Nuclear stress test...Help!!

Hello everyone...thank you for all your great advice. I have a question, what can I expect to happen during a nuclear stress test? I am having one in two days and I'm terrified. I cannot use the treadmill or bike so I am having an injection to stress my heart...that is a big worry to me. I'm told its no different to wearing a nitro patch, is that correct?
Thanks in advance for any input.
Cheers Helen x

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There was no one more scared in life then was last year when I had this test done. I cryed in the waiting room and almost fainted from fear when I got back there and they had not even touched me yet. I will say this.. Its over super dooper fast and it was not as bad as I thought. The nurses were telling me that I was making it sooo much worse and that I would be fine and I was. My heart rate went up high even for the rest portion of the test because I am a big baby. I didn't even get a good reading because I let my nerves take over. Just relax and breathe and it will all be fine. I did feel my heart rate go up but its gotten up higher then that with the treadmill. I had the Lexiscan so if that's the one your having you will great! :)

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And it makes your chest tight a bit, and you feel weird...but don't worry..it's very fast, like dootles said, and they give you caffeine right away. That reverses the drug..it will be fine. I just wanted to let you know so you did not freak out and think you were having a heart attack.

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Thanks for your response. I have to say I'm still scared! Sounds horrible, but I have to have it done.
Thanks again xx

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You will do great and they will take care of you. Please be sure to let us know how things turn out.

Julie

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I have had this, and it is amazingly easy! It is over amazingly quickly, and it doesn't hurt at all. I'm going to describe what mine was like, maybe it will help you a little.

I was taken to the room where they were doing the test, and I changed into a lovely hospital gown. Then I was taken to the table where they do the ekg/stress test. An IV was inserted, and ekg leads were placed. The nurses/techs were explaining what was going to happen, and how I would feel. They told me that I would probably feel a rush of warmth over my body, and some women feel this especially in the crotch, to the point of feeling like they have urinated. They told me that there were women who swore they had urinated, but actually it had never happened to any of their patients. I did feel that rush of warmth, and it was quite disconcerting, but not painful in the least. I also felt some chest tightness, but nothing I would call discomfort. That is it. That is all the test involves. They give you the antidote to the "stuff" they use to create the stress almost immediately. Then they take off all the leads, take out the IV catheter and you are finished. It takes longer to get you all hooked up than to do the test. I promise you, it was easy peasy!!

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This is encouraging to me. I'll be having the nuclear stress test next week, but on two consecutive days. Has anyone else had the test split up like that? Thanks!

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I have had this done also and it is a piece of cake....so easy. If you feel anything just tell them and they will explain where that is coming from. We talked and joked around with mine and I was very relaxed . It really was so easy. Certainly easier than going to the dentist..LOL

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Thanks, tpmcg002 (wow, that's a keyboardful!). I used to hate going to the dentist, too ... before I discovered my current dentist, who I love...

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Hi
I've had the exact same test!

They led me to a room and sat me down (my wife was with me), they talked and explained what was happening constantly. They set up an IV and started to inject 'whatever' in me, I had a slight event - not a full blown oh sh*t one. My wife said I went white and it upset her more than it did me. Another person constantly measured BP and pulse. At some point (not long) they administered the 'get over it' and I was fine again, they then injected radio active stuff in. There was rules about me coming into contact with children and the sick for a few days.

I then went back into the waiting room and was told to drink at least 2.5 litres of water. After 30min they directed me to the loo and then into a PET scan and I spent 20min with a doughnut turning around me. This was pictures of the heart just after stress and I felt fine.

2 days later I went back and just had the nuclear stuff and PET scan again.

During the two days I had started to have spasms but I did not tell them! because the second day is pictures while normal my spasms affected the out come but they said that they had seen enough. It is recorded as me having a 1% reduction in flow (them spasms) but they saw a difference in flow and 2 months later I was diagnosed with Small Vessel Disease.

It is not the most excitable thing to do but it's not too bad. One upside is that you glow in the dark for a few days (ONLY JOKING)

Kel

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Thanks so much all of you! I'll let you know exactly how it went xxx

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The main thing you need to do is drink a lot of water before and after. You might have as light headache, which you can get rid of with a large soda that has caffein in it. You will do fine.

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Well...I had the dreaded test this morning and apart from a heavy feeling it wasn't too bad. My heart is fine and the general opinion is that my chest pain is caused by stress...I must say I find that hard to believe, but there you have it :)

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I'm happy it's over for you and that your heart is fine. Wonderful news!!

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Congratulations, Trentham! I'm looking forward (gulp) to mine this coming Monday and Tuesday... in preparation for femoral popliteal bypass surgery, which is scheduled for Dec. 2. I'm a bit anxious, though a couple of good friends and my brother, all of whom have had heart attacks (which I have not) say it's nothing to be scared of. Still ...

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I am suppose to have excerise stress test. Do they put blood pressure cuffs on your arms? I cannot have blood pressure on arms because of stents. Please advise as this is new doctor and he is adjusting to both arms with stents.

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Hi Natty,
Yes they monitor your blood pressure during this test. Surely they are aware of your situation? If not...make them aware.
Take care xx

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Piece of cake! Not to worry: it is quite safe, really!

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Had the first half (the anxiety-producing half) of my Lexiscan nuclear stress test this morning. You're right, Condoline, it was a piece of cake! The only reaction I had was that it felt like my heart was beating a bit faster, which the nurse confirmed. That's all. I was anxious for nothing ... but then ...

Tomorrow I have the second half, which is just another set of images. Of course I have no idea what they show, but I'm happy this morning.

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I am very happy to report that the cardiologist pronounced that "the stress test was fine." He has given his blessings to plans for a leg bypass by my vascular surgeon on Dec. 2. Hallelujah, my heart is fine!

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I had the nuke stress test and ended up throwing up once it was done and I was back at work--but that could have been the caffeine deprivation (I am a serious addict) or the risotto from the day before (I really like mushrooms). I was told that it was very unusual. And the next time I had a test that deprived me of caffeine for most of the day, I had a good strong cup the night before (and I was still going to be without it for more than 12 hours) and felt much better during that test.

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