Psoriasis and Hives

** Originally posted by zedanny **

Hi anyone know if Psoriasis and Hives ever been mistaken for each other?
I had hives several times seance I was a kid. I went to a derm about a year 1/2 ago and he said I have Psoriasis . I have treaded as P all the time with out any luck just seemed to spread more.
Well I took benadryl Allergy a few days ago and my arms are clearing up the itching has pretty well stopped.My arms were big red welts with very light scaling. now there clear.
I was looking at pictures of Hives on the net and thought that looks just like my Psoriasis .I know that Bendryil is what they give you for treating hives. Anyway thank you

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** Originally posted by MikeK **

Hi Danny,

I'm not a doctor, but from what I understand hives is usually a temporary condition (it may come and go) that's usually brought on by something like allergic reaction: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hives-and-angioedema/DS00313

My psoriasis never comes and goes. It's always there.

The best way to know exactly what's going on with your skin is to ask your derm to take either a biopsy or a scraping of your skin. A biopsy sounds scary, because it's usually associated with cancer, but biopsies can and should be used to diagnose any number of skin conditions -- including psoriasis. Because of the risk of the Koebner effect, most derms usually diagnose psoriasis via a visual examination. They'll sometimes order a scraping (again, because of the risk of the Koebner effect) before they'll order a biopsy. In the case of a scraping, the dermatologist will take an instrument that looks like a tongue depressor and scrape some of the diseased skin onto a slide so it can be examined under a microscope. In the case of the biopsy, the derm will use an instrument and a local anesthetic to remove several small pieces of skin (you may or may not need stitches) so they can be sent to a laboratory for analysis. Talk to your doctor. Ask for either a scraping or a biopsy. That way you'll know exactly what's going on with your skin. (I've had several scrapings -- usually to confirm that something was not psoriasis -- and one biopsy during my 40 year battle with psoriasis.)

BTW, the Koebner ( I like to say that you know that something is not good when they name it after someone :rolleyes: ) effect means that any injury to an existing patch of psoriasis can make that psoriasis get worse. The Keobner effect can also mean that an injury to a previously healthy patch of skin can cause that a new patch of psoriasis to develop. Some derms don't like to order biopsies unless it's absolutely necessary, because a biopsy is a form of injury and can result in the Keobner effect. Not every patient suffers from the Koebner effect. (I usually don't suffer from it.) And, not every injury results in the Koebner effect. Here's a link to a previous discussion about the Koebner effect: http://www.psoriasis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=10988

A couple of months ago, I posted an article about a doctor who suffered for years from a rash and a horrible itch. He went went from doctor to doctor and kept getting misdiagnosed. The last doctor ordered a scraping. It turned out the the patient had scabies! Which is very easy to treat. If something like that can happen to a doctor, then it can happen to any one of us. (I'm not saying that you have scabies, but this is a good example of how a scraping can be used to correctly diagnose a problem.) Here's a link to thread and the article: http://www.psoriasis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=32020&highlight=itch.

I hope this helps.

Mike

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** Originally posted by zedanny **

Thanks Mike I guess I have to much time to thank. Lol

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** Originally posted by DALEG **

Danny....I've had hives but never associated it with p.........

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** Originally posted by zedanny **

I was just curious my arms hasn't been clear for 6 months. Now they are the itching has all but stopped with the benidral pills.I can breath again. will keep you all informed .I feel pretty darn good for the first time in a year.

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** Originally posted by stametst **

I was just curious my arms hasn't been clear for 6 months. Now they are the itching has all but stopped with the benidral pills.I can breath again. will keep you all informed .I feel pretty darn good for the first time in a year.

I use to have hives but never gave it any thought to psoriasis. So many things I did not think about, and am starting to ask if something are related. Amazing!

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** Originally posted by NIlla **

I get hives almost daily.... hyper sensitive too many foods. Although i know the hives symptoms themselves are not related to P, I feel they are definately associated systemically.. for me anyhow..

Kevin

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** Originally posted by zedanny **

I don't know weather there's a connection or not I can't remember when I had a good day in the last two years. So I decided to take Benadryl allergy three day's ago and I really feel good.I have forgotten what it was like to feel good.

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** Originally posted by DEBAK **

Keep in mind that P is an alteration or disfunction in our immune system and therefore it is most likely that we develop more allergies as a result of this disfunction. I for sure have developed several allergies since having P. So it would not be unheard of that you have BOTH P and allergies. Even though your arms have cleared with the use of benadry...keep a close eye on you other P areas...my derm says that benadryl will make P worse and she has me using CLARITIN for itching which I must say works better than the prescribed Atarax I used to take...by the way Atarax is one of the things I have developed an allergy to.

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