Sulfur treatment vs steriod (useless)

** Originally posted by yang81696 **

has anyone tried the sulfur treatment??
its been used for hundreds of years... but not sure if anyone is actually
trying it...

and what are the results?

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17 replies. Join the discussion

** Originally posted by RichJ **

hi yang81696,
sorry i can't help much but welcome to the p family. you will meet some of the wounderful people on here and will find alot of great info. welcome and nice to meet you.

have a good day all

richard

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** Originally posted by WhoaTrigger **

I've never heard of the sulphur treatment and I've been around for hundreds of years too (sometimes it feels that way). Please tell more about it.

My limited knowledge of all things mineral and how they influence the body led me to look it up.

"Sulphur is known as the beauty mineral, growth promoter, keeps hair glossy and complexion clear, works with B complex vitamins, acts as an oxidizing agent, essential for protein absorption, counteracts acidosis, assists growth in children, normal function of heart muscles. Must be balanced with phosphorus, required for proper disgestion, metabolism of carbohydrates, influences liver, promotes bile secretion, regulates nerve impulses, cell formation, essential in the stimulation of egg and sperm production.

Therapeutic Uses: Digestion, blood purifier, hepatitis, dandruff, acne, depression, counteracts acidosis, maintains healthy hair, skin and nails.

Principal Sources:
Foods: Kale, cabbage, cauliflower, horse radish, brussel sprouts, watercress, chervil, parsley, celery, fish, eggs, dried beans, nuts.
Herbs: Alfalfa, Kelp, Mullein, Barberry.

Sulphur Depletors: Cooking."

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** Originally posted by yang81696 **

yes, i was researching too.. and it stated that 'sulfur' was coming back as a treatment for "P" because it is non-toxic compared to the alternatives out there prescribed to "P" people... I guess the ancient egyptians knew what they were doing by using sulfur...

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** Originally posted by AnnieB **

Sulfasalazine is a sulfa drug that is sometimes prescribed for P. It is more often prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and crohn's disease. A few people have posted about it on the boards. Many people have the side effect of nausea, which is a bummer.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/medmaster/a682204.html

Sulfasalazine

Sulfasalazine does not have FDA approval for the treatment of psoriasis but is highly effective in selected patients. It is typically given in dosages of 3 to 4 g daily. In one study, over 25% of patients given sulfasalazine stopped the treatment because of side effects (cutaneous eruptions or nausea). In clinical practice, results have been less promising than in studies.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/535231

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** Originally posted by yang81696 **

my next question is that can i just buy sulphur at the pharmacy and apply it on my skin? or not anymore? i think pharmacy stop selling sulphur... but if was able to obtain sulphur... how much should i apply to skin? probably mix it with olive oil before applying it... (yes sulphur is one of the ingreadiants to make gunpowder...) (and no, i'm not going to use gunpowder on my skin... :) (hahah) )

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** Originally posted by Dulane **

Sulphur was also used to kill bacteria on dried fruit. I can't say I've read about putting it on your skin tho.

:confused:

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** Originally posted by GitOverIt **

sulfa and sulphur are not the same.....I remember looking this up years ago because I had a mild reaction to sulfa....here is the explanation I found

Question: Are sulfa and sulphur related? I am allergic to sulfa. If I were to use sulphur powder, would it cause a reaction similar to that of sulfa? Sulphur can be found in meat, dairy and vegetables, so I would think it should be safe.
Answer: not related (although sulfa contains sulfur) sulfa is an antibiotic sulfur is a basic chemical(halogen) and the foundation of the "living" chemical building blocks of our life no one can be allergic to sulfur; many folks are allergic to sulfa do not worry about sulfur - you are made of it - it is NOT the problem

as for using sulphur? the MSM is the best to use for ingesting or using as a cream/lotion
It is in most arthritis combo lotion/supplements
also good for psoriasis...do a google search

http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:8bei3nf_2IQJ:www.newdaynews.com/health /index.cgi/noframes/read/224+MSM+sulphur+psoriasis&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us &ie=UTF-8

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** Originally posted by AnnieB **

Yeah, sulfa drugs are not the same as sulfur. And why would you put that on your skin when it is not suggested for psoriasis (at least I have never heard of it) and there are SO MANY other things to try?

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** Originally posted by GitOverIt **

has anyone tried the sulfur treatment??
its been used for hundreds of years... but not sure if anyone is actually
trying it...

and what are the results?

And why would you put that on your skin when it is not suggested for psoriasis (at least I have never heard of it) and there are SO MANY other things to try?

possibly because Yang asked! and we are giving our thoughts on it since this is the CAM forum!

we are made up of sulphur so if there is an imbalance maybe the results would be skin problems! I don't know...just trying to show what the connection might be!

MSM is the organic version of sulphur

THE POWER OF MSM SULPHUR
Take a few moments to read about MSM Sulphur!

MSM stands for methylsulfonylmethane. MSM is an organic sulfur compound that exists to some extent in all living things. MSM is a basic nutrient required for the proper functioning of the body. Most people are deficient in this nutrient.

Sulphur is responsible for the ionic exchange within the sodium-potassium pump in the cell. Sulphur is needed to maintain cell membrane permeability. This is important to ensure that nutrients are delivered into the cell and toxins and other waste products can exit. A lack of sulphur prevents the transport of free radicals, chemicals and foreign particles out of the cells, which, if not excreted, can lead to many allergic reactions such as Asthma, ear nose and throat
infections, hay fever, headaches, fatigue and gastrointestinal problems.

Sulphur is a component of insulin, the very important hormone that regulates the uptake of glucose by cells for use as energy. A lack of
sulphur can result in low insulin production or cell resistance to insulin which in turn brings about excess blood sugar leading to diabetes. Sulphur is also needed for thiamine and biotin which are also needed for normal carbohydrate metabolism. Sulphur plays a part in tissue respiration, the process whereby oxygen is used to build new cells. A lack of sulphur can lead to replaced cells being dysfunctional and causing serious health related problems. Sulphur will help the immune system inhibit chemical carcinogens.

Sulphur is a required structural mineral found in the proteins of most tissues in the body such as the skin, blood vessels, organs, hair and nails. Sulphur makes up the flexible disulphide bonds within protein structure in tissues providing elasticity and movement. Sulphur is also necessary for healing and repair of these tissues from internal injury and free radical damage. MSM contributes to the production of ground substance (muccopolysaccharides) which keeps connective tissue intact. Researchers claim that MSM can help improve joint flexibility, reduce stiffness, swelling and pain, improve circulation and break up calcium deposits or water bonds in the synovial fluid.

more on this article at this link


http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:8bei3nf_2IQJ:www.newdaynews.com/health /index.cgi/noframes/read/224+MSM+sulphur+psoriasis&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us &ie=UTF-8

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** Originally posted by AnnieB **

I was asking the original poster why he would apply it topically. I understand that people take MSM for various ailments, but even the folks who sell it tend to mention arthritis, and don't say much about psoriasis. Here is some MSM info:

http://ww2.arthritis.org/resources/arthritistoday/1999_archives/1999_11_12e xplorations.asp

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** Originally posted by mcordy77 **

I was asking the original poster why he would apply it topically.

because sulfur is in many different types of skin care lotions, perhaps?

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** Originally posted by nesielheum **

Sulfur: an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic element; best known in yellow crystals; occurs in many sulphide and sulphate minerals and even in native form (especially in volcanic regions)
From what I can tell, not much value in treating psoriasis.

Sulfates: Chemical derivatives of sulfuric acid; can be regarded as being formed by neutralizing sulfuric acid by an appropriate base, for example, reaction with NaOH forms sodium sulfate. Sulfates are a large component of seawater and, hence, sea-salt aerosol.

Here is a little sulfate trivia concerning one of a long line of sulfates.

8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate is the main active ingredient in a comonly used livestock OTC (and oft used by psoriatics).

The OTC..........Bag Balm :)

What is this active ingredient?

8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate, is one of a family of coal tar derivatives first manufactured in 1899. The compounds from which 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate is made are known as quinolines and isoquinolines, and are similar in chemical structure to benzene rings.

Good old coal tar :) I always wondered why Bag Balm worked (a little) :o

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** Originally posted by AnnieB **

I never knew they put sulfur in skin care products but I just did a search and it does pop in up in a number of anti-acne creams, soaps, etc. Has anyone ever used it? Many of them say they use "volcanic sulfur". It is said to exfolliating so I wonder if that is good or bad for P?

Sulfur: An important mineral component of vitamin B1 and of several essential amino acids. Sulfur is particularly necessary for the body's production of collagen, which helps to form connective tissue. Sulfur is also a component of keratin, the chief ingredient in hair, skin, and nails. By controlling bacteria and exfoliating the skin, sulfur is a popular acne treatment. Sulfur is thought to dissolve the top layer of dry, dead cells and slow down oil-gland activity. The highest concentration of sulfur in over-the-counter medication is 10 percent. Sulfur may cause a mild sensitivity and allergic reactions, and can irritate the eyes. Discontinue use if irritation occurs.

http://skincarerx.org/dictpg2.html

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** Originally posted by Actress **

I tried a sulfa pill last year for my p. I found out that I am extreamly allergic to it. I had a constant upset stomach, nausea, vomitting, body aches, stiff neck, and severe fatigue. If it works for some, great. But take my advise, if you try it, watch for these issues and immediatly stop it if you have any problems and call your doctor!

~amber.

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** Originally posted by nesielheum **

I am not sure how sulphur is administered as a homeopathic treatment, but the medical-clinic.org website has this to say about sulphur.

Sulphur
Sulphur is derived from the mineral sulphur

Treatment Use
Sulphur is useful when any of the following are indicated:

Mental and emotional aspects

Forgetfulness
Inability to think clearly
Laziness
Irritability
Self- centredness and selfishness
Argumentative
Aggressive tendencies
Claustrophobia
Fear of heights (vertigo)
Fear of oppression
Bulimia
Insomnia
Post-menopausal depression
Alcoholism
Addiction to smoking
Lack of willpower


Physical aspects

Burning, itching skin
Eczema, dermatitis, psoriasis
Thrush
Nappy rash
Catarrh
Constipation
Diarrhea
Indigestion
Loss of appetite
Haemorrhoids
Lower back pain
Gout
Headaches
Conjunctivitis
Red, sore and itchy eyes
Offensive body odour
Hair loss
Dry, itchy scalp
Sore throats

Modalities

Better: for warm, fresh air.
Worse: early mornings and late nights; damp, cold weather; washing; prolonged sitting and standing

Treatment Tips
Skin problems, particularly where the skin is red and itchy (such as eczema), respond well to this remedy. It is also a good general remedy for detoxification.

I get the feeling that the photo below (posted on the medical-clinic.org website) is the author of the medical-clinic.org's medical blog.

Medical clinic blog provides coverage of current health news. You will find insightful discussion and commentary on health issues including fitness, diseases, medicines, women's health, nutritional information and more...

This guy looks so very familiar???

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** Originally posted by yang81696 **

so.. does that mean that the ancient Egyptians just applied raw sulphur on patients skin? and washed it out? or did they use it as a bath to let it soothe the skin? or ??? because it seems like sulphur and sulphate are two different things..
just wondering? if i could just buy some sulphur from walmart gardening and use it? or should we get it from our doctor who probably will only prescribe the pill... :(

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** Originally posted by GitOverIt **

MSM is the organic sulphur to be used.......you can buy itin the powdered version to make your own paste, lotion, cream etc.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=sulphur+MSM+powder

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