Medical Alert bracelet

Does anyone wear a Medical Alert Bracelet? if so, What does it say?

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17 replies. Join the discussion

Nia:

That is a great question! I and I'm sure others might not have thought of that. My husband has a medic alert necklace. I'll ask him how all that works! Thanks for being so smart! We might also check the various web sites that provide those. Someone's life could be saved by one of these.

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Coincidences are amazing...I had just ordered bracelets for my husband and myself using Amazon.com. (House bound, shopping for anything must be done online and Amazon seems to have access to everything.) Jim's will simply say "coumadin", mine "see wallet". My wallet contains a two-page document giving diagnoses, medication, next of kin, and information to answer these question that the business office in the ER demands. I assume everyone on Inspire has one of these, but the bracelet lets the ER medic know it's

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Oops. I seem to have deleted "there", there! I thought you might wonder if I had deleted a paragraph or two of something worth reading. Nope. Just a "there" and an end-period.

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Hi Johnston 624:

Thanks for the info. I am going to see my doctor tomorrow and see what he suggests, too. However, I have all my husbands meds info in my purse (he's a transplant patient) along with mine and other pertinent info for him. Now I have to get everything for myself in there. I am new to all of this but feel lucky to have a lot of "wise old heads" to help me figure every thing out! Thanks!

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With my first ICD the company provided a Medic Alert bracelet. I wore it until the ICD had to be replaced and the new company didn't provide one. I still don't wear one (and don't carry any information with me about meds or anything else). I have looked into getting a bracelet but I wonder if the EMTs would even notice the pretty beaded medic alert bracelets? In the past I was told EMTs don't look for any kind of medical jewelry - they just treat whatever you present with.

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Good comment...i have one of those buttons set to tell the world that some old bat has fallen and can't get up. It gets tangled in my chained spectacles at inconvenient times, it is annoying. Ah yes I am sore tempted to leave it on the dresser. It could possibly make a difference and I will try to reform. The little buttons are tested once a month, screaming "Emergency" loud enough, it seems to me, to be heard on the street, 34 floors below.


The Bracelet is to notify the ER personnel if one is unconscious, and manages as Jim did to sustain a bloody cut in a fall in the city bus. He was groggy and not adequately informative. I will have to nag a bit to make sure he carries the necessary information with him. The 911 medics have been here for him three times within the past year and I question one of them about Alert Bracelets. She confirmed your statement, but added that most of her calls were gun shot victims and the medical problem were rather evident!
I live in the middle of the City of Brotherly Love, where eventually everyone will "carry heat". sigh.i

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Hi! I have worn my Medic Alert bracelet for 6+ years now. I walk my dogs alone in a huge Park near my house. Should I collapse and not be able to speak, I would certainly want people who respond -- especially the EMTs-- to know that I am dependent on pacing from my ICD. Mine is the distinctive, original MedicAlert bracelet; I read some time back that it is not always helpful to wear one that looks like regular jewelry which could be overlooked in a crisis situation. If someone comments or asks about mine, I view that as positive. The more that people are aware of Alert bracelets, the more they are apt to respond quickly in an emergency. Hugs, laurali

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Thank you ladies for all your input. As a "newbie" I am very appreciative of everyone's comments, as they are so valuable!

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I bought 2 Wrist ID bands one black & one Blue with a metal plate engraved with line 1 my name & date of birth, line 2 my husbands name & our phone numbers, line 3 Heart Disease June 2011, line 4 2 medicated stents, line 5 my cardiologist and her phone # It is slim & nice looking but can be worn to work out as well I paid $18.48 tax shipping and all. The site was www.roadid.com I am very happy with them.

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I had run this question by my cardiologist. He told me that I don't really need one. It would add stress looking at it. Should something happen I could inform them I have an ICD/pacemaker.What if I am unconsious?? I am looking into this further.Do they look at the bracelet or wallet... They said if I was a diabetic then yes. Interested in what others think on this subject. Good luck in your decision!

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Just a P.S. While walking my dogs this afternoon, I came upon a parked emergency vehicle and 2 EMTs. I stopped and asked one of them if they actually look for MedicAlert bracelets when they arrive at the scene of an emergency. He answered, "Absolutely." He said it helps them to immediately see any special conditions, a list of at least your most critical Rx, your primary diagnosis/conditions, and any possible allergies. He also said it's good to have something called a "life vial" at home. Described this as a plastic vial where you can store a list of Rx, allergies, who to contact, dr.phone numbers, etc. He said this is especially good for older people who live alone -- many put them in their refrigerators?? First time I'd ever heard of this approach. But I did feel good that he was so positive about the MedicAlert bracelets. laurali

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Yes, I've had my medic alert bracelet since 1995 and must say it's one of the best investments I've ever made. It reassures me and gives me peace of mind. It tells about my heart condition, my allergic reaction to penicillin, that I had a heart attack, my electrolyte imbalance, that I have asthma and when a doctor or hospital calls medic alert they know my entire health history, medication lists, who my doctors are, and my emergency contacts. I love having it. Takes a lot of my fears away.

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I forgot to mention you have 24hr support with medic alert and access via the web so you can always keep your information updated. I believe in and will never be without my medic alert.

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I finally ordered a medical bracelet last month from universal medical id. I don't know why I took so long to get it as I was told when I had my icd implanted that I should have one ASAP. I had really shopped around online and I know there are a number of places to get these but I went with this company for a few reasons. You don't have to pay a yearly fee for their services, it's a one time thing included in the price of your bracelet. I uploaded all the documents I had my hands on from my sca and they are all stored in case of another incident.
I honestly am not plugging this company I am just explaining why I chose them. I also wasn't too impressed with medic alert as my Mother has used them for years and I wasn't too happy any time we needed to make a change it was more of a pain an anything. With universal you control your profile.

My brother in law ran the trauma unit in Miami for ten years and has just moved to a private hospital in Florida. He said all emergency personnel check the wrist, neck or feet for medical identification. It's imperative anyone with a medical condition have one. Also important to note that they are not permitted to check your wallet or purse. So for those that say check wallet or purse, not a good idea as they will need a police officer who is willing to do that and they have a whole page of paperwork to fill out anytime an officer goes into a persons wallet. Sad, very sad but true.

I guess the bottom line is, get a medical bracelet and get an online or call in service with it and keep it up to date.

It could save your life.
Annette

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I live in Canada (Ontario) and when we asked the EMT folks here they said they aren't allowed to check purses or walets but they have been known to do it.

Sad whm we live in a time when your life depends on information we provide to help us yet the system won't allow it because of some who may bring a law suit for 'missing'items from a purse or wallet.

Ridiculous really. I say if I need help go in my bag and take the info I have out in there who cares about the material things right?

Annette

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I was wondering if it states on you medical alert bracelet to check wallet card is that not giving your permission for someone to go in your purse?

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I had to call 9-11 first part of August ....I used my Lifefone system where I pushed the button on the necklace around my neck...Immediately a loud voice comes on saying "emergency" over and over until they answer at the other end..once they do they ask if I can talk and if so I tell them what's wrong....if I don't respond they automatically send an ambulance. Two of my neighbors are on the list of who they should call and they have keys to my house and usually here before ambulance.
Now this is good for me living alone.....but I also believe I need the medic alert bracelet that just has my short history on it as to what my health issuses are....this time I noticed the EMT's wouldn't go in my purse for list of medications etc and one of my neighbors did it for him.....all he said was they don't go in purses if at all possible and love it when others are there to do that............I guess in this world today they fear being sued or something....I did hear of a program by some fire stations that have the emt's where they will give you forms to fill out along with a plastic pouch type thing that you fill out with medical history and meds.....and then you can place on your refrigerator door.....this sounds handy.............

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