Is Feta, the "greek" cheese, made from GOAT MILK considered to be DAIRY?

For those of us who choose to go "Dairy Free", hoping it will lessen the plaques, is goat milk OK?
Are the only products that are considered to be "Dairy" just from a cow?

Edited February 19, 2012 at 6:10 pm

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I love feta cheese! Is it really from a goat?

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Feta vs goat Cheese

"It’s very common for people not to make a distinction between feta and goat cheese. Feta cheese actually contains a larger content of sheep’s milk than goat’s milk, with about 70 percent to 30 percent respectively.
Goat cheese is made from wholly goat milk. "

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I went to Greece when I was a kid. I fell in love with Feta cheese then.

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I love it too................just a little makes salad much better

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The milk of any mammal that you would consume is considered to be dairy. Dairy is important in a balanced diet as it supplies calcium and other minerals and vitamins. Make sure that you get your calcium and vitamin D from other sources (preferably food) if you give up dairy.

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Yes, goat's milk & cheese is dairy. So I guess if someone were trying "dairy-free," they would eliminate it, too. Of course, what you choose to eliminate may depend on your view of what exactly it is IN that substance that you want to avoid. (lactose? fat? casein? the lectins?) For example, I recently read about the idea that cow-dairy products may contain lectins that have been transferred from the grains that the cows ingested. So, if you are trying to strictly avoid these, then you should consume only grass-fed cow's dairy products. (I don't know whether goats are fed grains to the extent that cows are in this country.) For many reasons, people sometimes 'overlook' yogurt as a dairy product to eliminate.

About the feta... I watched this America's Test Kitchen episode where they taste-tested feta. They said almost all the US domestic feta is from cow's milk, whereas imported feta is from the sheep's (& goat's) milk. They strongly preferred all the imported types; although some of them had that (even overpowering) "goatier" flavor.

I like them all, for different dishes though!

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It is dairy, but since it is not from a COW people with sensitivity to cow's milk can eat it.
Though my husband's ancestors have been traced back 600 years in Great Britain, a country not known for dairy intolerance ( quite the contrary) we found out that if he drinks cow's milk he gets a very upset stomach. I had noticed his discomfort for a decade but he insisted that he was fine and didn't need to see a doctor. One evening, however, after I served him soup and brie cheese and bread he was in such intestinal distress that he fell over and hit his head on the bathroom floor. I insisted he see a doctor the next day and the doctor diagnosed him as allergic to cow's milk products right away. Since he switched to soy milk for his coffee and goat's milk cheese and/or sheepsmilk cheese for lasagna he has done fine.

He says his allergy developed in his 20s.

In his childhood on the East Coast he had a severe case of asthma...triggered by mold. His father and paternal grandfather had asthma too. When we moved to the much more arid climate of Southern California he had no asthma, much to our relief.

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Hi Julia - Just to be correct, I would never say I was dairy-free if I were including milk products from any animal.

On to the practical: when I flare and need to clear, I don't eat any dairy at all. That's where I am now, after an excessive Valentine's Day woke the sleeping monster.

When I'm in my normal state, almost entirely clear, I can use small amounts of sheep or goat cheese (romano pecorino or goat feta) as condiments. Cow's milk cheese will cause redness the next day. Any blue cheese, whether cow or sheep's milk, will cause major redness and start the plaquing. (I love traditional European artisanal cheese...wah)

The thing is, these are likely personal allergies for me - no guarantee that you will react the same way. I'm not asthmatic and don't have particularly strong allergic reactions. It's all in my skin.

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Oh my... I love feta. I am new here and been trying to read posts on what to eat and what not to.
Not sure on how to go about it. But I am not sure I will be able to give up feta without so much sadness. :((

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Howzit Julia?

As you know, I am completely Dairy free. I use rice milk which I make from rice milk powder watered down to ones own preference.
About 1 month ago, I brought Goats milk yoghurt into my diet as well as goats milk cheese with no affects.
I eat goats yoghurt at b/fast time over my fruit and know that it is a wonderful digestive for my day.
I guess then, goats feta cheese would also be OK for me. ( Always the same cry heh? 'One mans meat is another man's poison')
I read something the other day in connection to inflammation triggers (my hobby horse) where they were saying that GOUDA type cheeses(cows)is less likely to affect us sensitive souls.
I am just testing something else out with some degree of success. I work on the principal of my 4 day rule. So, if I eat a 'treat' Rare red fillet steak! then I will not eat any red meat for 4 days. I work on the principle that your body gets rid of any "trouble" by this time.
I also use a goats Parmesan as sub for cows which again I find OK.
Hope you have positive results with Goats Feta...at least it is the real deal...as you would have in the Greek Islands( No cows there!)

Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.com

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Howzit Julia?

Original Feta is as you say, made with both sheep and goat milk...Baaaaat NOT cows. ;-)


Authentic Greek Feta Cheese
Plain
A PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) product.
Unlike other dairies that claim that their white cheeses are feta, Olympus feta cheese is the original Greek feta, made with the traditional recipe and with sheep and goat milk from producers in Greece.
Olympus feta has a distinctive tangy taste and creamy finish and makes a perfect addition to salads and other dishes. Or enjoy it on its own.

Ingredients: pasteurized sheep’s milk, pasteurized goat’s milk, rennet, starter culture, salt.
Moisture 56% max, fat in dry matter 48% min


Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.com

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