What causes psoriasis? Lectins may be a missing link.

** Originally posted by DottieD **

A lot of research has been done on psoriasis, mostly dealing with studies of the lesions or with the inflammatory chemicals (like TNF-alpha or interleukins) that promote lesion development. There is also plenty of basic research on the immune system and inflammation. If some of this basic research could be connected to psoriasis, we would have a better understanding of the causes of psoriasis, and better able to do something about it. This post discusses one important connection.

Psoriasis is an immune system disorder. Because of our genetic makeup we are prone to develop inflammation in our bodies, causing an inappropriate reaction in our skin and sometimes joints. The reaction may be more severe if we eat a lot of sugar, gain weight, are under a lot of stress, or irritate our skin. We can sometimes reduce this inflammation by taking medications, moisturizing, eating less arachidonic acid, taking supplements, or doing UV light treatments.

BUT WHAT IS THE BASIC CAUSE OF THIS INFLAMMATION? WHAT GETS THE PROCESS GOING IN THE FIRST PLACE?

A lot of people with p have reported that they have an inflammatory reaction to certain foods, most frequently wheat, dairy, legumes (beans), or nightshade plants. I had a bad flare after eating baked beans last summer and also had a massive breakout after eating wheat germ a number of years ago. These foods were causing a FOOD INTOLERANCE (also called a food sensitivity), and I have learned that something called lectins are responsible.

I have been studying exactly what happens when intolerance occurs – to see if this would shed light on how some of us develop psoriasis and why it sticks around. Here is my understanding from what I have read:

Our bodies’ cells have protein-sugar molecules sticking out on their surface. They are called SURFACE RECEPTORS and we are all unique in the exact structure of these molecules. (Please note that there are a lot of different types of sugars other than what we call “sugar.” The ones involved here are other members of the sugar family.) LECTINS are a class of proteins that bind to the sugar part of these surface molecules, but only if the structure is a perfect match – much like a key that fits a certain lock. Our bodies produce natural lectins that perform many functions, such as antibody actions. But we also eat a lot of lectins that come from plants. And some of these can cause a bad reaction in our body.

Our stomach and small intestine walls are lined with epithelial (skin) cells and some cells that secrete mucus. Like other body cells, they have surface receptors.

When proteins are digested, they are supposed to be broken down into amino acids before entering the body – either as single units or at most chains of 2 or 3. That way, the body can make the exact proteins it needs. Also, this prevents foreign proteins (as in viruses) from gaining a foothold. Our white cells are constantly on the lookout for foreign proteins and foreign surface receptors, and will go to work immediately to try to get rid of any they come across – this is part of the inflammation reaction.
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Suppose you have an intolerance to some type of lectin (such as gluten). Here is what is thought to happen when you eat it:

First, some of the lectin may attach to surface receptors in the stomach. This binding causes a decrease in mucus secretion which may result in overgrowth of bacteria in the stomach. The lectin attachments cause an inflammatory response in the stomach wall, causing it to secrete more histamine, which in turn stimulates more acid secretion. The person may feel heartburn.

Secondly, lectins are very resistant to being digested, so when they get into the small intestine they don’t break down into amino acids like other proteins. If you have an intolerance to the lectin, you have exactly the right “lock” on the cells lining your gut wall for the lectin “key”, so the lectin proteins attach to the gut wall. This binding causes disruption of the normal wall activity: the epithelial cells are stimulated to wrap their cell membranes around the lectin proteins and move them into the small intestine tissue (a process called exocytosis). Once in the gut tissue, the lectins cause an inflammatory response from the white cells residing there. In addition, part of this lectin moves on into your body circulation where it can cause damage to your body.

If you continue to eat the offending lectin day after day, month after month, the intestine walls gradually become more inflamed. They are stimulated to grow and divide more, causing disruption of the normal tight bonding between the cells; the intestine wall becomes more irregular and defective areas gradually develop. At some point these defects may become large enough for other proteins or protein fragments to leak through. These proteins may cause their own problems in the body (particularly in joints, brain, and skin), and the white cells and the liver have to work hard to rid the body of them.

The story is actually a little more complex, but this additional info explains why strep or other respiratory infections often cause psoriasis to develop or worsen. The following is a summary from an article by Dr. David Freed in the British Medical Journal (1999):

The tips of the protein-sugar molecules sticking out of our cells are normally covered with a fine screen of sialic acid molecules. Sialic acid is another member of the sugar family. Inside our body, this coating of sialic acid protects the surface receptors from unwanted lectin attachments and helps keep the cells hydrated. Strep bacteria and several other infectious germs are able to strip the sialic acid off the receptor tips when they invade the body. Thus, these receptors are now available for lectin attachment. The binding to lectins can disrupt the function of that tissue. It also causes white cells to attack the tissue - which is called an autoimmune response.

Another article explained that strep bacteria make their own lectins, and after stripping away the sialic acid, may use these lectins to attach to our cells.
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To be Continued: What can be done to solve this problem.
DottieD

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114 replies. Join the discussion

** Originally posted by DottieD **

I too have noticed a worsening of my skin when I bought whole wheat bread and ate a substantial amount of it. Whole wheat is touted as so much better for you than white flour foods and the glycemic index is lower, so I'm pretty sure many people with p eat whole wheat thinking that it will help their skin.

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** Originally posted by OtherThoughts **

Pdf file links

<a href="http://"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=glyco&part =A2261"">Plant Lectins</a>
<a href="http://"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=glyco&part =A1625"">
Discovery and Classification of Animal Lectins</a>

1980s research<a href="http://"http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/33/11/2338.pdf"">
Lectins in the United States diet</a>

The "Discussion" section of the following pdf link suggests that our loss of Siglec expression may help to explain the many T-cell mediated diseases, including Psoriasis in humans. It also posits that this may be tied in with the loss of neu5gc.
<a href="http://"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1472519/pdf/zpq77 65.pdf"">Loss of Siglec expression on T lymphocytes during human evolution
</a>

Excellent synopsis DottieD;)
[INDENT]For the rest of you, the important point he made was that sialic acid normally comes in two forms (Neu-Ac and Neu-Gc). Sometime in our evolutionary history, humans lost the Gc form through a genetic mutation. Thus, since it isn't a natural compound, any foods that contain the Gc form could be considered "foreign material" by our immune system and set up an some kind of inflammatory reaction. It turns out that cattle, hogs, and sheep contain the Gc form - in their meat and milk. So this may be another basic source of inflammation in the human body.

If Dr. Varki is correct, we might be better off limiting our consumption of red meats as well as milk, and stick to lean chicken and fish as animal protein sources.
[/INDENT]

Another point he made, which I felt was important as well, "Some fraction of any Neu5Gc that we ingest will become incorporated into our own cellular tissues". This means that our own cellular tissues become decorated with this Neu5Gc, which our immune system's detect as foreign. This would likely happen in proportion with our Neu5Gc consumption.

To the best of my knowledge, our bodies don't incorporate other types of "non-self antigens" into our bodily tissues.:confused:

Bear in mind that much more research needs to be done. Don't redefine your whole life based on this preliminary research. There may be many beneficial effects bestowed upon us by incorporating Neu5Gc into our cells as well, we just don't know yet.

Best Regards
OtherThoughts

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** Originally posted by phoenixrising **

Bear in mind that much more research needs to be done. Don't redefine your whole life based on this preliminary research. There may be many beneficial effects bestowed upon us by incorporating Neu5Gc into our cells as well, we just don't know yet.

Best Regards
OtherThoughts

Yes yes yes!! There are so many possibilities. The connections and relationships among pieces are the last part to get straightened out.

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** Originally posted by stewartintheUK **

got your pills yet dottie ?

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** Originally posted by stewartintheUK **

http://www.talkpsoriasis.org/showthread.php?t=41520


what do you think to this guys thread ? anything useable
?

stewart x

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

Other Thoughts - thanks so much for the references. The article listing plants that have been shown to have lectin activity was very helpful but discouraging. There are so few foods missing from the lists! Still, the tables gave some useful information: In many fruits and veggies, the lectins appear to be concentrated in or around the seeds. High fiber cereals usually have strong lectin activity.

The book "Lectins" arrived. It was revised in 2007, so I assume it's pretty up to date. I opened the book and read the introduction, then began the book proper. My eyes quickly started glazing over, as it was pretty much all chemistry for the first 325 pages! This may be important to scientists working in the field, but not too helpful for us. Chapter 10 deals with lectin nutritional effects, so I skipped to that chapter. Wouldn't you know, it's the shortest one in the book - 8 pages! If anyone could use the book when I'm done, let me know - I'll be happy to mail it to you (if you're in the US). A report on chapter 10 will follow in a few days.

I am still waiting for the lectin-binding supplement. I have also ordered a supplement that contains the 20 amino acids - in free form, not as proteins. My plan is to reduce (but not eliminate entirely) protein consumption for a while to give my gut a better chance if it needs to do any healing.

DottieD

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

I am on a quest to understand the actual cause of my psoriasis, and hope this effort will help many of you as well.

A few months ago I began studying food intolerances, and have concluded that they may be a major cause of psoriasis lesions. Food intolerances are caused by proteins in some plants (lectins) that are able to attach to the gut wall if you are genetically programmed for the “right” attachments. This attachment can cause an inflammatory response in the gut and the whole body. There are scientific studies showing that reduction in lectin binding has helped for other autoimmune disorders, but to my knowledge this has not been tested for psoriasis.

Today I plan to start such a 6 month test. I will try, as best I know how, to reduce lectin binding in my gut as much as possible. In part, this will be by avoiding foods that I know I am intolerant to (starchy beans and related legumes, and whole wheat). I’ll deal with the remaining lectins by taking capsules of sugars (this doesn’t mean table sugar) that have been found to bind lectins. The idea is to bind most of these proteins to the sugars before they have a chance to attach to the gut wall. I will be using Lectin Lock, but there is another similar product called DEFLECT. (I have no association with either of these companies.) In addition, I will be drinking Metamucil when I think it might help. It contains mucin, a substance that coats the gut wall and may provide a physical barrier to lectin binding.

The overall plan is this:
Cut way down on legumes (the starchy bean family) and whole wheat.
Continue to avoid foods that contain high levels of arachidonic acid (eggs, liver, fatty meats).
Eat in a healthy way – low sugar, plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits, some dairy, some lean meats, use light-tasting olive oil.
Before every meal, take 1 or 2 Lectin Lock capsules, depending on the size of the meal.
If I eat a snack with only white flour as the potential problem, take a pill of D-mannose (a sugar that binds to wheat lectin).

I plan to take these supplements:
½ Centrum
100 mg alpha lipoic acid
1 magnesium, ¼ selenium, 1 vit. B12, ½ vitamin C
2000 IU vitamin D (unless I get some UV that day)
400 IU vitamin E – M, W, F.
probiotic capsule – optional

Also, I have ordered some free amino acids (individual units, not as part of a protein). I may decide to reduce my protein intake for a while and take a complete amino acid supplement.

I don’t expect to see a noticeable improvement for at least one month, maybe longer. My hope is that after my gut has a chance to start healing from the inflammation of food intolerances, my skin will gradually become clear and the occasional flares will be gone.

I’ll be happy to answer any questions, and I’ll be posting progress reports, whether good or disappointing.
Here’s to a positive result!!
DottieD

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** Originally posted by phoenixrising **

Here's to a positive result, Dottie. The experiment and results will be interesting.

I tried something similar to this years ago. I ate only lean meat, vegetables, an occasional fruit, and nuts (very Loren Cordain - but nuts contain lectins). I completely eliminated all grains in any form, all legumes, and all dairy (which I typically don't consume anyway). I stuck with that diet for about three months, and during that time my P lesions worsened. This occurred at the same time that I was using NB-UVB, driving to the derm's office 3X/week because I didn't have a home unit yet. However, I didn't take the supplements that you are.

Best wishes.

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** Originally posted by NYGuy11 **

Dottie, quick question. As you embark on your 6 month test, how are you doing with your psoriasis now? Are you clear? Are you covered? Are you dropping whatever "program" you're on now and going on this program of your own?

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

Ouchyk - No, alpha lipoic acid is an antioxidant that the body makes in small amounts. It is very effective as a free radical scavenger in the body, and allows your body to use vitamin C and E more effectively. It comes in capsules from 100 to 600 mg; I take the lowest dose. A lot of cancer survivors feel that high levels of antioxidants will help your body fight off any new cancers that may try to develop. There are studies to support that idea.

The reason I am curious about the amino acids is that I read about an experiment in which some scientists gave patients with rheumatoid arthritis a synthetic diet that just had amino acids, fats, carbs, vitamins, and minerals. They got better, presumably because when these patients ate proteins, the proteins were not being completely broken down before getting into the body (perhaps a "leaky gut"?) and causing inflammation, which made their arthritis worse. You can buy capsules that contain all 20 amino acids, but they are not combined into proteins. While it would be dangerous to use this completely instead of eating protein without medical supervision, I might decide to take some amino acids and eat less protein for a while.

Phoenix - when you went on your 3-month diet (and got worse) you said you were eating vegetables, fruits, and nuts. Perhaps for you, the lectins in some of these foods caused your worsening. We all have different, unique surface receptors on our cells, so you would need to discover the specific problem lectins for your own body. It's not a simple thing, but psoriasis is not simple! I am not trying to say this is THE answer for everyone, but the more I read, the more the pieces of the puzzle seem to be falling into place for lectins to be an important source of inflammation for many of us.

NY Guy - I haven't been on any kind of official "program" - but I have been trying to eat wisely. I don't take any drugs; I take a modest set of supplements and only use a steroid ointment now and then. I keep having flares that last a few weeks, and use my UVB light box to help get over them.

I was running about 90% clear until about 10 days ago, when I started having yet another flare. Why?? A number of my friends have come down with a worse-than-normal cold. I don't seem to have caught it, but I might have a mild case. OR, I may have done this to myself. I have been taking a bit of a break on "good eating" while waiting for the Lectin Lock to arrive. Our grocery is now selling hot cross buns, and I bought a container of 12. They were so good!! I ate 7 over a period of 3 days. Then I re-read the label and saw that they were made with malted flour - that's probably worse than whole wheat, lectin-wise! So now I'm down to about 70% clear. (By % clear I mean how much better I am than when I was at my worst.)

DottieD

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** Originally posted by stewartintheUK **

dottie is the other lectin supplement the same as Letin Lock, and is it cheaper? is there any form of common lectins they arent helping against? Finally is there a good list anywhere that shows the good to bad lectin content.

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** Originally posted by encyclopedia **

dottie is the other lectin supplement the same as Letin Lock, and is it cheaper? is there any form of common lectins they arent helping against? Finally is there a good list anywhere that shows the good to bad lectin content.

Stewart if you look at Barney's Formula thread, and go back for a few posts, you will see a list of foods with lectins and foods without. This topic has been well discussed in that thread. Here for example is one quote on page 126:

"I would go for no or low lectin foods...i mentioned that with links on the previous pages....I would stop eating flour, rye, pastry, pasta .cereal ,,,no gluten....and try rice instead...no milk for awhile...no tomatoes, or potatoes, no corn for a bit.....eat more light salads with vinegar and oil, whole fruit but no juice..cut back on sweets, ..meat is fine, tuna and fish are good...no beans of any kind, no peas,,....carrots are ok....."

Again another quote:
"no or lower lectin foods..
black pepper, cranberry, flounder, garlic ,kiwi,leek lobster, mung bean, some mushrooms, okra onion, pineapple, ,white rice brown rice,shallot, sole, oats.zuchini, aparagus,radish .chard sweet peppers,celery,parsley,apples,watermelon,grapefruit, lemon,orange,banana,orange,payaya,strawberries,plum,coconut walnut, hazel nut, i'll add as i find more and recheck the list as there is some contradictory information..


high lectin foods ..so try to reduce or eliminate


wheat, rye, barley,soy or soybean, fava bean, chickpea, corn, elderberry, pea, kidney bean, lentil, lima,wax and navy bean, peanut, pinto bean potato, pumpkin, rye, tomato, cocoa, black eyed peas, "

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

Stewart - I haven't looked into DEFLECT, although you could easily google it. I understand that this product has different formulations for people with different blood types - one for type O blood, one for type A, etc. (RayofLight tipped me off about this product.) The Lectin Lock costs about $40 for a bottle of 120 capsules, which may be a little pricey, given that you have to take 5 or 6 a day. But compare $50 a month to the biologics, or Dovonex or Soriatane, which cost anywhere from several hundred to a couple thousand dollars a month. As far as I can tell, the ingredients in Lectin Lock are very safe. I believe a number of people with rheumatoid arthritis take this supplement.

2 capsules of Lectin Lock contain:
N-acetyl glucosamine 400 mcg
Bladderwrack 200 mg
okra powder 100 mg
D-mannose 100 mg
mucin 100 mg
sodium alginate 100 mg
pepsin 50 mg

Each of these ingredients can be purchased separately from a number of sources. That might save money, but I doubt it.

I'm certainly not trying to push a product, but if you look at the list of foods Encyclopedia just mentioned, you see what a problem we have. The book "Lectins", written by Nathan Sharon, an international authority on the subject, lists these foods as containing lectins:
legumes: all
grains: wheat, rye, oats, barley, rice
vegetables: celery, asparagus, tomatoes, potatoes, sweet peppers, zucchini, cucumber
fruits: orange, lemon, grapefruit, watermelon, cantaloupe, strawberry, blackberry, raspberry, apple, banana, plum, cherry, papaya
other: mushroom, coconut, walnut, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, cocoa, coffee.

For foods containing seeds, the lectins are usually located in or around the seeds. Thus, if you discard the seeds the lectin content may be lower. The book does not say that this is a complete list! Any individual may only be reacting to one or a few of these foods. But which ones?

The problem with most treatments for psoriasis is that they suppress our immune system one way or the other. So we have something causing chronic inflammation, and we tone down our body's ability to react to it with a drug or UV light or whatever. Wouldn't it be so much better if we could just remove the source of the problem? If lectins are indeed a culprit, and we can tie them up before they attach to our gut walls and cause the inflammation, that would be an ideal way to deal with the problem. That's why I'm excited about this test.
--------------------------------

Stewart - you asked if there is a good list giving lectin content. I haven't found much on this. The owen foundation web site rated the amount of lectins in several foods with 1 to 4 pluses. I don't know where they got this info.
++++ beans, string beans, snap peas, dried beans, lentils, kidney beans, fava beans, lima beans, tomatoes
+++ mango, peas
++ soybean, rye

The book Lectins lists the scientific name of the particular lectins in a list of foods, but this isn't much help. The authors also name the carbohydrates that lectins can bind to: they are mannose, glucose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose, and N-acetyluraminic acid. Lectins can also bind to molecules that are composed of a combination of these compounds.
Lectin Lock contains N-acetylglucosamine, D-mannose, and Bladderwrack (which contains fucose). It also contains okra powder and mucin, which help to coat the gut walls and prevent lectin attachments.

DottieD

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** Originally posted by anatol **

Dear DottieD, wishing you a good luck on my behalf as such a test will benefit us all.

During your tests, you may want to consider not taking D3 as it tends to suppress the immune reactions. It is my understanding that once off D3, Ps comes back.

It is my personal observation that on days following the days I eat less quantity of food, my Ps is better. This could be the reason those who are on Juice fasting get good results.
In other words hard food, containing or not containing lectins, is not necessarily best for healing. Hard food and larger quantities of food make the guts work more and harder.
I presume making guts work less and the digestive system put out less digestive acids may be the way to handle healing of the guts. Juice fasting is very difficult.
Maybe eating small portions of hard food is easier than Juice Fasting.

One more thing I wanted to mention. Ps is not a modern disease. The word itself Psora i guess comes from the greek times. So during those times the diet of those people
was definitely foods that are all natural and unprocessed. However since they still had Ps with their all natural diet, the cause of the disease could be what they ate or a
disorder of organs. It is higly possible that they ate foods that were easy to store such as potatoes, rice, beans,... or others that contained high amounts
of lectins. But definitely far from the processed nightmare food of today's modern world. So their guts had much less to deal with than today's diets.
Considering this, I believe there is an organ failure someplace that helps the digestive system of normal individuals deal with all the food toxins and prevent the damage to
intestins. That is assuming the origins of Ps inflamations come from the digestive system / guts.

I am a believer of the Digestive System / Intestinal disease origin in Ps. However there must be some other factors in the formula.

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** Originally posted by phoenixrising **

Phoenix - when you went on your 3-month diet (and got worse) you said you were eating vegetables, fruits, and nuts. Perhaps for you, the lectins in some of these foods caused your worsening. We all have different, unique surface receptors on our cells, so you would need to discover the specific problem lectins for your own body. It's not a simple thing, but psoriasis is not simple! I am not trying to say this is THE answer for everyone, but the more I read, the more the pieces of the puzzle seem to be falling into place for lectins to be an important source of inflammation for many of us.

Yes, I know a little about surface receptors, I'm actually studying a bit about them right now in school, just by coincidence. The thing is, I won't assume that I have problem lectins for my body, something that has yet to be shown.

Edit: It is a hypothesis to test though. What you are doing is sort of like a case study. Too bad lectin pills don't exist. Then you could ingest some for a while and see if anything changes. Purify different kinds of lectins (there are so many and lectin research is in it's infancy) and eat a bunch.

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

Phoenix - Great that you are studying surface receptors! Hopefully you will share any pertinent info with the rest of us.
I did almost what you suggested with lectin pills a number of years ago: in my effort to get better, I bought a bottle of wheat germ and ate several heaping tablespoons a day for 2 or 3 days. Shortly thereafter my entire body was broken out. It was a massive reaction that I will never forget. It would be very difficult for me to do a similar thing now.

The problem with the aproach of a lectin pill is that you would have to eat foods with no lectins for some period of time to get down to a baseline. That leaves you with a pretty skimpy choice of foods. Then add one lectin (or food) at a time, and wait at least a week before adding another. Just taking a lectin pill wouldn't do, because the lectins in your diet would be complicating the issue.

You're right, this is a case study, not a scientific test. I am keeping a journal, but I'm not getting periodic blood tests, and I'm not limiting myself to any "standard" diet. So if I do clear up and quit having flares, it would only be a suggestion that this approach would be worth a closer look and perhaps a clinical trial. I'm trying to keep my eating fairly normal, because I want to come up with something that I can do for the rest of my life.

Anatol - you made some interesting points. With respect to vitamin D, I started taking it more for its anti-cancer activity, since I have had breast cancer twice (not related). Vitamin D helps lower the risk of cancer recurrances because it reduces cellular proliferation, induces apoptosis (normal cell death), and inhibits angiogenesis (the formation of small blood vessels to feed new tissue growth). That may also be why it helps p. In addition, vitamin D turns on genes that are responsible for producing the body's own natural antibiotic and antiviral compounds (cathelicidins). Since I plan to take vitamin D the rest of my life, I thought I should include it in my plan.

I agree with you about juicing requiring less stomach acid if the stomach does't have to break down large hunks of food. I have read that less stomach acid results in a higher proportion of "good" bacteria, which has several good effects in the gut. And (as I understand it) grains and legumes, the two worst food groups for lectins, are not included.

I believe the Greeks and even in the old testament times, people grew and ate a lot of grain. We don't know if cavemen (pardon - cave people) had psoriasis before agriculture developed. You probably know about the Paleolithic diet, which tries to replicate the way cavemen probably ate.

My p is not so bad anymore that I couldn't live with it if I had to. So I have the luxury of not feeling the need to take immune suppressant drugs or do radical dietary changes.

DottieD

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** Originally posted by phoenixrising **

The problem with the approach of a lectin pill is that you would have to eat foods with no lectins for some period of time to get down to a baseline. That leaves you with a pretty skimpy choice of foods. Then add one lectin (or food) at a time, and wait at least a week before adding another. Just taking a lectin pill wouldn't do, because the lectins in your diet would be complicating the issue.

Not necessarily. Increasing and decreasing lectin intake, via pills, while holding everything else constant in your diet (including lectins), could provide valuable info. if you got worse, and upon pill reduction improved (if the pill was pure lectins). A food intolerance typically doesn't involve the immune system, whereas a food allergy does. Also, with food intolerance there is more of a dose-response relationship, whereas with a food allergy even a miniscule amount can set off a severe histamine reaction. Has a dose-response relationship been suggested for lectins and P and your body, assuming there is a relationship?

However if you did avoid lectins for a period of time first, and then supplemented with pure lectin pills, it would (perhaps) more easily allow you to infer causation. When you go lectin-free (or lectin-reduced) and add supplements, many things are simultaneously changing in your diet. In that case, attributing change (+ or -) to lectins is unwarranted, because lectins have not been manipulated while holding other (potentially important) factors constant. How can you know that something else about your changed diet wasn't responsible for what you observed, or even some interaction among factors? Acceptance of case study limitations. This is why elimination diets have such great utility and are so powerful. I guess that's where clinical researchers might step in. I sympathize with not wanting to cause a flare.

If you clear with the current approach, the conclusion might be: lectins are bad for me. However, if you become worse while reducing lectins, thinking seems unlikely to be: lectin containing foods might improve my P. The interpretation of results might then be based upon a specific, existing cognitive schema, rather than direct evidence (or lack thereof) for causation.

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** Originally posted by DottieD **

I agree with your thoughts about various ways to conduct a trial and what you would learn from them. There is another complication in the test I'm doing: each capsule of Lectin Lock contains 25 mg of pepsin - an enzyme normally secreted in the stomach that breaks down proteins. So part of its benefit may come from breaking down some of the lectins (which are a type of protein) before they have the chance to attach to the gut walls. Maybe if Lectin Lock works, I'll switch to the DEFLECT product for a while, or even try pepsin by itself.

I doubt if any researchers would go through the time and expense of doing a trial unless there were some kind of evidence that it could be successful. So I'm trying to provide one small piece of evidence - and clear up in the process. We all know that many people with p have an intolerance to certain foods and could get better by avoiding those foods - if they knew exactly which foods to avoid and had the discipline to do it. By understanding more about what causes a food intolerance, and what some other options might be (lectin binding, in particular), hopefully we'll have another possibility for dealing with our psoriasis.

I didn't realize until two days ago how much snacking I've been doing! I don't eat large meals, but have developed a habit of "grazing" throughout the day. The only hard part of this test is changing my eating habit to 3 meals a day and 2 snacks.

DottieD

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** Originally posted by stewartintheUK **

THE DEFLECT range is based on blood type diet (ie type a , b, o etc)> The price is roughly the same as LECTIN LOCK $35).

Here is a page about the product, and links to each type of tablet.
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2008/08/10/the-deflect-line-o f-lectin-blocking-form?blog=26

There is four types of tablet DEFLECT AB (for type 'AB') » DEFLECT A (for type 'A') » DEFLECT B (for type 'B')
» DEFLECT O (for type 'O'). Perhaps one of them provides the most u"universal" coverage if one does not wish to prescrie to the blood type theory ?

BLOOD TYPE O
http://www.4yourtype.com/sup_fact_htms/BT004O_SFB.htm

BLOOD TYPE AB
http://www.4yourtype.com/sup_fact_htms/BT004AB_SFB.htm

BLOOD TYPE A:
http://www.4yourtype.com/sup_fact_htms/BT004A_SFB.htm

BLOOD TYPE B:
http://www.4yourtype.com/sup_fact_htms/BT004B_SFB.htm

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** Originally posted by woejoe **

Your post is very informative. Just make sure you document your diet change,what you are eating, your suppliments that you are using, and log what your doing in a daily journal. You will haft to keep track of everything you do daily. I have had Psoriasis for many years and hope your lectin research will help in finding out some of the causes of Psoriasis.
I also will be doing a 6 month diet change and seeing if my Psoriasis gets better.

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