Quality of life issues. Advice needed.

Can anyone please assist me with figuring out how to improve my quality of life as I feel like my energy level is way lower than it was pre-TT and I have experienced other issues since the TT (June 2012) not limited to but including:

- Increased anxiety
- Irritability/mood swings
- Hearing/sound issues (Everything is so loud and bothers me. Coworkers who sit nearby irritate me with their presence and their typing makes my head physically buzz. Also, my hearing is much more pronounced and sounds are much louder to me than others around me. For instance, the closing of a kitchen cabinet will startle me and hurts my ears. The sound of the television from a separate room irritates me beyond normalcy. I never used to be like this.)
- Certain things that used to not bother me, now bother me. Certain things that used to irritate me, irritate me to more of an extreme.
- Stomach feels strange (Full/bloated.. something? It's difficult to describe but I just notice it feels distended or something, internally, and it's uncomfortable and I never had this feeling prior to surgery.)
- Difficulty staying focused on what people are saying when they are communicating with me. (I'm not sure if this is me being perfectionist and trying to ensure everything they are saying is being processed, but I don't think that is it. It's truly a problem. I lose track of what they are saying midway through.)
- Short term memory issues.
- A sense of overall coldness just prior to 'that time of the month' (this particular symptom is not that bothersome but it's just a change as I never noticed this pre-surgery.)
- Feeling like I'm in a bit of a fog. In need of some clarity and calm in my life.

My last TSH level was .28. My endo refuses to allow FT3/FT4 testing. Just had repeat TSH testing, and was told my dosage could be potentially reduced depending on the results of this latest TSH testing (my TSH has only slightly fluctuated since my TT). Will a decrease in dosage likely cause an improvement in terms of the above symptoms? Would cytomel potentially benefit me? Any thoughts on how to improve my current situation?

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No ideas, but I am in a similar position right now.

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You need to order your own FT3 and FT4, which must be carefully timed for good data meaning no labs right near taking meds or too far out either. Plus find a doctor that works with more than TSH. Many people use all kinds of ways of getting that from a primary care, osteopath, naturopath, endo who accepts cash, many other ways it happens.

You have super typical symptoms of a high Free t4 and low Free t3. I don't know to what degree but those are the exact symptoms one gets.

The cure is first and foremost a reduced T4 to bring the high FT4 down to reasonable, then correct for T3 deficiencies by adding T3.

See the Free T guide and if there are any questions on how to do it just shout, many on the list who have gone through this exact scenario (and not just me) will try to help.

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As BiomedEE said, definitely aim to get labs for free T4 and free T3, even on your own -- and consider seeking a different endo, one who is specifically willing to prescribe T3. All that sensory and mood irritability, particularly, seem characteristically too-high free T4 to me. The cognitive symptoms sound like they could be low free T3 or high free T4 or both. Coldness seems pretty classic hypo, meaning low free T3 in this case. Substituting some Cytomel for Synthroid (on a 1:3 or 1:4 basis, so subtract 15-20 mcg Synthroid for each 5 mcg Cytomel added) would likely help. Just reducing Synthroid without adding Cytomel might raise your TSH and could feel good or bad or some of both; probably would reduce irritability but could conceivably add fatigue. Keep us posted on your levels and what you find out.

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On my blog on the right site, I have some of how I cope. It's called "Helpful Hints for when not feeling well" - you'll have to scroll down a bit. Http://dj-thyroidcancer.blogspot.com

dj

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My hubby and kids have gluten issues. Your symptoms sound very similar to theirs. I agree look for another endo.

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Thank you very much for your responses all.

@BiomedEE & emmaleah, I appreciate your advice on getting my FT3 & FT4 levels tested. I knew my symptoms had to do with being suppressed TSH-wise, but didn't know if my T3 level might be off, so it's good to hear that my symptoms are typical of high T4 and low T3. It is also comforting to know that there is a potential solution to my current symptoms and that reducing my synthroid dosage and possibly adding some T3 could make me feel better. I will be calling other endos to see if any will allow the FT3/4 testing. I must also review the Free T guide in further detail to know what I'm doing when it comes to this testing. Not sure as of yet as to the necessary time lapse between taking meds and doing labs so will be sure to read up on this. I appreciate the support and insight.

@DariaJ, I reviewed the helpful tips for feeling better on your blog and didn't realize brazil nuts helped with converting the T4 to T3. It's funny, I actually bought some the other day. Guess that's a sign. Will need to continue with making them a regular part of my diet. I will also look into Tai Chi, but it seems yoga/meditation would be just as useful.

@Jubbie, I'll def be contacting other endos and it's interesting that your hubby and kids have gluten issues and have symptoms that mimic mine. I have been experimenting with a gluten free lifestyle but haven't committed to it fully. Maybe it's something I should consider. I have tested negative for celiac disease but definitely think my body reacts adversely to gluten ingestion, so it's interesting you mentioned this. I go back and forth all the time about whether or not to convert to a gluten free lifestyle. I use the fact that I didn't test positive for celiac disease as an excuse to indulge in gluten containing products at times, but know that a completely gluten free diet would be best given that I have an uncle and grandmother who both have celiac disease, and just think given that I had thyca, it would be a positive diet change for reduced inflammation and healing of any gut issues.

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Listen to BiomedEE. i had many of your symptoms and more. I followed his advice and happy to,say that following test results I switched to natural dessicated and have been feeling great since. I have my life back! Thanks again BiomedEE, i cant that you enough.

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I don't know if going gluten-free will take care of all your symptoms, but it just might help. Wheat products seem to induce gut issues and inflammation, as well as mood and anxiety issues. Read Wheat Belly, by Dr. William Davis. It might help some. Give the wheat-free lifestyle a couple or three weeks. You should have an idea by then whether or not it will help. Some people get wheat withdrawal, which can entail a feeling of sadness for a few days, and worsened gut issues, but they straighten out and feel overall better. Hope you find something that helps soon.

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Are you taking calcium? I was having a lot of the same stomach issues on calcium. As soon as I stopped (calcium levels normal) taking the calcium and just took a multi vitamin instead my stomach issues went away. Some people have trouble tolerating calcium in high doses.

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Gluten free diets have been suggested by many Dr s. Even if you don't have celiac disease. It makes a better environment for our bodies. It's one of this things that doesn't need you to buy anything. Finding out your levels of T3and T4 as well as reverse T3&reverse T4 will help you decide if you need cytomel. We have to be our own advocate here. If a Dr. Is disrespectful, doesn't care to listen, or refuses to do testing you have asked for. Kick them to the curb! There are lists of Dr s that are recommended by Thyca patients on the main Thyca site related to these forums, as well as on the Throid Sexy Facebook page. Almost every state is covered. Best of luck to you dear,
Terese in Michigan. Aka Swoozie64

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My hubby and kids are gluten intolerant not celiac. My son started first and it took about 6 months to really see this was an issue. My husband had different symptoms and he tried it too and in a few months he was feeling better. Than my younger son 30 tried it and he felt better.
My daughter in law bakes wonderful gluten free (gf) cakes and cupcakes and I can get stuff in Shoprite, Trader Joe's a place called Fresh market, Whole foods., Hannaford. I live upstate NY. Or you can bake. It is not cheap either way but healthier. I also order on line when there is a good sale at Vitacost or other online places for the pasta., or cereal hubby likes. My husband has tried different breads and I get Rudi's in the frozen section.
I eat regular junk food, bread and sometimes pasta. I eat the rice pasta too not bad, If on gluten my son goes into a food coma, can't think, sleeps, can not concentrate, no energy. Hubby' stomach blows up and he feels bloated so everyone is different. Wheat has changed through the years and has become more gluteness. If that is a word. More and more restaurants here have gluten free friendly options. Doesn't hurt. May not be your issue but you could feel better.

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Stay away from SOY!!! You'd be surprised how many things have soy in them, even vitamin supplements. Solgar makes a D3 with nothing but fish oils and D. I was very surprised to find a D3 I was taking originally, one of the first ingredients was soy and I used to get sick every time I took it!! Soy is in mayonnaise, etc. I substitute with avocados now, on sandwiches, salads - so much better for you and you get nice skin as a side effect!!! Sometimes it's not gluten, but wheat intolerance - they are two separate things, usually combined but sometimes not. Vitamin D3 also helps the "blues", especially in the winter when we don't get out into the sun enough. Good luck!

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Blackcat33 and all, I'm also personally a fan of gluten-free, low-carb living, especially if you've got Hashimoto's or other autoimmune conditions, of course including celiac. However, I also speculatively/tentatively put some stomach problems, esp. nausea and lack of bodily appetite, into the high-FT4 cluster of effects, independent of gluten and celiac, based on my own limited experience so far. Just some extra thoughts and grist for the mill.

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Wheat is gluten intolerance along with rye, barley and other grains. Gluten is in wheat. That is why you can not have wheat if you are gluten intolerant along with regular flour, soy to name a few. Both boys and hubby can not have wheat or the other grains or regular flour. regular pasta or bread or cakes or cookies etc. No gravies made with flour, so many things they can not have. It is tough cooking for them.

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Jubbie, have you looked at the Wheat Belly Cookbook and the new edition of Wheat Belly Cookbook with nothing that requires more than 30 minutes to prepare? I've tried several of the bread recipes and a couple of others. They are really tasty, and they have a lot of kid-friendly recipes in them.

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is it online will google the cookbook thanks

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Jubbie, you can go to wheatbelly.com and there is a link there that will lead you to a site to buy baking mixes, cookies, etc,. although they are very expensive. You can buy the cookbooks on Amazon, and you can preview one of the cookbooks. However, I didn't find any of the recipes there. If you have a good bookstore near you, you can look through the book there. The one with recipes that take less than 30 minutes has a good bread baking mix that I like and the other book has a recipe for walnut-raisin bread that is very good. I substituted dried cranberries for the raisins and really liked it. The texture is like that of a pumpkin or zucchini bread. Hope this helps you. I also found a recipe in the 30 minute book for a delicious broccoli casserole. Hope this helps you.

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I had TT Sept 2013. You are first that I have seen post about sound issues but I have the exact issue.

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Wow, I just want to say it's very comforting to know so many others have researched the benefits of gluten-free, especially after thyca. I have experimented several times, but always fail when it comes to eating out with friends/family. However, for the past week, I have started another gluten free trial to see if this helps matters. Still having some stomach issues, but I know it takes time for the gut to heal. I have bought several gf items from the store, but realize it's best to eat mostly natural gf products (ie. fruits, veggies, protein, seeds/nuts) for the best outcome.

@Samantha_McNail, we are definitely not the only ones with sound sensitivity as I have read other posts regarding the same issue. I'd be interested to see if your doc has tested your FT3/FT4 levels and what med(s) you are taking? It is a good thing to realize we are not alone in this. My thought is this symptom is a result of either excessive T4 and/or too little T3. Personally, I have yet to get my FT3/4 levels tested and am hoping this will shed some light on my situation. I do think the suppressed TSH is a contributing factor. My last reading was .2 and my doctor just reduced my dosage from 125 (w/1/2 pill on Sundays) to 112/day. Started this reduction on Thurs 1/16. Still having sound issues. Let me know what your status as far as labs as I'd be interested to compare notes.

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I think you have way too many symptoms to be able blame them all on gluten. I agree, gluten is an issue. I would definately get a full panel of labs done per biomeddEEs advice and see if your levels are a factor. I switched to NDT and started to loose most of worst symptoms right away. Once I got my energy and motivation back I was able to start working out and have dropped most carbs but especially gluten and continue to improve. Careful with gluten free products. Like most processed foods they are replacing with sugar which is the biggest evil of all. Good luck.

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