Receeding gums and EDS III

Hello Everyone,
My father and older sister both have severly recessive gums (without gingivitis, etc). My father lost virtually all his teeth due to this and my sister (who is mid-60s) is having another gum grafting surgery soon. Her gum sugeries began when she was in her early twenties. My sister doesn't have many EDS signs, but I'm sure I inherited through my father and believe this is a connective tissue problem. Any thoughts?

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One more piece of information: When my son (who is only mildly affected) was getting his baby teeth, his top front teeth came in missing enamel. The pediatric dentist said it was some glitch in his development, but I wonder if anyone else had this/saw this in themselves or their children...

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i remember from my daughter's younger daysthat white spots can happen from flouride applications along with flouridated toothpaste. or i guess it could be irregular incorporation of calcium into the tooth structure. it wasn't a problem for my daughter and went away eventually.

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i forgot to mention that while brushing in very small circles or in one place, you push the brush onto the tooth and gum. this gets the bristles into the areas between teeth and massages the gums and gets some bristles flared out under the gumline. this breaks up plaque in hidden spots and the massaging strengthens the gums.

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my gums have been receding for a long time due to eds. i am 65 now. teeth have a different connective tissue like bone and aren't affected by eds i believe. brushing properly with a softer brush and using very small circles or just keeping the brush in one place and wiggling it in a circular fashion and using floss or water pik help(neither of which i do regularly-i use a toothpick a lot). i have had no cavities at gumline since a dentist taught me how to brush properly (35 years ago) and my current dentist says i have excellent gum health-i have no bleeding and have had no gingivitis. but the exposure is getting closeto the roots in a couple areas. luckily i have had some cracks developing or cavities under old fillings so i have gotten some crowns on molars which end up covering the exposed areas by the gums. another problem is that when the gums recede to a certain point but still above the root, you are brushing on softer tooth material which erodes. i am guessing that you can get overlays for the eroding softer areas, but maybe they only do them if you have a cavity or erosion almost to the root nerve.

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Same here. My gums have always been this way and they have always blamed me for it.

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I have receeding gums also. Years ago my dentist told me it was because I should use soft toothbrushes and brush gently. Well, I did and I do and nothing has change. My gums no longer bleed because my teeth are looser and further apart, not enough to notice but I can tell when I'm flossing, it's easier to get the floss in and out. I have the lines in my teeth too.

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My son is 11 and he has frequent bleeding with brushing. He also has a few white spots on his teeth. He also has crowded, crooked teeth. He also has severe allergies (being treated) and sleeps with his mouth open. I am assuming that this is all due to EDS, although we don't have the official diagnosis yet. As soon as we do, we will pursue treatment with a knowledgeable dentist and orthodontist.

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i have EDS 3 and have always used soft brushes etc... but i needed gum flaps at about 30yo, and in my forties am struggling with nerve exposure despite now stable gums (= pain, so a bummer!). BUT: i have never had any cavities!

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I'm 53, I have increasingly receeding gums, not too severe yet, began to notice this about 15 years ago, the dentist kept telling me to use a soft toothbrush and floss, which I do 2x/day... have slight bleeding, teeth a bit crowded, had one molar crack and break at a filling, and my front teeth are scored horizontally, the dentist insists it is from brushing incorrectly, I disagree! and tell him I believe it is from being forced to breathe with my mouth open due to severe allergies, the grooves seem to form where my lip doesn't cover the tooth if that makes sense. I have several have fillings at the gumline for now to cover the nerve root.

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My father had periodontal surgery in his forties and I have lost my uppers due to grinding (TMJ) and receeding gum (no gingivitis) also in my forties. It is my understanding that gum issues and cracked/broken teeth are common in EDSers due to the connective tissue and TMJ issues.

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