high blood sugar!

So while driving to pick up my girl at daycare and bring her to lunch as a "special" day for her and I, her doctor called to ask how she was doing, I thought it was strange since I have an appt tomorrow afternoon with them. I was like "oh she is ok" wait is something wrong I know I just did her lab work? I have noticed she has been complaining about her head hurting and feeling sick to her stomach, something I was going to bring up to the Dr tomorrow, now the Dr said her blood sugar was high! Normal? I am sure just reading up on the side affects she seems to have a few and that would just be yet another one.. Oh yay, only 6 weeks into this treatment I am second guessing myself, just so unsure of the different options out there.. I am going to have a heart to heart with the Doc or I will be searching for a new one!!! We shall see.

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14 replies. Join the discussion

I'm maybe just having a hard time following...why would you look for another dr?

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I know sometimes I can ramble on! I feel like I am getting no answers from my Dr and if he doesnt really talk to me today than I will be in search of another Dr. This is very new to use we have only been dealing with it for the last 3 months and its very hard to find ANY Dr that knows how to treat it.. I have seen some Dr's go research it online and come back into the room and say well I think we should just start off with some creams, if this doesnt work than I dont know what to do!!!!! So it is hard to find any Dr that have dealt with Scleroderma in a child, and it's very active right now and it is deforming her foot and limiting her range of motion and spreading rapidly. So I am in freak out mode!

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I have had scleroderma for 9 years. Ironically I went on a low glycemic/anti-inflammatory diet that reversed my scleroderma symptoms. The diet is designed to lower blood sugar levels and keep them stable. I often wonder if there is a connection between my blood sugar levels and my disease.

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Hey Ibif68; just an FYI, on a visit to my docs some 9 months ago, I put the clinic in a state of panic. I felt perfectly fine; yet my sugar was at 800+(not a typo). There is no history of sugar in my family and my doctor said it was directly related to my meds; especially Prednisone. I now take insulin, with 200 or less as my target sugar level. Hope this helps.

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Yes it helps guys thank you so much!! Saw the Dr today and he did say that the meds were to blame but that I should still watch what she eats!!! New diet coming our way----now only if I knew what that was...lol

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This is the outline for following an anti-inflammatory diet, which is very beneficial with these auto-immune diseases. I, as well as many others here, follow a gluten-free diet also.

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02012/anti-inflammatory-diet

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Sorry I missed your earlier discussions. Your daughter has localized scleroderma (not affecting internal organs)? And the medication she is taking is Prednisone? Let me know if those assumptions are wrong!

Anyway, YES, steroids increase blood sugar. They can cause diabetes which is usually temporary and goes away after the drugs are stopped. Occasionally the diabetes is permanent. I've heard of people who have come off of Prednisone because of their out-of-control blood sugar readings. High blood sugar levels AND having lots of ups and downs in blood sugar can cause all sorts of awful complications. However, there's a reason the doctor prescribed Prednisone so you'll have to find out whether or not the doctor feels that the good outweighs the bad at this point or not. I'm sure you know that Prednisone is a drug that you can't stop suddenly, so if the doctor did believe she should come off of it, it would be a gradual process of reducing the dose. The doctor might also feel that it would be worse to be off the Prednisone than to develop diabetes. There are obviously lots of pros and cons to consider in this situation.

I really feel for you. I have a daughter who is 4 (she's my profile picture) and I would be completely devastated if she were diagnosed with a serious disease. (I'm the one who is sick.) My daughter actually had a bladder infection that took us to the ER a couple months ago and while we were there they found sugar in her urine. I asked how much sugar was normal in the urine and they said "none!" That led to blood work and her sugar was a bit elevated there too. Ultimately they decided it was not an emergency and told me to follow up with our family doctor later and she's tested negative for diabetes, but the sugar in the urine is unexplained. We have a lot of diabetics in my extended family, including my dad, uncle, and grandma, and I have pre-diabetes too.

I do know quite a lot about the low-glycemic diet and can help you with any questions you have about food choices. There are also low GI cookbooks or ones specifically geared to diabetics. A low GI diet is healthy for everyone so I would really encourage you to adopt it - it would be good for your whole family.

The link that ljenks posted is great - that's for the anti-inflammatory diet, which is a bit different from the low GI diet. A lot of people with autoimmune diseases have high levels of inflammation and also a lot of food intolerances, so the anti-inflammatory diet is helpful. There are different variations on it, but most remove gluten, dairy, and sugar, and encourage you to eat whole foods instead of those that are processed, packaged, fried, etc. The low-glycemic diet is a bit different because its goal is to stabilize blood sugar levels so it doesn't remove gluten or dairy. A low GI diet does take out white flour and sugar and encourages you to eat unprocessed foods like fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, beans, nuts, whole grains, and good fats. Beyond that, you choose foods based on how they affect blood sugar so some fruit would be acceptable and others wouldn't. For example, an apple doesn't blood sugar much, but tropical fruit like pineapple or mango does. Some of the starchy beans like chickpeas can cause higher blood sugar too. Some foods cause a big spike and then a fall, whereas others barely raise blood sugar at all and the increase they do cause is slow and gradual - more like a gentle hill than a big spike. :)

I think the anti-inflammatory and low-glycemic diets are great and they're not hard to follow once you figure out what to substitute for your (or your child's) favourite foods.

This must be so overwhelming for you! Let me know if you have any questions. I can also give you tips on testing blood sugar at home if you need to do that with your daughter.

Zoe

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CoolHandsLuke,

800+ blood sugar?!!! I can't believe it. You're lucky you survived that! I've always been told it's best to stay under 140 and definitely try to stay under 180. Mine has been around 220 after a carby meal a few times and I thought that was quite high! I'm not on Prednisone though.

Glad you are managing okay now. Keep up the good work!

Zoe

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Hi Zoe,

My diet is so similar to Low Glycemic. I do have gluten, but only the flour free breads. I eat ezekiel bread only. I don't eat potatoes, carrots, bananas, or pineapple. The sugar/starch content is too high. I can't have brown rice, but can have brown rice pasta. I don't know why there is a difference. I have cut out sugar, flour and starchy foods. Meat, fish, nuts, most fruits and vegetables are fine. I can eat dairy like milk, cheese and eggs. I don't understand why this diet works, but it does. I feel alot better on it and the only medication I take is a thyroid supplement.

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My daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at age 5 which is also an autoimmune disease requiring insulin to live. It can be very serious if not treated immediately. I hope your daughter's elevated blood sugar is from medication instead of another autoimmune disease. I am so glad she has a doctor's appointment. Please keep us informed. Good luck to you both.

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Thanks Zoe; yeah it was a crazy day at UAB's Kirkland Clinic, as I was emergency wheelchaired to the emergency room. I was dumb to the fact because I had no knowledge of diabetes; so I'm like why is everybody freaking out? When they took it again and the machine only read HIGH, I asked what does that mean and the nurse said the machine only went to 600, the light went off that this is bad. They gave me insulin and it went down to 150 in an hour and I've been on insulin since. I take a ton of drugs including Prednisone 20mg; and getting off equals unbearable pain, so we press on. Now everytime I go for followups etc. everyone from the parking garage on looks at me like that guy. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Oh duh on my part! I didn't notice your earlier post that the doc said it was from her meds. After what my poor daughter has been through I kind of panic when I hear of a child having an elevated blood sugar. Did they say which med caused it? I know prednisone and HCTZ can elevate the blood sugar but not familiar with any others. Just curious, I guess it's the nurse in me...lol.

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SaS56 yes she is on prednisone and also methrotrexate.. The Dr said we will keep her on it for now she Scleroderma is rapidly spreading right now so I would rather keep her on the treatment plan and watch her diet.. Yes it is freaking me out we are using two different creams to try to soften her skin, she has been complaining about pain witch isnt normal for her but the Dr said this is the treatment we must follow for now.. I will keep you posted..Thank you..

Zoe123 I need to learn more about the GI diet I feel that may be the best for me since I also have a grandson who cant have dairy, wheat or soy and that sounds like it should cover that.. Funny I also have some of MY children and my nephew living with me 17-21 yrs old and I just told them NO MORE REAL FOOD...lol It's time to change eating habits for all, just very hard to learn the unknown. Do you know of a good web-site or book for the GI diet?? Let me know.. Thank you so much for all your help..

ljenks Thank you for the web-site I heading to it now...

I must say I have gotten SO much more information from all of you in the last few days than I have gotten in close to 5 years trying to figure out what was wrong with my girl.. I cant thank you all enough for sharing your stories and knowlege with me.... I feel more at ease..

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Here's a lot of good information from Wikipedia on what the Low GI Diet is all about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycemic_index

Here's a blog about it by the author of a cookbook I own: http://ginews.blogspot.ca/

And here's one of her cookbooks: http://www.amazon.com/The-Low-Diet-Cookbook-Recipes-The/dp/156924359X/ref=s r_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333676667&sr=1-5

I have a different one of her cookbooks, Low GI Vegetarian, which I really like. I've made a lot of the recipes and they've worked out well. It also has a weekly meal plan in the front - one for adults, one for kids, and one for teens. Those authors (Jennie Brand-Miller and Kaye Foster-Powell) have another good book called The New Glucose Revolution, but it's more of an informational book than an actual cookbook.

Also, can you ask your doctor to refer you to a nutritionist at the children's hospital? There are diabetic counsellors and I bet they'd be happy to see you even if your daughter doesn't officially have diabetes. They can help you make a meal plan, give you tips, etc.

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