Avoiding Soy

I was told by my Nutritionist and Onc. to steer clear of soy and soy containing products, I'm er+.
the problem I'm having is knowing just how far away I'm suppose to stay. Soy is in so many products, which ones or what amount am I to stay under? Has anyone else been told something like this?

Thanks all,
Lorraine

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Good question, as I have stopped eating meat and have tofu dishes several times per week. My understanding was that eating it occasionally was OK, but never to supplement. I will ask my onc on Thursday for clarification, as I need to know this too.

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I never pay attention to staying away from anything. I am in my 17th year since diagnose.

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I've heard from several sources that there is no clinical data to show soy causes cancer growth even in Er+ women. I too gave up meet with my first diagnosis. I eat tofu a few times per week but try to avoid more processed forms (powder supplements and energy bars etc). We use a product called quorn too (it is a mycoprotein/mushroom based protein and their faux chicken us good when prepared with a sauce)...plus beans and leafy greens, nuts etc for protein.

I believe most things are ok in moderation (including soy and sugar!). Plus, the hormones we (in the US) add to our meat can't be any better for you!

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Quorn is what we have every Thanksgiving - both my kids are vegetarians. I will be joining them this year. I don't like the mushroom gravy sold by Tofurky - anyone know of another meat-free gravy that tastes good? I love Thanksgiving foods and don't think I'll miss the turkey, since the Quorn tastes a lot like it - but the gravy is always a disappointment.

I have given up sugar, mainly because they give you glucose for the PET scan and those hungry cancer cells gobble it up. I figure that I don't want to feed them anything - and I'm a sugar-holic, so this is a big change for me. But it's now poison to me in my mind, which makes it easier to avoid. I am eating lots of green veggies, some fruit (not too much due to sugars), and stuff like hummus, white cheeses like mozzarella (caprese sandwiches are my favorite), whole grain breads and tortillas, falafel, tofu stirfry, etc.

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May be he meant to stay away from soy supplements.

http://foodforbreastcancer.com/foods/soybeans

"Soy Isoflavones Not a Risk for Breast Cancer Survivors, Study Finds"
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110405141703.htm
This is excerpt about soy intake:
"Women in the highest intake category of more than 23 mg per day had a 9 percent reduced risk of mortality and a 15 percent reduced risk for recurrence, compared to those who had the lowest intake level. However, these results did not reach what the scientists call statistical significance, suggesting the finding could be chance."
Our results indicate it may be beneficial for women to include soy food as part of a healthy diet, even if they have had breast cancer," said Shu. "This can't be directly generalized to soy supplements, however, as supplements may differ from soy foods in both the type and amount of isoflavones." "

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Vera:

It's so awesome that you decided to avoid sugar. Have you thought about cutting out fats too?

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Thanks to all for replying. Getting the whole diet straight is a little overwhelming, it helps to hear ideas and alternate choices others have made.

Have a great day,
Lorraine

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After my initial dx in 2007, I avoided soy. Then, I had a recurrence with mets and found research that said soy didn't really have an impact like originally thought. So, I do have soy on moderation---as far as mayo goes, I buy Kraft Olive Oil mayo instead of soybean oil based mayo. And, Although I love it, I avoid edamame. Other than that, I don't really pay too attention to soy content.

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Thanks @kathylhall, I forgot about the mayo! I'm getting the moderation message loud and clear which is much more realistic then cleaning out mt pantry ( like I did 2 days ago!!).

Lorraine

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When I asked my oncologist about nutrition she said that I could even occasionally eat Asian food despite the soy in it.

There are conflicting views - some say soy is beneficial, some say it is bad.

If it is bad it will hurt you. If it is beneficial, there probably are other foods that can provide similar benefits.

So, until I see a study that says that soy helps fight breast cancer in a way no other food or substance does, I will stay on the safe side and avoid it.

Unlike sugar, it is not much of a temptation anyway.

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Yes - my diet has always been pretty low fat, but I've added back olive oil (2 tbps daily) as it is supposed to help digestion and it also fights cancer. My problem has always been sugar.

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A little bit of soy equals a lot of soy!!!! Start reading labels folks! Your vitamins, especially liquid based ones have the primary ingrediant of soy (these are the cheap Wal-Mart versions) then your Mayo, your vegan products, your breads, processed foods and frozen foods, soymilks, tofu, and wa-la! You have just taken in a huge amount of soy in your Standard American Diet (SAD)!!! Ironic no? For me, I ate alot of soy and watched my tumor grow; my nutritionist say's there are no concrete measures/clinical trials to say it does anything for western women but he did say I could have a splash of Braggs for my sauteed veggies which made me very happy!!!

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Thank you!

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I don't eat Mayo (whatever it is) because it has high fat content. There is a vegan fat-free vegainaise (spelling) that I might use, but it has too high sodium content. So here I am, my condiments are freshly squeezed juices and fresh veggies/fruits.

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