rectal coil mri

hi guys-i'm having a rectal coil mri in a few weeks-can anybody tell me what to expect?pain level?etc
thanks for your help
joel n

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I had an endorectal MRI a couple of months ago as part of the diagnostic testing leading up to my prostatectomy on April 17. I was surprised at how painful it was to have the probe up my rear end for nearly an hour. I came close to asking that the procedure be stopped but kept telling myself that it was nearly over and that the test was vital for my decision making process. I'd ask ahead of time if they can give you something to help with the pain or take ibuprofen or another pain killer ahead of time. I have no idea if my experience is unique but no one told me how uncomfortable it would be. The biopsy, by comparison, for which I did get pain meds, was a piece of cake.

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I had an endorectal MRI 2 weeks ago, yes it was painful, and had to endure 45 mins with that coil in the rear end. On the positive side my regualr MRI that I did 3 months prior to that showed no lesion or existence of PC but the endorectal MRI showed clear lesion and PC. Worth the pain as it gives you the best picture of your prostate and whats going on in it.

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Hi nov1,

As stated by the two previous replies, yes the endo-rectal coil MRI is not a comfortable procedure (my opinion). In my case all pre-surgery test indicated that the cancer was contained to the prostate. My surgeon scheduled the procedure as that final check. Unfortunately, I could not go though with it. After three attempts to position the coil we (collective decision) called it off. The discomfort was only part of my issue. As a former jock I've learned to handle pain. I just don't do things in my body while I am awake very well. Giving blood doesn't hurt but I sweat bullets while the needle is in me. My robotic prosectomy was a breeze (for me) but the week long catheter darn near drove me nuts.

That being said, by all means do the test if you can. From what I have read at various times on this site, there are a lot of men who have had this procedure without to much discomfort and you might be one of them. After the first attempt to insert the coil while I was on the table, I ask if they could put me to sleep or at least give me a sedative and the answer was no. This might be a pre-scheduling thing verses an on the table issue. Ask you doctor before the procedure, you might get a different answer. From what I understand, the results of the endo-rectal coil MRI is a much more definitive test.

Good Luck!

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Hi,
I had the procedure and probe and the "going in and getting out" is an exercise but doable and no pain. They gave me plenty of lidocaine lotion. It is remarkable what the body can endure, so don't focus on this but on the good that will come of the imaging. If headphones are available, I would suggest music as its better to focus away.

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thanks guys for your info.my bottom will be ready for the thrill of the unexpected!

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thanks guys for your info.My bottom will now be ready for the thrill of the unexpected!!!!!

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joel, over the last 10+ years I have been enrolled in numerous trials for the MRI/MRSI with the coil, some with contrast agents. I was an early test for the proper type of coil, some are flexible, some are rigid... I have had as many as three in a year based on the studies. I have spent in excess of two hours in the machine with the coils for these experiments. So my tail end has helped in making this an easy procedure for other men.

Bottom line, here are some hints.... Ask your Dr. for a mild relaxing type of agent, this will help with be in the closed and tight spaced MRI machine too.

The technique of the placement of the coil is an art, the more experienced the tech is the better it is for you.... they will lubricate it generously to place the coil.... if it is going in hard let them know, they will/should slow down the placement, this gives your body time to adjust.

Once in it is a piece of cake, I have never had an issue for any length of time, your body will adjust after you are flat for awhile, you will know that it is there, but it does not "hurt" maybe it will be slightly uncomfortable, but you can not move in the tube anyway so it does not become an issue.....

The last experiment that I did was about six months ago, they used the fixed coil vs. the more flexible, and at this point in there development I do not notice that much difference in the two.

Be sure to do your clean out good, that is important, I usually do it twice before the procedure and always empty your bladder before jumping on that table...

LOL, it is not anything to fear, I have talked to some of other men that have done these trials and we are all in agreement on how important and how great this procedure is..... it has kept me in the Active Surveillance mode for many many years.

Any other questions, come on back at me....

Jerry

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I'm in agreement with Jerry as the procedure is only temporary and what they can see may improve your health. A mild sedative would help if you can't read or listen to music.

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I had the procedure and probe two months ago and it was easy! The nurse preped the area with zilacane first and inserted the probe. She told me if I followed her instructions it would go in easy. Take a deep breath through the nose and let out the air through the mouth. It was amazing that I had no problems and no pain during the procedure.

Good luck!

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thanks jerry-very helpful.will speak to my DR about sedation(or booze)before the mri.glad to hear you're doing well.keep"punchin"
joel

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I had my endorectal 3-T MRI last Thursday at the Univ. of Chicago DCAM. Quite an experience. You will lie on your side on the table to have the unit inserted and that is the worst part. As soon as you turn to lie flat it is comfortable. Depending on what they need you could be there for some time. I was just short of two hours. They had music but I couldn't hear it most of the time for obvious reasons. Never thought an MRI could make so many noises and extremely loud. Make sure the ear plugs are positioned well. I would recommend emptying the bladder before so you do not have to stop during the procedure. Removing the probe was no fun but it is quicker, like pulling off tape from a hairy arm. If you are having a biopsy within a few days be careful of what you take like aspirin and ibuprofen. My report came back showing no PC lesions so can't participate in the FLA clinical trial. Well, good news and bad. All in all the people at UC were fantastic and very knowledgeable and skilled. Good luck with your procedure. Keep us updated and where are you having this done?

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me again-i'm having the procedure done at sloan kettering in ny--I THANK ALL OF YOU FOR TRYING TO KEEP ME CALM!!!!

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I had one done at U Penn - singularly uncomfortable but not terribly "painful". Also had a color Doppler done in a clinical trial at Jeff. That involved a LOT of probing and I walked out like a greenhorn after the first long trail ride at a dude ranch. This was a very bad case of hemmeroids so opted for the old Navy Corpsman treatment (a tongue depressor and some Bengay). That precipitates oooh, ahhing and fingernails on the tile - but was fine the next day. Under any circumstances - It is best to know what is going on before you have any cutting or radiation done.

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I had my endorectal 3-T MRI at NIH in Jan 2013 which confirmed the success of MRI Guided Focal Laser in 2009.
A little pain for peace of mind and quality of life? Just a walk in the park!!
Wayne

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Forgot to mention, a sedative can cause involuntary movement during test. This will translate to do overs!
Wayne

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Jerry,

What Doctor and Hospital are you using for AS?

Doug

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I have been active with trials, and their Dr.'s at UCSF, and they communicate/exchange data/onfo with my Dr. at USC, who I have been with for many years and I use as my "main" and on going Dr. .

My Dr. is a research/teaching Dr., normally working with patients that have, unfortunately, advanced PCa. I met my current Dr. via Dr. Steven Tucker, who now runs a clinic in Singapore, and my Dr. helped in his transitioning to Singapore. Met Steven Tucker when he was working with Dr. Liebowitz in LA, and who was a/the pioneer in alternative treatment of PCa, and that is where I started watchful waiting 13+ years ago when I was in my 50's, now 70+.

On the West (Left) Coast, I find great sources for AS in the LA Area, Dr. Scholz, Bahn, etc. and now at UCSF, Dr. Peter Carroll, etc. I live in SF Bay Area.

Does this help?

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Yes.

thanks Jermer.

I am on As but my doctor(who is very good) will not give me an MRI.

Doug

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I would say the procedure is uncomfortable rather than painful .... and here's a good practical tip -

Ask the tech to put on a radio station you want to listen to - music, sports, talk show etc. In my own case the MRI lasted about 80' split into two sessions, so listening to something you enjoy can make the time pass quicker.

Onwards & upwards, rd

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thanks-otisbd-will talk to tech before procedure to get a station i like.oldies but goodies-like me to listen to.my DR changed my procedure to only a regular mri=guess he saw the fear in my eyes.he said in my case a regular mri is fine--gleason of 3+3
one section has cancer-(one of 12sections)so here we go.
thanks again
nov1

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