Tincture of Iodine

** Originally posted by pictorex **

The reason psoriasis is considered to be somewhat but not actually curable is because its true cause is not understood. Prof. Tullio Simonicini has concluded that the cause of psoriasis is a fungus and found that it responds to treatment with tincture of iodine. I have had chronic psoriasis on my elbows, upper arms and lower legs for more than twenty years. At times I could not even go to public swimming pools because the condition was so unsightly. I started applying tincture of iodine on 2. January 2009 and the condition was basically cured within ten days. Of course, it takes somewhat longer for the skin to recover completely. I applied the tincture multiple times a day for four to five days, until the surface of the skin peeled off, revealing healthy, psoriais-free skin underneath; one must be careful in letting it peel by itself and not force the peeling. A long bath will help the peeling process without causing damage to healthy skin. In some isolated spots the fungus may not be killed completely with the first treatment. In such a case wait about a week before reapplying the treatment. By all indications this is a permanent cure. This is the first time in over twenty years that I have been entirely psoriasis-free. One last remark: you need to use the classic old-fashioned tincture of iodine that dyes your skin deep purple. Iodine povidone solution is not effective at all.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Thats why it says poison on the bottle..one small bottle, 30ml is enough to be fatal to a child

a drop of two in drinking water is safe...but if a small bottle gets into the wrong hands...

so watch out...

Tincture of iodine is suitable for topical application only. It is a poison if taken internally. Thank you for pointing this out.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

May I suggest that we stay on topic? Although Simonicini claims that topical application of tincture of iodine is effective for skin cancer as well, I would rather not enter into a discussion on this. This is not the forum for such a discussion and furthermore, I have no personal experience to share in this regard. Tincture of iodine is indicated as a topical disinfectant. It used to be commonly available, but has gone out of fashion mainly due to cosmetic considerations--it temporarily stains the skin--and because there are other disinfectants for such things, e.g., hydrogen peroxide, which do not stain the skin and work just as well. Tincture of iodine is of course a poison if taken internally, but not when applied topically to small cuts and scrapes -- or to psoriasis plaques. It does not burn or irritate healthy skin unless applied to the same spot repeatedly -- so there is no reason to worry if, when applying it to your psoriasis plaques, a few drops run off and stain healthy skin. But be very careful in applying it to your face and especially the area around the eyes. The skin on your face is much more sensitive than the skin on your arms and legs, for example.

As for availability, I tried about ten pharmacies here in Brussels before finding one that stocked it. They generally stock only stock betadine (povidone iodine) but that is not effective for psoriasis. I don't know about the UK, but in Belgium the pharmacist is generally willing to order it for you and can supply it later the same day or the next.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

If this is a supposed cure for Psoriasis why doesn't everyone know about it. It sounds dangerous and unhealthy!

Why this treatment is not better known is hard to say. I read about it on Dr. Simonicini's site, where he mentions it only in passing, his main focus being skin cancer -- which is not the topic of this discussion.

As to the treatment being dangerous, tincture of iodine is indicated as a local topical disinfectant and is not dangerous when applied as directed. It is of course a poison when taken internally. When used to treat psoriasis, it should be applied only to the plaques, repeatedly, and for four to five days -- until the crust falls off, peels off, or washes off. Thus the application of tincture of iodine is restricted both in terms of space (the area of the skin to which it is applied is generally very small) and in terms of time (a few days). It must be applied with caution, only to the affected areas and only to the plaque or crust. It is not to be applied to the healthy skin that forms underneath the crust and emerges within four to five days, i.e. after the crust has come off. This new healthy skin is initially very sensitive and should be protected with moisturizer. The ideal moisturizer in my experience is pure glycerine. This should be applied to the newly formed healthy skin until the skin matures, otherwise there is a danger of the new skin drying out and cracking.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Brandi, its obvious you didn't read the link...

intact skin

Irritant contact dermatitis caused by povidone-iodine
has been reported, (Okano, 1989). Liberal application
of the tincture or povidone-iodine to the skin resulted
in significant plasma and urine iodine levels and may
cause systemic iodine toxicity (Luckhardt et al., 1920;
Smerdely et al., 1989; Pyati et al., 1977; Chabrolle &
Rossier, 1978; Coakley et al., 1989; L'Allemand et al.,
1987; Dantzigen et al., 1987; Schoenberger & Grim,
1982).

Injured skin (one could assume psoriasis is injured skin)

Continuous postoperative wound irrigation with
povidone-iodine resulted in death of a patient. Toxic
manifestations of systemic iodine absorption appeared
to cause the death, (D'Auria et al., 1990; Glick et
al., 1985).

In ones wildest imagination, could one possibly envision some poor soul covering his or her plaques with this stuff for days hoping for some relief only to find they are being poisoned by it..The occasional use as in the good old days for a cut or sliver or to eliminate microbes before surgery is not what i am talking about.

I am concerned about a desperate attempt by a vulnerable reader to find some relief by covering large lesions with iodine or a child getting into it. I do believe in a few alternatives or as they get accepted ..CAM. and i don't not know if iodine helps or not but from his other beliefs i have to question it....as Szorzi suggests, use some caution and research..and not just because something is natural or suggested on a forum...do some careful research.....and ask a doctor if there is doubt...he may not believe something will work and poo poo it as internet babble.....but at least he will tell you of any known risks. I feel this way about any CAM or prescribed medicine ..look before you leap.

Thanks for the warnings. The fundamental axiom of medicine as formulated by Hippocrates is "primum non nocere" -- "first of all, do no harm". Therefore exercise caution and common sense. Iodine like many vitamins and minerals is essential for health but excessive amounts are harmful (this is also true for vitamin A and D, which are toxic in sufficiently high doses, but at the same time essential for life). When tincture of iodine is applied to the skin, the iodine is absorbed and can correct an iodine deficiency. In fact one test for iodine deficiency involves watching how quickly a staining of the skin with tincture of iodine will disappear. If the stain disappears within a couple of hours, this indicates that the body is taking up the iodine quickly due to a deficiency. Generally the staining will take 12-24 hours to disappear completely, when applied to healthy skin. An excess of iodine absorbed through the skin can be harmful. However we are talking about applying tincture of iodine (not betadine) locally to areas of the skin affected by psoriasis, and not for extended periods, but only for the few days it takes for the plaque to crust over and for the crust to fall off, once new healthy skin has formed underneath. It should not be applied to the newly formed healthy skin after the crust has peeled. Instead, a moisturizer such as glycerine should be applied until the newly formed skin matures.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

So is it safe to use on skin? I have read on some websites people applying it to skin for some sort of test, can't remember what it was for. And for the side effects, I read they were very rare but it didn't seem anything too awful.

The test you have in mind is probably the absorption test, where you stain a patch of healthy skin with tincture of iodine and measure the time it takes for the staining to disappear. If the individual is iodine deficient, the stain will disappear within a couple of hours, normally the staining should disappear in 12-24 hours. If you have large parts of your body affected by psoriasis plaques, you can treat them successively, not all at once, in order to avoid excess systemic absorption of iodine.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Kind of scary that they wash your skin in this before surgery!

You're talking about betadine, not tincture of iodine. Betadine is ok as a disinfectant, but it will not kill the psoriasis fungus.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Its worth a try! Where can you buy this type of iodine? Can it be used on the scalp?

If your pharmacy doesn't stock tincture of iodine they can usually order it for you. It is very inexpensive. I have posted methods of application elsewhere on this site. It can be applied to the scalp, but if you have hair you should be aware that it will color it a deep reddish brown. It is hard to apply it to the scalp without it getting into the hair. But these are just cosmetic considerations. When applied to psoriasis plaques on the scalp, these will crust over almost immediately and upon repeated application with the tincture will fall off within a few days, just as elsewhere on the body. The new healthy skin that is exposed after the crust falls off or peels off or washes off, as the case may be, should not be treated with tincture of iodine any more, but with a moisturizer, such as pure glycerine, to avoid the newly formed skin from cracking before it has a chance to mature. When applying iodine tincture (again betadine is ineffective for this purpose), be very careful not to let it drip into your eyes. Apply repeatedly over four to five days, but only to the affected areas. Stop the application once peeling starts. On the scalp, it is better and safer if someone else does the application for you.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Make up your mind - is it curable or not?

It certainly cured my own case. I had psoriasis on and around my elbows, upper arms and also on my legs for about twenty years, without remission. It would wax and wane, but never entirely disappear -- until I applied the treatment I have described elsewhere on this thread at the beginning of January. I have been entirely free of psoriasis since the middle of January, i.e., for two months. I consider my case to be a demonstration of Dr. Simonicini's finding that psoriasis is really a type of fungal infection. However ordinary topical antifungal cremes are not effective. The fact is that in order to talk about a cure we should have a larger data set, and this is the purpose of these postings--to encourage sufferers with various types of the disease to try the treatment, using all of the precautions indicated on the bottle and emphasized by me elsewhere in these postings, and report on their results. These should be evident within a week or so. Here is a brief summary of suggested treatment: Apply tincture of iodine to affected areas only, in droplets, until a crust forms. Continue the application frequently throughout the day for four to five days until the crust comes off. At this point stop the treatment and apply a moisturizer (pure glycerine if possible) to the newly formed skin. I hope I have answered your question, if not, please let me know if I can clarify anything further.

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** Originally posted by ginnylee **

You're talking about betadine, not tincture of iodine. Betadine is ok as a disinfectant, but it will not kill the psoriasis fungus.

Um, psoriasis is NOT a fungus.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

Um, psoriasis is NOT a fungus.

That of course is the standard view, however the treatment with tincture of iodine is premised on the assumption that it is a fungus. And since the treatment is effective, as I can personally testify, this appears to be a strong indication that psoriasis is in fact a fungus. The standard view that it is the rapid growth of skin cells due to an unknown cause is not a satisfactory explanation, in fact it is no explanation at all, but an attempt at a description of the phenomenon. The observed presence of T-cells in the lesions indicates that the body is trying to fight off an invader of some type. Fungal infections are typically persistent and symbiotic, unlike viral or bacterial infections, which tend to spread rapidly and subside rapidly. The tincture of iodine is effective against a wide spectrum of microbes, so the fact that it is effective against psoriasis does not prove that psoriasis is a fungus. However, my understanding is that Dr. Simoncini decided to treat psoriasis with tincture of iodine precisely based on his conclusion that psoriasis is a fungus.

Recall that the medical profession resisted for almost a decade evidence that stomach ulcers are caused by a bacterium (Helicobacter pylori) and insisted that they are due to stress and genetic predisposition. Are you sure that was the last time the medical profession was wrong about the cause of a common disease?

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** Originally posted by bjmacc **

nina...no one is bashing the poster here so that argument is lame..

but i am bashing the Dr who promotes the treatment ...lets look at the logic...

checking his credibility, he also claims healing 99% of breast cancer and bladder cancer? Other then a slap in the face to any family or person who has had to deal with those diseases...here is a little about the good Doctors theories

http://www.cancertreatmentwatch.org/reports/simoncini.shtml

Doesn't that cast some doubt in ones mind as to his other theories?..doesn't some kind of bell go off?

ok, so lets take the leap and assume he gets it right once.....think about iodine's history then

The fact that iodine was discovered in 1811 and its not reasonable to assume it has been tried in every way shape or form since and this is first time we know it as effective for psoriasis stretches the imagination...does it sound logical?...over two hundred years of nostrums and potions ..from primitive through modern medicine worldwide often dealing with iodine in some form and only now we discover it works for psoriasis by simple topical application?...doesn't that seem incongruous with common sense?

i don't suggest the poster isn't honest, ..it may be coincidence, i don't know.

well thats my 2cents...the only bashing here is leaps of logic.

i see a similar thread is going on in the uk forum http://www.psoriasis-help.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35503.0.html

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** Originally posted by szorzi **

Yes, as Dr. Simoncini has found, psoriasis is a fungus,

There is no cure for psoriasis - only clearing or remission. Psoriasis is NOT a fungus, but it does sometimes co-exist with fungus.

If a fungal infection is what is triggering your P, then clearing up the fungus will possibly clear the P as well.

Just as diet can clear P if a food allergy or sensitivity is what is triggering your P. Or just as an antibiotic can clear P if strep is what is triggering your P. None of these are cures for P; they are cures for an underlying condition that is triggering the P in isolated cases.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

nina...no one is bashing the poster here so that argument is lame..

but i am bashing the Dr who promotes the treatment ...lets look at the logic...

checking his credibility, he also claims healing 99% of breast cancer and bladder cancer? Other then a slap in the face to any family or person who has had to deal with those diseases...here is a little about the good Doctors theories

http://www.cancertreatmentwatch.org/reports/simoncini.shtml

Doesn't that cast some doubt in ones mind as to his other theories?..doesn't some kind of bell go off?

ok, so lets take the leap and assume he gets it right once.....think about iodine's history then

The fact that iodine was discovered in 1811 and its not unreasonable to assume has been tried in every way shape or form since and this is first time we know it as effective for psoriasis stretches the imagination...does it sound logical?...over two hundred years of nostrums and potions ..from primitive through modern medicine worldwide often dealing with iodine in some form and only now we discover it works for psoriasis by simple topical application?...doesn't that seem incongruous with common sense?

i don't suggest the poster isn't honest, ..it may be coincidence, i don't know.

well thats my 2cents...the only bashing here is leaps of logic.

You certainly have a point. I was also quite skeptical and it took me about half a year after learning about the treatment before I took it seriously enough to try it on myself. What impressed me about Simoncini's conclusion that psoriasis is a fungus (and please let's concentrate on that--his other theories are not relevant to this discussion and would take us far off-topic) and treatable with tincture of iodine is, firstly, that he at least came up with a plausible hypothesis as to the cause, something which still eludes the rest of the medical profession. His conclusion may be wrong, but it is falsifiable if the treatment suggested based on that hypothesis fails. The second thing that impressed me was that he wasn't selling any expensive potions or exotic treatments. He did not standto make a red cent with his hypothesis, since tincture of iodine is an age old commonly available remedy and extremely inexpensive. That did not mean he was right, but it meant that he wasn't a snake-oil salesman. As to why the treatment was not discovered before, I don't really have a a good answer to that, but it should be recalled that many treatments that used to be common knowledge have fallen out of usage over the years. One would have to do research in old almanacs and such to see if this treatment is really new. So you are right, there are a priori reasons to be skeptical, but there are also a few a priori reasons for a more positive attitude. For me there is also the a posteriori consideration that the treatment worked precisely as described.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

There is no cure for psoriasis - only clearing or remission. Psoriasis is NOT a fungus, but it does sometimes co-exist with fungus.

If a fungal infection is what is triggering your P, then clearing up the fungus will possibly clear the P as well.

Just as diet can clear P if a food allergy or sensitivity is what is triggering your P. Or just as an antibiotic can clear P if strep is what is triggering your P. None of these are cures for P; they are cures for an underlying condition that is triggering the P in isolated cases.

Yes Szorzi, that is the standard view of the medical profession, but as I have pointed out in another message on this thread, the medical profession has been wrong before, for example on the cause of stomach ulcers, which were also incurable, could only go into remission, usually with a strict diet, were associated with a genetic predisposition and often triggered by stress. When two Australian physicians discovered the true cause of stomach ulcers, namely the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the medical profession fought the discovery tooth and nail for a decade and practically excommunicated them. Eventually they received the Nobel prize for their discovery (2005).

This does not mean of course that the medical profession must necessarily be wrong about psoriasis, only that it could be wrong. One indication that it is wrong is that to this day it does not know the cause or the cure. This is what one would expect if the underlying hypothesis were incorrect.

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** Originally posted by szorzi **

This is what one would expect if the underlying hypothesis were incorrect.

But what do you think of my hypothesis? Doesn't it make just as much sense? That in some cases, including yours, the P is being triggered by fungus and therefore treating the fungus will clear the P. If all P were caused by a fungus, why would other treatments clear it as well?

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** Originally posted by vinnylid **

I didn't start losing my toenails until I developed Psoriatic Arthritis. Is it psoriasis or fungus that is destroying them? Maybe I'll try Iodine. What do i have to lose?

vinnylid

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** Originally posted by bjmacc **

well, if you are inclined, at least report back to us because i would certainly like to know.

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** Originally posted by daytonaflyer **

Tincture of Iodine applied to many types of skin blemishes causes them to dry up and flake off. It is often used for moles, skin tags, ulcers, pimples, and now apparently psoriasis. That doesn't mean that these things are caused by fungus, it means that tincture of iodine has an effect on the skin when applied topically which causes the skin to die, giving chance for new skin to grow beneath. If your P is still active, it will return eventually. If you have removed the factors that caused your P to begin, it may not come back at all.

I am experiencing a similar situation right now using steroids, not iodine. I got P about 5 years ago after I had been experiencing years of extreme stress and disappointment in my life and career. Not coincidentally, that's when I was diagnosed with P, and that's when it spread the most. Back then, topical steroids worked briefly, but the P soon came back.

Now I am much happier, in a good job, financially stable, and with very little stress in my life. I again tried topical steroids recently, and the P is not returning in most of the areas where topical steroids were used. I think that we will find that tincture of iodine will cause everybody's skin to dry and flake off, but that some will have their P return more rapidly than others. I might, however, try it on my knuckles where I've had little success with topical steroids.

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** Originally posted by pictorex **

But what do you think of my hypothesis? Doesn't it make just as much sense? That in some cases, including yours, the P is being triggered by fungus and therefore treating the fungus will clear the P. If all P were caused by a fungus, why would other treatments clear it as well?

Assuming that a fungal infection is the cause, it is plausible that a diet that deprives the fungus of the nutrients on which it thrives would suppress it somewhat. I can also see how stress could make the immune system less effective in fighting it off.

In any event, granted that both hypotheses are plausible, how can we establish which one is true? How can it tell if my psoriasis is only in remission or gone for good? If in remission would it still be visible at some level? Or can I consider it gone for good if it does not reappear within six months or a year? What I am getting at, what are the criteria to distinguish between clearing and curing? Of course by standard medical opinion the condition is incurable, so the latter possibility is ruled out a priori. What it then boils down to, is standard medical opinion falsifiable?

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** Originally posted by stewartintheUK **

Hya

Could you give us advice onhow much iodine is to be used on say a large area? say a forearm (from elbow to wrist)? Is it ever diluted?

I have to say that i dont agree with the steroid/iodine compairson as the mechanism of the two are entirely differemt. really only a few more trials can confirm this though. Once again BJmac is totally right that thismust be done carefully and i would be VERY careful about applying it to the face and scalp and its quite easy for it to get into the eye.(Ihave had this when applying jharmless oil it can still find a way).

I have a feelign iodine cannot be got without prescription int he UK though, it is however freely avaiable to people who wok in labs etc.

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