Glycerin

** Originally posted by wildflowerAnn **

BrianH has had good experience with glycerin. Actually, my Dad suggested that I use Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Hand Cream for cracked finger tips. My skin was cracking and the cracks were running under my fingernails.
Ouch! So I bought some at Walgreens for $5. It is glycerin rich and it does work very well at healing cracked skin.

Brian, I didn't get the bargain price, but I'm paying more for the convenient, purse size tube that I can carry everywhere. People on immunosuppressants have to wash their hands all the time, and need moisturizer that is portable.

I don't think I want to drink any, but it does help my fingers. :)

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

Glycerin is the secret active ingredient in many/most skin lotions and preparations, including some (very nice) pricey soaps. But the pure stuff is cheap, and works much faster, without those intolerable floral scents. ;)

I've come to the point that if anything goes wrong, I wonder first, "Could glycerin be used for that?"

Here's an amazing example. My father had suffered, from mid-life on, with ingrown toenails. He had the usual surgical treatment, which is to cut away the sides of the nails on the big toes and kill the "bed" that grows them. Periodically he had to have an agonizing re-do.

Recently, I began feeling my right big toenail trying to cut off a chunk of flesh. VERY painful; touching bedsheets or socks was almost more contact than it could stand. So, I began applying the glycerin 2-3 times a day on the theory that since it "normalized" tissue growth, it might discourage the sides of the toe from trying to overlap the nail.

The pain reduced somewhat right away. And kept declining. After a week the only time it hurt was on impact. After two weeks, I'd have no trouble drop-kicking a football. Barefoot.

It also handles halitosis (instantly); bug bites (after an attack, months-long, by bedbugs, believe me on this); sore throat; nasal congestion (50/50 water mixture, dabbed inside the nostrils -- floods the nose, shrinks swollen passages, drains. about ½hr.); scratches and cuts (doubles healing speed, cuts scarring in half); constipation (mild laxative; about half a tsp should do, straight or mixed in juice, etc. ; tastes sweet, btw.); burns (sun or fire or scalds, works very fast); thickens skin for prednizone users (according to one user testimony, but this is consistent with its method of operation, which is to normalize cell function); world's best moisturizer when mixed with water (actively opens cell wall pores, transports itself and any mixture along). Used in candy bars and toothpaste. Substitutes for machine oil in food processing equipment to avoid contamination.

3 carbon alcohol, non-volatile (won't evaporate), burns slowly with hot blue flame.

Psoriasis is just the start of its applications. It is currently being researched as a cancer treatment, for its ability to normalize cell function and stop runaway growth. It is now injected into the CS fluid for stroke victims, and into heart muscle damaged by ischemia.

(It will never be promoted by drug companies; it's not patentable, and is dirt cheap. Doctors, most of whom learn all they know about drugs and their uses from drug salesmen, are likely ignorant of it.)

Look up research by Georgia U. Med School, for the basics.

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** Originally posted by wildflowerAnn **

Aw Brian, you left yourself wide open for that. Some of us are quite severe P and PA patients, and we adore our physicians. (They keep us functioning.) We don't think for a moment that they are ignorant.

But your point about glycerin being a great moisturizer is really good. CeraVe and Eucerin didn't do anything for the cracked skin, but the glycerin cleared mine quickly.

Ann

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

Some of us are quite severe P and PA patients, and we adore our physicians.

Ann

Here's a challenge. Select one area that has a symmetric patch on the other side of the body. Flip a coin to choose one. Treat it 1-3X a day with glycerin. Observe the difference after 3-7 days. (But note that there will be some overall effect. Glycerin penetrates the skin and has considerable systemic action and benefit in addition to the local topical results.)

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** Originally posted by JustDucky **

I agree with Brian on this one. The doctors get educated on the newer drugs by the drug salesmen. I worked in a pharmacy as a pharmacists assistant. You want someone who can tell you about drugs, consult a pharmacist. You have no idea how many doctors do that.

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** Originally posted by wildflowerAnn **

Wait,,,,wait,,, LOL! I've been misunderstood. I'm not in love with my dermatologist. :)

I can't experiment with anecdotal posts about what works, because I have generalized pustular psoriasis overlying exfoliating erythroderma. Pretty severe stuff that requires buckets of pharmaceuticals. My dermatologist would just have a fit if I messed things up by trying all of the things suggested on these message boards.

However some people have very mild psoriasis and can do that, and sometimes they have great success. I'm always happy to read about the successful over-the-counter treatments.

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** Originally posted by welshgirl **

Where do I buy glycerine and in what form?

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

Where do I buy glycerine and in what form?

Any drug chain should have it. It's an oily-looking liquid. Get the 'USP' bottle: it's pure. Comes in various sizes up to 8 oz. Lasts a long time; it spreads very thinly.

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** Originally posted by welshgirl **

Thank you, Brian.

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** Originally posted by JustDucky **

Well, ya know I am gonna look for this stuff..lol

Mine is really mild. Sometimes I feel that I have no business being here...cept, I have it where "the sun dont shine" and I notice, if people have it there...they arent as mouthy about it as I am..lol

I dont care who knows...because when I first found out this is what it was "there" I couldnt find but a little bit of info on it.

I have had more people private message me to ask me what it looks and feels like. I am glad i can help them.

Anyway...I am gonna look for this. I can try it on my little skeeto bite p's.

So..it should say glycerin USP. I am in walmart all of the time. Any idea where it would be kept? I know, in the drug area ..but would it be near alcohol, or skin products (itching). Any idea?

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** Originally posted by JustDucky **

I would say that thats "some" not "all". We got a lot of calls from physicians. We also made some, because of "their" mistakes on rxs.

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** Originally posted by Mikel **

I thought Glycerine is a carcinogen (causes cancer). Checked out at http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com

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** Originally posted by wildflowerAnn **

Hi Mike,

I use the Neutrogena formula, developed by the North Sea fisherman. Or so the story goes on the package. Once I used a sea-sick medication used by North Sea fisherman during a wild storm in Resurrection Bay. It worked. I think those fisherman endure quite a bit, and they have found some pretty good remedies. I trust the Neutrogena skin and body care products.
All I can say is those skin cracks healed quickly and the pain is gone. :)

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

I thought Glycerine is a carcinogen (causes cancer). Checked out at http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com

Sorry. It's not in the list of ingredients with a cancer risk. A "Glyceryl" compound is, but is totally different. If you have a specific page link, give it.

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

Yes, Ouchy, of course many do make an effort and there are requirements. But it's an uphill battle, and few can spare enough time for it.

IAC, it was just a warning that few physicians are up on everything; note the number of patients who have brought side-effects reports etc. to their doctors' attention. This is not rare or an accident.

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** Originally posted by BrianH **

Just Ducky
....
So..it should say glycerin USP. I am in walmart all of the time. Any idea where it would be kept? I know, in the drug area ..but would it be near alcohol, or skin products (itching). Any idea?

Shelving policies differ chain to chain and store to store. Try skin lotions or first aid. Or just ask. ;)

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** Originally posted by oscarinfw **

Wait,,,,wait,,, LOL! I've been misunderstood. I'm not in love with my dermatologist. :)

...

I have the prettiest doctor I've ever been a patient of as my dermatologist. Good thing she's got a rock on her finger otherwise I'd be thinking about the inappropriateness of making a pass. :)

I'm bit upset with her though. She and the Rheumatologist should have been sharing notes; especially with regards to the use of expensive and exotic biologics (enbrel) for treatment. I find out more than a month after the blood tests that enbrel may not be an appropriate treatment for my situation.

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** Originally posted by Uniqua **

Would glycerin be appropriate for guttate P? All over the body? Used in conjunction with Lidex ointment?

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** Originally posted by 983az8mk **

MAKES GREAT BIG BUBBLES WITH A LITTLE SOAP ADDED I WONDER IF IT WILL DECLOG MY KITCHEN DRAIN? SORRY FOR THAT FEELING A LITTLE PUNCHY RIGHT NOW.ACTUALLY IN THE PAST I HAVE USED GLYCERINE AND DOES HELP ,IT SURELY CAN DESCALE THE PATCHES OF P.

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** Originally posted by einna **

Here's a challenge. Select one area that has a symmetric patch on the other side of the body. Flip a coin to choose one. Treat it 1-3X a day with glycerin. Observe the difference after 3-7 days. (But note that there will be some overall effect. Glycerin penetrates the skin and has considerable systemic action and benefit in addition to the local topical results.)

The usefulness of this trial would be totally useless on me. My symetrical patches heal at different intervals with the same treatment. My patches heal one day with one treatment and then that treatment can fail me another day. Unfortunately it is the nature of the disease. When someone has success with a treatment they often assume that it will work for everyone. :( Oh, if that were only the case.

If drug reps didn't go around presenting drugs and their clinical trials how would our docs know what to try? (Docs can't spend all day treating patients, satisfying the demands of government regulations, battling with the insurance companies, run a business AND investigate & study every drug). Drug reps are useful. You can bad mouth them from here to kingdom come, but they serve a purpose. And in more times than not it benefits the patient. Docs don't learn from drug reps, they learn from the information that the reps bring them. It's the same information available to anyone.

I'm glad we have drug reps. In our office, the samples left by the reps give us the opportunity to try our patients on different meds without the cost of a prescription so that we can determine what med works best for them. They are so appreciate that we are trying to help them and save money for them at the same time. When we find the med that works best for them, that is when we write a script.

The reps don't influence our choice, the patient's results are what determines what meds they end up on. If you wish to believe that this is not the norm, you are sorely mistaken. There are the bad teachers, the bad teenagers, the bad doctors. They will receive the attention and all the press. The good docs go on without recognition, just as the good teachers etc. may never be heard about.

I am glad that glycerin is helping anyone! It just doesn't mean it will help everyone! And don't be such a fool that you think docs don't leave medical school knowing about glycerin. There are certain types of wounds that are routinely treated with glycerin. It is available in every hospital pharmacy and used in the operating room. Karen is correct in supporting the fact that one shouldn't use blanket statements.

Annie

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** Originally posted by JustDucky **

The docs are give us rx's because we need them...but, I dont think there is a person here, that hasnt tried things on their own. Diets, the sun, lotions, oils, creams, shampoos, etc.

Everyday, we have posts on....this worked for me...try it.

This is just one of those. Its cheap enough to try. It seems harmless and it works for this guy. Hey, for what I have spent over the last few years on over the counter stuff...I would give this a shot. Why not? I just gave away a bunch of lotions and creams..there is room under my sink now...this will fit..lol

Nobody is against doctors...but trying this wont hurt.

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