the folks who are trying it already. I see my pain Dr. in 3 weeks, I will print out all info and see what he thinks and if I can get an RX.
My damn back hurts so much that I'd eat chicken poop if it stopped the pain!
Dr. Oz seems ( SEEMS) like he is for real, so we shall see.
Sorry your wife is having so much trouble with her health. It seems none of us can count on just having a normal life.
Keep smiling all and keep us all posted on the PEMF.
Thank you.
Em

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Just joined this discussion. For those of us with daily pain this is very interesting. I think I share Aussielass and Tom's concern about the NASA long list of genes affected by magnetism. On the other hand it looks as though there is evidence it helps with bone healing. However this phrase that magnetic fields "stimulate osteoblasts to secrete several growth factors" bothers me. Anybody who has had cancer or has a precancerous condition might not want cell growth factors stimulated. Tom, as an EE, would not the TENS electrical pulses generate a magnetic field? It has been a long time since I took physics so maybe I don't understand this very well!

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Okiept,

No the TENS uses electrical impulses applied directly to the skin by stick-on electrodes. There would not be any significant magnetic field from a TENS, because the electrical pulses are of such a low level. They have to be very low,else they would shock the patient - not a good thing!

We used to hear things from environmentalist types that overhead transmission lines were negatively affecting the health of humans living under them. I hope there isn't any substance to that rumor. Oh well, I also hope that the small amount of RF energy from cell phones won't turn our grandkids into monsters too.

Tom

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Thanks Tom

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Tom,

Re the effect of overhead transmission lines, here in Australia there is a real concern for that problem and you'll never find housing built under those these days. I seem to recall leukemia being associated with that scenario. Public perception here is that those lines are dangerous.

Re cancer and PEMF there are claims that PEMF reduces/cures some forms of cancers. Lots of that on Google.

Here's a Wall Street Journal article on effect on brain tumours of an ELECTRICAL field. (Not PEMF) Promising?

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703303904575292691538647642.h tml

Re the TENS machine I am still looking for the reason that THAT technology had facilitated bone union. I had wondered whether it was purely the vibration (felt) when using the device. NASA looked at vibration platforms to increase bone density. There was a study with sheep which was promising. Here's 2001 review:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2001/ast02nov_1/

Some quotes:

"Although the vibrations are subtle they have had a profound effect on bone loss in laboratory animals such as turkeys, sheep, and rats."

The conclusions here re humans are cautious but promising.

Vibration platforms (Juvent especially) have been discussed extensively on this site.

Here's a 2011 review of literature: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22238804

Bottom line: "Claims about whole-body vibration therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis cannot be made without further research." So the jury is still out on that one it seems. Hasn't been dismissed tho'! Some members on this site have used THESE devices. (The intensity of the vibration is a crucial caution).

When doing the reading, it's always difficult to get past the profit-making hype on one hand and in the other direction, the resistance to promising alternative therapies. I'll keep researching these ideas.

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Lots of good information being shared. Thanks everyone!
With all of the research that's been done, I am surprised that it is so unknown and unused. Do you think the drug companies are the reason?
With people trying different machines and technologies, perhaps we will get some good information for others to come. It seems this has a lot of potential. The only problem is that it takes a while to see results, and the testing is not cheap! I did run across a bone marker test that is not so bad:
http://www.sunrisewd.com/new_site/products/bl_restore.html
Best!
Mike

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AussieLass,

Very interesting on the transmission lines causing leukemia! Sounds like your government and/or construction industry is more logical than ours in the US. Better to be safe than sorry. You've done some very good research and I thank you for sharing with us. These areas of bone stimulation certainly bear watching. Take care.

Tom

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Hi all;
I lived in California for over 25 years and many times had the electric company come out to check the safety levels of homes near the Hi wire towers.
Several tested above the safety limit and those homes were impossible to sell with full disclosure laws.
It was mentioned that leukemia was found in a higher than normal percentage of children who grew up living close to the towers.
Also, playgrounds near towers became unsafe for use.
Interesting, huh?
Em

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