Haircuts and Psoriasis - Any Suggestions?

** Originally posted by deedledee **

My mother developed psoriasis about 4 months ago. She is being treated by a doctor, but none of the medications he has provided have worked so far. Her scalp is like one big scab and flakes, embarrassing her greatly.

Her dilemma is that she has not had her hair cut during this time...except cutting it herself. I tried to take her when this first started when she had a tiny red scab on her scalp but she wanted that to heal. Since then it has exploded all over her scalp. She has tried all the hair treatments with no result.

She is so embarrassed about her overgrown hair and needs to get it cut. How does she go about getting a haircut. She doesn't have a regular hairdresser...she just goes to an inexpensive place but usually after some time doesn't get a good cut and searches out another place.

Does she call a place and tell them about her condition. Does she just show up and tell them at the time. Or does she just go and keep her mouth shut. She's a little social phobic and afraid of going in the best of times. I wish I knew what to tell her.

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** Originally posted by Sam333 **

I tell them that I have some leisons on my scalp, it's just psoriasis, not
contageous. One woman told me she knows what it is, they're taught
about it in hairdresser school.

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** Originally posted by vrichmd **

You said that she has tried all the hair treatments. Has she tried Dermasmoothe? It is a prescription medicine that has been around for a long time. It has an oil base (mineral oil I believe). Before bedtime, you wet your hair, massage it into the scalp and cover your head with a shower cap. Before starting biologics, my scalp was always really bad. The Dermasmoothe was the only thing that worked for me. If my scalp was really bad, I would have to treat it for several days in a row and then every three to four days.

Van

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** Originally posted by creakysue **

I suggest just being open about it when making the appointment. Some hairdressers couldn't care less, others are squeemish. I don't ever like to make ppl do something they don't want to do. My hair guy said it didn't matter and I've been going to him for a while now. He's very good at what he does.

A nice tip afterwards shows appriciation.

Is your mom seeing a good derm for her P? Some products can dry out the scalp and make it much worse. I stay away from anything with salicylic acid in it as it makes me flake worse. You might want to try something in a base of oil. Also, Dovenex cream works really well for me without over drying.

Good luck & let us all know how it goes:)
Sue

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** Originally posted by alanc **

Please try Apple Cider Vinegar on it.

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** Originally posted by MikeK **

Hi Deedledee,

Welcome to the Board! :cool: Nice to meet you. I'm sorry to hear that your mother is going through such a rough time. You've already been give some great advice. Here's a link to some previous discussions about hair dressers and psoriasis: http://www.psoriasis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=12046&highlight=hair+dresse r and http://www.psoriasis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=5208&highlight=hair+dresser .

One of the most frustrating thing about having psoriasis is that something that works for one person may or may not work for another. To add insult to injury something that works today may suddenly stop working, but will work again some time in the near or distant future. To further add insult to injury, something that didn't work the first time that you tried will work some time in the future. It can be so frustrating! You mentioned that none of the medications that your mother's doctor has prescribed has worked so far, so I'm going to offer a few suggestions. Hopefully, I'll be able to come up with something that she hasn't tried yet. I find it helpful to rotate between several different prescription and over the counter treatments.

Here's some prescription suggestions:

  • Van (vrichmd) recommended Derma-Smooth/FS. That's an excellent suggestion! It's kind of messy to use, because you have to leave it on -- covered by a shower cap -- for a couple of hours. (Most people leave it on overnight.) It stains and the stains are impossible to get out, so old clothes, towels and bed linens are a must. (I usually cover my pillowcase with an old towel.) It can be very hard to get used to. (Some people have posted here that they stopped using it, because they didn't think that they could ever get used to it.) Despite these drawbacks it can be a very effective weapon in the war against scalp psoriasis. (It's peanut oil based so your mother can't use it if she has an allergy to peanuts.) Like Van, I highly recommend it. Here's a link to some additional information: http://www.hillderm.com/questions/questions.htm.
  • Olux foam (http://www.olux.com) or it's milder cousin Luxiq foam (http://www.luxiq.com)are two products that I highly recommend. They burn for several very long minutes when you first put them on. To me that's a sign that they are working. Olux has a very powerful steroid in it and so should only be used for short periods of time (say about two weeks max) followed by a break of at least several weeks. Some people start off with the Luxiq and work their way up to Olux and vice versa.
  • Capex Shampoo (http://www.capexshampoo.com)

Here's some over the counter suggestions:

  • Baker's P&S oil is similar to the Derma-Smooth/FS in that you leave it on for a couple of hours covered by a shower cap. It's mineral oil based and it doesn't have any medication in it. It's another very messy product but it can be very helpful in loosening the scales. Although it is available over the counter, it's not a stock item. It usually has to be special ordered by the drug store. I've never been able to find a website for Baker's products (they also make a shampoo) so I'm going to give you a link to a site that sells it online. I've
  • never ordered anything from them so I have no idea how reliable they are. I'm giving you the link because their description is a good one. Here it is: http://www.dermadoctor.com/product.asp?WID=%7B29749BC7%2D0B35%2D4715%2D88BC %2D8D2746DB41D0%7D&productid=206
  • Paul Mitchell tea tree shampoo (they also make a conditioner) (http://www.paulmitchell.com/site/subpage.asp?section=2,10,32) is very soothing. I was told that you can only buy Paul Mitchell products at beauty supply stores, but I was able to find the shampoo at a New York area chain type drug store. It's very expensive, but I was able to find a cheaper tea tree shampoo by reading just about every bottle of shampoo in the store. (I'm out of it and its name escapes me at the moment.) I include both the Paul Mitchell product and the cheaper product my shampoo rotation. Julia (AmeliasMom), who is one of the mothers who posts on the Parents and Caregivers Board recommended Nature's Gate tea tree shampoo. (Here's a link one of the posts where she discusses it: http://www.psoriasis.org/forum/showthread.php?p=81776#post81776.) I haven't used it yet, but I did pick up a bottle a couple of weeks ago. It's cheaper then the Paul Mitchell product. As I mentioned in my response to Julia, I was able to find a store in my area that carried Nature's Gate products by going to their website and using the "find a retailer" feature. It's searchable by zip code. Here's a link: http://www.worldpantry.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ExecMacro/naturesgate/findast ore.d2w/report
  • Neutrogena makes shampoos that come in different strengths and formulas. One formula (Neutrogena/T-Gel) has coal tar in it and one formula (Neutrogena/T-Sal) has salicylic acid in it. Coal tar has been used to treat psoriasis for many, many years (coal tar products may not be available if your mother lives in California) and salicylic acid is one of the few doctor approved methods for removing scales. Here's a link for some additional information:http://www.neutrogena.com/ProductsLine_7_2.asp.
  • MG217 (http://www.mg217.com) makes a shampoo that comes in two formulas -- one with coal tar and one with salicylic acid. (Here in New Jersey, the salicylic acid version of MG217 products (they also make a lotion and an ointment) seems to be available by special order only.)
  • Dermarest (http://www.dermarest.com) makes a shampoo (and a lotion) that has salicylic acid in it.


    (NOTE: Products with salicylic acid in them should be avoided if your mother is using a prescription medication called Dovonex to treat her psoriasis. That's because salicylic acid actually deactivates the Dovonex. Here's a link to the NPF's discussion of Dovonex. The info re: salicylic acid is towards the end of the discussion: http://www.psoriasis.org/treatment/psoriasis/calcipotriene.php.)

I'm sorry that this turned into such a novel. You're probaby suffering from information overload. :rolleyes: I hope that it helps in some small way. Good luck. Keep us posted and please don't be a stranger.

Mike

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** Originally posted by Sam333 **

One other thing about these shampoos, she should leave them on for at
least 15 minutes before rinsing them out. No longer then that for the steroid
based, but I leave the OTC shampoos on for 20 - 30 minutes.

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** Originally posted by vmars **

I have had p on my scalp for 28 years.....lately only around the hairline but initially all over. One thing I find is that the longer my hair is the worse my p will get. I would suggest telling the hairdresser in advance and don't be afraid to get your hair cut. Shorter hair might actually help. At the very least it makes it easier to get the meds on. (I always find that I am more diligent with the ointments when my hair is short, it is easier to forget about it when the hair grows)

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** Originally posted by ttburton **

Hi there, when Johnathon went for a haircut after his scalp P became bad, I told them before the cut. If I call ahead to make an appointment I tell them he has P and that other than having to be gentle close to the scalp there is nothing special they need to do. As was mentioned, during their training, hair dressers learn of different scalp conditions from lice to P and everything in between. They learn how to talk about it to their clients and how to work with them. Most are very receptive when told in advance. I think not mentioning would be uncomfortable to everyone.

Perhaps you can make the appointment for her and talk with the hairdresser. this way you will get a feel for her reaction and can determine if she would be a good person for your mother. Also, once she has found a hairdresser who she is comfortable with, it would help her to continue seeing the same one.

Good luck and keep us posted on how your mom makes out.


Tammy (Johnathon's mom)

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** Originally posted by gasteiner **

I've found that most hair cutters have had experiance with psoriasis and it's no big deal to them.

As for treatment, I found something on this line that has worked great. It's Nioxin Cleanser shampoo and Nioxon Scalp Theropy conditioner. The trick is to wash your hair with the shampoo, partially towel-dry your hair, then rub in liberal amounts of the conditioner. Let the condition stay in for about 10 minutes. After a couple of weeks I found significant clearing. Now I use it every day and follow-up a few problem spots with the prescription liquid drops. For the most part, there are no flakes as long as I keep the routine up. Hope it works for others.

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** Originally posted by cookie_99 **

Sorry your mom is having this problem.. I had it with loosing of hair oozing redness and all. The old fashion tar shampoo is what my dr. told me to use after using all these fancy shampoos. Now maybe Im just lucky that it cleared up... much luck......

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** Originally posted by Maracel **

I have scalp psoriasis really badly: constant flaking, constant itching, red and scabby. I do the best I can with lots of different products and shampoos, but nothing seems to help much. When my scalp is tight I make my own mixture of colloidal oatmeal and mineral oil, rub it in my scalp (feels wonderful), and cover with a shower cap, and leave it overnight. It leaves my hair quite nice after I shampoo it out.

I go to the hairdresser regularly. I've always told them ahead of time, and no one has ever seemed to worry about it. As others have said, they know about it - it's not uncommon, and they know it's not contagious.

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** Originally posted by JKNY **

I have had p for 31 years and keep my hair short. I have never said a word about it to any of my barbers and none has ever said a word about it to me. P or dandruff is a very common site to hair professionals and if they say anything then they are obviously being UNprofessional.

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** Originally posted by deedledee **

Thank you all so much. This information is very helpful and at least we can see that a haircut and psoriasis can go together. We'll look into some of the suggestions to help it clear up better.

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** Originally posted by sdavies **

I'm not sure how it works in the states but over here you can get some hairdressers who come to the house - my mam has terrible scalp p and there have been times when she has felt awful about having her hair done so having someone she has grown to trust who comes to the house makes her feel comfortable and there is none of the fear of having someone looking at you in a saloon. Hope you get it sorted, its suprising how having your hair done can make you feel better about yourself.
x
Stacey(The welsh lass across the pond)

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** Originally posted by Kat1 **

Hi, I read the thread yesterday and just happened to be going for a cut. I asked my hairdresser what she thought would be the best way to get a new stylist. She said calling ahead and speaking to someone would assure your mom that she was in willing hands. My stylist was an instructor for many years in MI and they are taught about p. For myself, I would find someone I liked and establish a relationship with them. Everyone feels secure and if changes take place it won't offend the stylist. Be Blessed. Kathy

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** Originally posted by TRUCR **

I am a hairdresser with a husband with severe p especially the scalp... I would recommend bakers P&S solution for 2 nights before hair appt... This stuff is amazing for removing scales from scalp..Of course they will come back but it is a temp fix...put it on at bed time..pew it does stink but oh well.. we had a hard time finding it...Rite aid ordered it for us... also hospitals have lists of hairdressers for sick peeps... these hairdressers might be more familiar with p and may not be as shocked... we arent taught much about it in cosmetology school..I always thought it was a contagious skin condition and I have done hair 24 years...Hope this helps
p.s. Hes on week 2 of enbrel..wish us luck

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** Originally posted by cookie_99 **

Hi to all, Ive read all the posting on the scalp p. which i have includeing over my body, but does any ones hair fall out? Im so depressed about this was wondering if Im the only one.. thanks a lot

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** Originally posted by wiredqs **

No, Cookie you are not the only one. I ended up with most of my body covered due to a drug reaction which also caused hair loss. Then I was on Soriatane. My hair was down to the middle of my back. After 6 months it is now mostly back, but about 3/4 of an inch. There is hope....
Another sue

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** Originally posted by makeitgoaway **

My mother developed psoriasis about 4 months ago. She is being treated by a doctor, but none of the medications he has provided have worked so far. Her scalp is like one big scab and flakes, embarrassing her greatly.

Her dilemma is that she has not had her hair cut during this time...except cutting it herself. I tried to take her when this first started when she had a tiny red scab on her scalp but she wanted that to heal. Since then it has exploded all over her scalp. She has tried all the hair treatments with no result.

She is so embarrassed about her overgrown hair and needs to get it cut. How does she go about getting a haircut. She doesn't have a regular hairdresser...she just goes to an inexpensive place but usually after some time doesn't get a good cut and searches out another place.

Does she call a place and tell them about her condition. Does she just show up and tell them at the time. Or does she just go and keep her mouth shut. She's a little social phobic and afraid of going in the best of times. I wish I knew what to tell her.

Perhaps if you tell us what city your mom lives in, someone can recommend a hair stylist that one of us uses. Your mom might feel more comfortable using someone who cuts hair of others with P.

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** Originally posted by heidiann **

Sorry about your mom's problem. I could totally understand since I had the same problem and didn't go to a hairdresser for about 10 years. Then I finally said screw it and went. To my surprise it was no big deal. I have changed hairdressers a few times and they all told me they studied p in school. If you live in central Jersey, I have a great hairdresser for her.

Good luck.

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