Psoriasis and Dairy

** Originally posted by EllieMarianna **

Hi! I use Dovobet to to treat my P. I have noticed it flares up when I eat dairy, which is almost every day. I am hoping to go completely dairy free and see how it reacts, but I was wondering if anyone else on this diet can still consume lactose free dairy products?

Report post

14 replies. Join the discussion

** Originally posted by lazza **

Hi, welcome. Total elimination of dairy has done wonders for my psoriasis but I fear trying lactose-free products. Why? Because I believe dairy sensitivity means sensitivity to casein (milk protein). I expect lactose free products still contain casein.

Of course lactose incolerance is far more common than casein sensitivity, and one can have both. But my experience dictates being casein sensitive means all but the smallest morsel of dairy causes the immune system distress, resulting in psoriasis flares. I will only eat something if I am 100% sure it does not contain dairy.

BTW, initially I went on a 99% dairy free diet and saw only a modest amount of improvement in my psoriasis. Eliminating the last bit of dairy made a huge difference. Yeah, it sucks .... I wish I could eat at least some dairy.


_Lazza

Report post

** Originally posted by MadCat **

I remember thinking back in 2007: how in Gods name am I going to survive without cheese and icecream. :o

I ate it every day and was positively addicted to the stuff.

During the Xmas 2010 period, I ate icecream for the first time in 3 years. Paid the price afterwards though. And nowadays if I consume cheese I get terrible arthritis type pains in my fingers as well.

Dairy was very detrimental to my P and IBD - so it is best that I avoid it 100%.

Once you come to terms with never eating it again and you have adapted your recipes, it is actually very easy to live without.

Avocado can be used instead of butter on baked potatoes or as a spread in sandwiches. Hot water, apple juice, soy milk, nut milk, hemp milk, oat milk, rice milk, coconut milk can all be used on cereal or in baking.

But if this does not suit, you could try experimenting. For example, many people who can’t eat dairy from cows...... can actually tolerate dairy from goats and sheep.

So maybe you could consume goats milk, cheese or yogurt instead.

Also bear in mind that the longer you avoid it the more sensitive you become. Whereas before I could get away with a little bit of cheese occasionally with no adverse effects, now the reaction is almost instantaneous.

Dairy is well-known to negatively affect P. My derm first told me about it more than 20 years ago now.

But given the social impact (dairy in some form, is in many processed foods), you need to weigh up the pros and cons of taking this route. It will mean a lot more home cooked foods.

Report post

** Originally posted by EllieMarianna **

Thank you for the replies! I feel the same - How will I cope, I love cheese, chocolate! I don't know what else to eat now I've stopped eating dairy lol! The cupboards are full of healthy food now but none of it appeals!

Report post

** Originally posted by light **

Would raw milk help? Some seem to do alright w/ high quality yogurt now and then. Homemade almond milk is great, and chia seeds are high in calcium. Best of luck.

Report post

** Originally posted by MadCat **

Would raw milk help?

I have heard that raw milk is fantastic for loads of different health issues.

Trouble is purchasing it. Unless you know a friendly farmer or you have a health co-op near you, the chances of tracking it down are pretty remote for most of the population.

There have been several cases in the USA where farmers supplying raw milk for health reasons, have been hounded and arrested by the nazi powers that be.

Our freedom of choice is slipping away again.

Report post

** Originally posted by MuchasManchas **

Also bear in mind that the longer you avoid it the more sensitive you become. Whereas before I could get away with a little bit of cheese occasionally with no adverse effects, now the reaction is almost instantaneous.

I couldn't agree more with this - extraordinarily frustrating but so very true! I cut wheat and gluten from my diet 10 months ago. A few months into it, if I entertained a teensy indulgence here and there, it wouldn't do much. Now, 10 months into it a whole different story. I recently broke down over the holidays and ate 2, thats right, I said 2 pigs in a blanket and BOOM!!! Super flare, angry, raw and unbearable itching!!! :( Oh well, it was punishment enough for me to never go near it again! Just remember, if it works for you, the sacrifice is worth it in the end :)

Report post

** Originally posted by MadCat **

http://

articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/12/31/us-government-sneaki ly-subsidizes-milk-industry.aspx

Article all about raw milk by Dr Mercola

Report post

** Originally posted by lazza **

Raw milk has casein, so if you have milk (casein) sensitivity it doesn't matter if the milk is raw or processed.


_Lazza

Report post

** Originally posted by lazza **

I couldn't agree more with this - extraordinarily frustrating but so very true! I cut wheat and gluten from my diet 10 months ago. A few months into it, if I entertained a teensy indulgence here and there, it wouldn't do much. Now, 10 months into it a whole different story. I recently broke down over the holidays and ate 2, thats right, I said 2 pigs in a blanket and BOOM!!! Super flare, angry, raw and unbearable itching!!! :( Oh well, it was punishment enough for me to never go near it again! Just remember, if it works for you, the sacrifice is worth it in the end :)

Interesting. I think the answer might has to do with the health of your colon, in particular your colon lining, at least for dairy and gluten sensitivity. Gluten sensitivity clearly involves a reaction when gluten attaches to a damaged colon lining. I would guess the colon lining can improve gradually through gluten avoidance and eating healthily. But if you carry on eating gluten the situation will just worsen. The only explanation of dairy (casein) sensitivity I've read theorizes that increased permeability of the colon lining allows pieces of casein to leech out. This causes the immune system to go haywire. Presumably going dairy free, eating healthily, and eliminating Candida (..these buggers burrow into the colon lining) would eventually heal the colon lining. FYI, increased intestinal permeability has been noted with other autoimmune disease sufferers in a couple of studies. However these studies do not claim this increased permeability has any direct bearing on the autoimmune condition let alone suggesting that by decreasing the permeability one can improve the condition. Yet this has been theorized by some.


_Lazza

Report post

** Originally posted by MadCat **

Raw milk has casein, so if you have milk (casein) sensitivity it doesn't matter if the milk is raw or processed.

I was not sure about this, as heard differently.

I suppose it is a moot point any way, since you would be hard pressed to get raw milk unless you knew a friendly farmer or owned your own cow.

They say that if you have intolerance to cheese, you can still eat aged cloth cheddar, as it contains less casein. Some of the traditional Italian ones are pretty good.

Certainly worked for me a couple of times, but not now. Plus aged cloth cheddar is extremely expensive $10.00 per 100g for a good quality one, so more of a treat than an everyday food. Besides that, it is quite strong and intense - a little goes a long long way.

Report post

** Originally posted by EllieMarianna **

I tried raw milk once, my friend's dad is a dairy farmer, it did exactly the same to my P as pasteurized milk.

That's expensive cheese! I live near where Cheddar was first created! They sell cave aged cheddar for half that, but unfortunately it also does the same - I end up raw and itching.

I had been detoxing, I had a bit of a binge on dairy and gluten free junk food and it made me feel awful - oops!

Report post

** Originally posted by AWeber **

Hi, welcome. Total elimination of dairy has done wonders for my psoriasis but I fear trying lactose-free products. Why? Because I believe dairy sensitivity means sensitivity to casein (milk protein). I expect lactose free products still contain casein.

Of course lactose incolerance is far more common than casein sensitivity, and one can have both. But my experience dictates being casein sensitive means all but the smallest morsel of dairy causes the immune system distress, resulting in psoriasis flares. I will only eat something if I am 100% sure it does not contain dairy.

BTW, initially I went on a 99% dairy free diet and saw only a modest amount of improvement in my psoriasis. Eliminating the last bit of dairy made a huge difference. Yeah, it sucks .... I wish I could eat at least some dairy.


_Lazza

Hi Lazza.

That's great you saw such great improvement after giving up dairy! Quick question: how long did it take for you to see such dramatic results? I've just gone dairy free (started last Saturday) and am wondering how long it will be until I see results. Thanks in advance!

Report post

** Originally posted by lazza **

When I first started I gave up dairy 99%, gluten 100%. My psoriasis was severe and it took about six weeks to see definite improvement. After about 10 weeks my condition was considerably better, maybe by some 40+%. At that time I eliminated what little dairy I had been eating. BAM! Within a day or two I noticed dramatic improvement which continued over several weeks.

I think when I started my body was "soaked" in inflammation. It took time for this to "drain out". Once this extreme amount of inflammation is gone I was able to enjoy quicker results. And so if you psoriasis is an angry mess you need to be patient.


_Lazza

Report post

** Originally posted by AWeber **

When I first started I gave up dairy 99%, gluten 100%. My psoriasis was severe and it took about six weeks to see definite improvement. After about 10 weeks my condition was considerably better, maybe by some 40+%. At that time I eliminated what little dairy I had been eating. BAM! Within a day or two I noticed dramatic improvement which continued over several weeks.

I think when I started my body was "soaked" in inflammation. It took time for this to "drain out". Once this extreme amount of inflammation is gone I was able to enjoy quicker results. And so if you psoriasis is an angry mess you need to be patient.


_Lazza

Hmm, yup, I'd say I'm pretty inflamed, although it's just my scalp. Thanks for providing your timeline. I heard that it takes at least two weeks for any dairy to leave the body, so I have a ways to go. It's just hard to wait! My scalp is a mess, itchy and flaking. It's quite uncomfortable, but it will be worth it in the long run if it turns out dairy is my trigger. Thanks again!

Report post

This discussion is closed to replies. We close all discussions after 90 days.

If there's something you'd like to discuss, click below to start a new discussion.

Things you can do

Support the National Psoriasis Foundation

Help the National Psoriasis Foundation reach its goals and support people like yourself by making a donation today.

Donate to the National Psoriasis Foundation

Discussion topics

Additional resources

Community leaders