Leech Therapy for Psoriasis

Has anyone tried the Leech therapy for psoriasis. Apparently leech therapy has been around for thousands of years and has been known to be very beneficial. There are several videos on youtube and a couple of places in new york, arizona and las vegas offer it.

Please let me know if anyone has tried it. I am planning to take time off from work and fly to NY for a few weeks(going to be expensive without pay).

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I pray you are making a joke, it can't be that you really believe blood letting will"cure" anything at all. I am going to make a voodoo doll and I am certain that will clear my psoriasis,believe me? Try it.

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I'm sure leeches have some medical benefits, I'm just not sure if and how it would help psoriasis, I did see on TV a few years ago a program about the development of a drug for people with cardio problems (mainly clogging).

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For sure you MUST be joking???

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the people who are taking money for this cure are the only leeches that are working on you.

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here is the article on the heart treatment. Makes sense..

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/newzealand /1339367/Leech-saliva-drug-could-cut-heart-attacks-by-a-third.html

As for psoriasis, I doubt it does any good.

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Have you researched this.From what I read taking blood isn't what helps but their saliva and if it were that simple Psoriasis wouldn't exist.Be interesting to see if anyone actually replies that they have used leeches and written it was very beneficial.I wouldn't waste my money on that trip but having a holiday sounds like a great idea as you will be less stressed and your psoriasis will improve.I have heard that fish can nibble of the dead skin and they are using that but it will still come back again.

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David & Ilaywood.. It's not about blood letting. From what I have researched the leeches saliva has some hirudo substances which helps treat psoriasis. I know for a fact where leeches have been used after reconstructive surgery to improve blood flow and reattached body parts.

I would like to hear 1st hand from psoriasis patients who have used leeches for treatment.

I have actually been denied leech treatment since i had taken biological medicines recently. They said they will not treat me unless it's been a year since i stopped biologicals.

Look up serveral leech treatment videos on youtube.

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Do you know the name of the center in NY that does the treatments? I'd like to research it, too.

Thanks

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ALA-MED - www.amazingleeches.com

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I am shaking my head.

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Please excuse my hard-headedness, but You Tube and Wikipedia are not science, they are either self promotion or people with too much free time.

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OMG! Please don't try this! I'm quite convinced my Palmoplantar psoriasis was triggered by a leech bite. There is no doubt that I had a big allergic reaction to the leech - swelling, inflammation etc - then a week or so after the bite, a rash developed, out of nowhere, on the soles of my feet, which was eventually diagnosed as PP. Please steer clear of this crazy idea - at the very least you may be allergic too.

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Yuck.

Rather you than me ;)

This is a very old therapy that dates back more than 3000 years.

Nowadays leech therapy is used in mainstream hospitals for many different health issues. Apparently the saliva of a leech contains a chemical that stops human blood from clotting, so it is very useful in certain medical procedures. I saw a documentary a number of years ago where the medical staff were very excited about their new leech breeding program. They said leech therapy was mainly abandoned for medication in the 1960’s but by 2000 it had came back into use.

I have only ever once heard of it in conjunction to psoriasis treatment. Mainly it is used for more serious surgery procedures like reattaching limbs and something to do with heart attacks.

And of course you would be using properly breed Medicinal leeches. Apparently over 400 species of leech have been identified worldwide but only around 10 are used for medicine purposes. So if you do go ahead with this, make sure the leeches are medical leeches and not leeches collected by Joe Bloggs from the local swamp. And make sure the person administrating them is trained and qualified to do so.

Given my reaction to getting a single leech on my leg during a bush walk; I am not sure if I could stomach the therapy in hospital. But that is just me.

I found a live leech in my kitchen sink last week. I have never had one in the house before. I have NO idea how it got in the house. Maybe my little pussycat brought it in with her, and it dropped off her into the sink. Anyway it has made me very paranoid, as she snuggles up next to me in bed and so each night I now find myself double checking the sheets for leeches. YUCKO.

Anyway good luck with whatever you choose.

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I am still shaking my head.

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Thanks, Little Pink Puss, as always the voice of experience and logic, which obviously is what is needed here. My head is shaking too.

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If leeches supposed to help people with psoriasis. Why do
we have dermatologist ? I think its crap there is no study on leeches that cures psoriasis and its not approved by
The FDA.

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.

I am simply suggesting that the OP stay safe if they decided to take this path.

(i.e.) Avoid backyard cowboys who got the leeches from the local hick swamp............and ONLY have the procedure done by trained medical staff at a hospital using properly breed leeches.

Despite people shaking their heads; leech therapy is a proper treatment used by medical staff in hospitals worldwide.

Although I can’t for the life of me understand how it would work for psoriasis ??!!

.

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I have read that the FDA has approved leeches to be marketed for medicinal purposes in the USA.

Nothing to do with psoriasis though; something to do with burns patients in hospital having skin grafting.

LPP

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Granted leeches is for medical use only with a qualified medical doctor w/a valid license but there is no cure yet that leeches can
Cure all types of psoriasis it will take a lot more years of research. For now only a dermatologist can give a prescription for psoriasis.

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I can speak from experience with the use of leeches-just not for psoriasis. My brother severed three fingers working on his home and because he was a smoker, he was at greater risk of losing his re-attachments. At 2 weeks, which is the determining factor whether amputated limbs/digits will stay, his fingers began to pale-meaning lower blood flow. He was being treated at the world-reknown Union Memorial Hand Center in Baltimore and they called in the leeches. Today he still has his fingers and can actually play the keyboards!

Now, about the use of leeches for psoriasis. Yesterday, I attended the seminar in Philly sponsored by the National Psoriasis Foundation. VERY informative. One thing the dermatologist was emphatic about - when you disturb psoriasis, it increases growth. One woman said that she cuts her scales off with a razor and she thinks it is slowing the growth. The doctor was kind but said that bumping, scratching, anything that disturbs the active areas will eventually make it worse. To me, leeches would fall into this category. Here's the reason why: Psoriasis is an auto immune response with active T-cells. No amount of leeches will change that. In fact, it will most likely have the opposite effect. You would be introducing another thing for the body's immune response to attack.

For moderate to severe disease, usually biologics are what are needed to control the disease. I learned this when I was diagnosed with a rare auto immune disease called Cutaneous Polyarteritis Nodosa. Thankfully, through treatment with a drug similar to methotrexate, I have been in remission from that disease for 9 years. Your body sometimes needs to have its immune system shut down and "rebooted" for it to act more normally.

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