Vision Problems After Surgery

Ladies,

I had a valve replacement in 11/06 Aortic and a anuerysum repair in my root. I have had vision problems ( up close) reading and such since then. I have worn glasses for the computer and work for a few years before but now my vision seems to just come and go (blurry) at times of the day?? Talked to my surgeon regarding this he says since I was on the bi-pass for 6.5 hours that that it will take time to heal, that sometimes air pockets get behind your eyes? He told me to also go to the eye doctor and have my eyes checked. Has anybody had trouble with this or heard of this problem. Doing good other wise, still some good and bad days. Hate the ticking of my valve!!!! I have a St Judes valve, and on blood thinner. I am 50 years old!!

Kind Regards

Marsha

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You should go to an opthamologist to get your eyes checked.

Also, your blurry vision could be a side effect of your meds.
This happened to me on TOPAMAX. Check the PDR about visual side effects of your meds. Believe it or not but doctors do not read everything.

Ellen

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Hi Marsha:

I also have blurry vision off and on, which causes difficulty reading. I was just diagnosed with
Neurally Mediated Hypotension which basically means my blood pressure drops to double digits when I stand up and rebounds to highs when I sit. (Ex. stand= 40/50, sit= 160/95).

I am going to Scripps next week and hopefully they can help me solve this problem.

Keep in touch with us all,

Barb

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I had a bypass July 06 and it took a long time to get my vision back. I'd guess at least 6 months. And I am 50 also, with bi-focals. Eye Dr. says my eyesite has not changed but it sure feel like it has gotten worse. Also all the meds I am on for my lungs (I got put back on the breathing machine while in ICU so lungs are worse) that I now have dry eye and put ointment in my eyes at night. So I agree with the comment to check your meds.

Good luck

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The paperwork I brought home from the hospital after my bypass surgery (December 2006) stated that you may have vision problems for several months afterward, but that it would eventually go away. (does not mention why), but sure enough I have had (and still have) blurry vision off and on since. I have had an eye exam and everything is fine, so assume it will get better. I am 56 years old and have worn bifocals for many years.

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Hi Marsha
I had a quadruple bypass and was on the heart lung machine for over 8 hours. I had major vision problems for a couple of months after the surgery as well as memory problems.
I was told that the heart lung machine has so much force behind it that it causes swelling in the brain and the small veins and arteries of the eyes. My doctor told me to wait it out and if it didn't get any better (the memory and vision problems) he would refer me to a neurologist and and opthomologist (probably spelled that wrong). My visison problems did clear up in approx 6 months although I do wear glasses now, when before I only used them for reading. My memory problems lasted for over 1.5 years. (Mostly because of the the Vytorin). I take Plavix along with a bunch of other meds. I'm 49 now.
It couldn't hurt going and getting your eyes tested. I've always heard that after 40 your vision starts to change naturally any way, the heart lung machine may have just help it progress a little faster.
St. Jude is the Patron Saint of Hopeless Cases I think your pretty lucky to have it, he's watching over you and taking very good care of you.
As far as the terrible ticking ,sweetie it means its working and your still here. it's BEAUTIFUL MUSIC, THE SOUND TRACK OF YOUR LIFE. Enjoy it. Relish in its comforting sound.
Take Care
Patty

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Sorry Ladies
I made a mistake in saying it was the Vytorin that complicated my memory it was Lipitor.
Sorry
Patty

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I am thrilled to find this board. After my bypass i couldn't find any one talking but drs on forums.

My right eye has sagged ever since my heart by pass in July. I have shown each doctor and they all shrug likes it not important. I look like my mother now -- who had a stroke -- and the vision is blurry in this eye. I'm getting ready to move out of state so I thought I should wait to see an eye doctor.

Whats the best doctor to see to test for a stroke-- the cardiologist doesn't seem concerned.

Thanks,
Robin

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Hi Marsha. About 5 years ago I had severe pneumonia. I was very ill and dehydrated and spent ten days in hospital. After that my vision deteriorated a lot. I got some drug-store reading glasses but after a few months they were way too strong and my vision came back. Now, after by-pass surgery in April, I needed them again and they are just right! At first after the surgery I saw a lot of "floaters" which my opthamologist said was very common and I should let him know if they get any worse. They have significantly improved over the last few months. What I do notice is semi-hallucinations in that I will wake up at night and see someone in my room, and then I will realise that it is just the shape of something on a hanger. I remember this sort of thing used to happen when I was a small child and I'm assuming that it too will pass. I understand that anaesthetic has a lot of temporary effects, and I think when you combine that with by-pass surgery, where your heart is actually stopped, then it really has a tremendous impact which should improve over time.

Hope you find this to be the case!

Cheers, Penny

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Hello Penny,
I saw your post from 3 years ago and was touched by how closely it mirrored my recent experience. In a nutshell, a neighbor, who happened to be a pulmonologist, convinced me to go to the closest ER because he suspected I had a damaged aortic valve. He was right. But turns out I also had an aortic aneurisym that was close to rupturing. I was in the hospital for 16 days. I was on bypass for 8 hours during the surgery to repair the aneurysm and put in the St. Jude valve. Probably like you, I was then totally sedated in the ICU for another 36 hours. This was about 8 months ago.

I've had the vision stuff: the floaters, the flashing jazzed lines, the double vision and, worst of all, the sudden loss of vision in one or the other eye--sort of a brown-out--that lasts about 3-5 minutes. All supposedly "normal."

Here's the thing. I know the St. Jude valve is a good one. It will outlive both of us. The pig valve would need to be replaced after about 10 years. I'm okay not having that prospect. But there is the "ticking" issue. Only you and I and others with this type of valve know what we're talking about. Everyone who doesn't have one says "You'll get used to it. It's like the sound of your breathing. You eventually won't pay attention to it."

If you're out there, Penny, let me know if, after another 3 years from your post, you still are hearing the clicks and it's bothering you. I tune it out most of the day but not so much at night at bedtime and mornings when I first wake up. I've heard that the sound is supposed to make us feel grateful that we're alive--which, duh, it might--but have you started to tune it out? You doing okay after all you've been through?

Best,
Jebbie

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Hello Marsha,

I saw your post from 3 years ago and was touched by how closely it mirrored my recent experience. In a nutshell, a neighbor, who happened to be a pulmonologist, convinced me to go to the closest ER because he suspected I had a damaged aortic valve. He was right. But turns out I also had an aortic aneurisym that was close to rupturing. I was in the hospital for 16 days. I was on bypass for 8 hours during the surgery to repair the aneurysm and put in the St. Jude valve. Probably like you, I was then totally sedated in the ICU for another 36 hours. This was about 8 months ago.

I've had the vision stuff: the floaters, the flashing jazzed lines, the double vision and, worst of all, the sudden loss of vision in one or the other eye--sort of a brown-out--that lasts about 3-5 minutes. All supposedly "normal."

Here's the thing. I know the St. Jude valve is a good one. It will outlive both of us. The pig valve would need to be replaced after about 10 years. I'm okay not having that prospect. But there is the "ticking" issue. Only you and I and others with this type of valve know what we're talking about. Everyone who doesn't have one says "You'll get used to it. It's like the sound of your breathing. You eventually won't pay attention to it."

If you're out there, Penny, let me know if, after another 3 years from your post, you still are hearing the clicks and it's bothering you. I tune it out most of the day but not so much at night at bedtime and mornings when I first wake up. I've heard that the sound is supposed to make us feel grateful that we're alive--which, duh, it might--but have you started to tune it out? You doing okay after all you've been through?

Best,
Jebbie

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