levothyroxine and herbs

Could someone tell me if there would be any reactions if I took levothyroxine for my thyroid and the Herbs listed below? Is there any I should not take?


HAWTHORN 510
GOTU KOLA 450
POTASSIUM 99
CINNAMON 500
BLACK COHASH ?
IRON 27
GINGER ROOT 550
CAYENNE 500
KELP ?
B-COMPLEX ?
ALFALFA 650
1 OVER THE COUNTER WATER PILL
GREEN TEA 400
MAGNESIUM
MULTI VITAMIN
ZINC 50
ROYAL JELLY 500
AMERICAN GINSENG 500
SELENIUM 50
GINKGO BILOBA 60
B6 50
VITAMIN C 500
VITAMIN E 200
BEE POLLEN ?
VITAMIN A 2000
VITAMIN D 2000
NIACIN 400
SAW PALMETTO ?
CRANBERRY 5000
FISH OIL

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You might want to check the site epocrates.com; you register for a free account, plug in everything you take, and it will search to see if you're taking drugs and herbal remedies that might not go well together:

http://www.epocrates.com/

They have two databases, prescription drugs, and "alt meds," which is where you'll find the herbal supplements. Both lists are alphabetical, and they also have a search function.

-Laura

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Thank you

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I don't know of specific reactions of levothyroxine with the herbs listed. However, absorption of levothyroxine is lessened when taken with multi-vitamins, iron and calcium supplements. You should probably take the herbs and supplements at least 4-6 hours after taking levothyroxine. I take my thyroid medicine first thing in the morning, then I take my viatmins and supplements in the evening and haven't had any problems. I have written a little about this on my web site www.hashimotosinfo.com/meds.html. You've brought up an interesting topic. I'll check the literature to see if I can find out anything about interactions with herbs.

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Very nice website. Thank you.

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I think you're playing russian roulette. Have you checked with your doctor? Or your pharmacist? They have the state of the art systems for compound interactions.

You also mention ONE OVER THE COUNTER WATER PILL (but nothing about the ingredients!) You don't mention your conditions, either! Hawthorn I believe is used in pharmaceutical meds (in fact, many or most meds are originally derived from organic ingredients). I went to Belize and along the "medicine trail", the one bush with a poisonous effect would often be growing along side the anti-dote plant. How much and how often and all that - who knows?

One recommendation: whatever you are taking, be sure that you have it all listed on a medic alert card and have it on your person if something should an accident ever occur. Even seemingly innocuous interactions can be quite serious and have side effects. Dose is also a factor. Too much of certain vitamins can cause bad side effects. Too much fish oil can be bad for someone who might have a bleeding disorder. Too many issues to list. There are also MDs who have been to nutritional healing schools who have a much greater knowledge of this stuff. For instance, Dr. Weil did a traditional Harvard MD, but then pursued alternative nutritional healing. Maybe you are working with someone who has that kind of background?

Best, Mary

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Yes I have a Doctor who would rather recommend Herbs than drugs. He has a list of the things I take. These are just diaretic water pills. I have been taking one 25 mil. Levothyroxine in the morning. Waiting 2 hours then taking my Wellbutrine, then 3 to 4 hours all other herbs and Vitamins. I have had a burning itch all over, lightly sometimes then worst other.

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