Gingivitis/Periodontal disease and psoriasis

There is some research being done on a link between gum disease and psoriasis.
It might be interesting to those of us with even the mildest form of a periodontal condition to study the findings thus far.
The link:
http://dentistry.tbzmed.ac.ir/jpid/index.php/jpid/article/viewFile/2011e6/3 3

Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.com

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Zee
I have read that low Vit D levels R also associated w/ gum disease and
most of us Ps patients have low Vit D levels.

I have minor inflammation on lower gum. I have been taking Vit D3, 10,000 IU per day
for about a month because my D level was so low.
Will see of there is any difference when I get the D3 up to normal.

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Howzit Julia,

I would be very interested to hear your results.
When I suffered with gum desease, I cleared it up with H2o2 Hydrogen Peroxide.
Every time I cleaned my teeth, I swilled my mouth with 10vol 3% H2o2, as you would with a mouthwash and whilst it is still in your mouth, brush with your normal toothpaste. Even my dentist congratulated me on a very healthy mouth. Also great for neutralising any stale breath due to the disease. Tip: Pour some of the solution into a glass and let your toothbrush soak whilst you are not using it. I once read about the trillions of 'nasties' that our t/brushes collect/develop,
PS: Must check out D3 10:000 iu per day. Not sure whether I'm taking that strength. Will up the dose if not.
Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.comas they sit in the bathroom!!

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In my case, this was true. I lost a significant amount of connective tissue in my gums in only a few years, which resulted in the removal of all my teeth and a good bit of my jaw.

I'd seen a specialist at the first sign of trouble (bleeding gums after brushing), but that was prior to having a diagnosis of PsA. The peri at that time was ascribed to 'smoking' so I quit, but that didn't stop the progression or the eventual loss. I'd suspected that smoking wasn't the culprit, as I'd smoked for over 20 years without any tooth issues ~ why the sudden problems? I'm not saying smoking is good or bad, just that it didn't really have anything to do with my teeth. I can be pretty sure it wasn't vitamin D either, but a result of P/PsA. My rheumy says he's seen it too often.

By the time I got my PsA diagnosis I'd already lost about a quarter of my teeth. There was no way to save what was left so they were eliminated. Far fewer problems now, and my new teeth are so bright you can see me smile a mile away.

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Thank you for the link Zee. I need to go to the dentist.

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Yes Zee
H2O2 is the best bactericidal solution, but I am going to wait for my Vit D level to be normal and see if it makes a difference.
If I use the H2O2 now, then I won't know if the improvement is due to Vit D3 or H2O2.

As far as Vit D Dose, don't go by me! Maybe I am taking too much, so do research if U consider increasing UR dose.
Mine was very low and I have read that it takes months and a high dose to get it up to normal, but my MD (PCP) said
2OOO IU per day.

I got that 10,000 IU from a few members of this site, but many people take less.

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OK Julia...Just checked my Vit D3 and it is 4000 iu which, as I am always in the sunshine of the Western Cape, is maybe sufficient.
Think you are wise to do the self analysis re D3 and H2o2.
Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.com

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It's not vitamin D. It's the connective tissue that's degraded;
• Cementum: A layer of connective tissue that binds the roots of the teeth firmly to the gums and jawbone.
• Periodontal ligament: Tissue that helps hold the teeth tightly against the jaw.

If I'd started a biologic when I first noticed the signs it may have been possible to save them.

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Scary stuff. I'll stay on my biologic... AND go to the dentist.

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Zee I'm glad you posted the link. It's a pretty technical paper but very informative and I think I got the gist of it. Wish there was a laymen's version. Just this week I finished having a deep cleaning of my teeth, and have to have some minor gum surgery on one section that has involved the bone. I'm now using a fluoride toothpaste and a special antibacterial rinse to try to keep the bacteria levels down so the pockets can heal. Have read about using hydrogen peroxide mouth rinsing before so was going to start that also.

I have to say that because of some other medical conditions my dental care the last year wasn't great and I hadn't been to the dentist in about 14 months. Although my teeth care has never been stellar, I've never had anything even close to this level of problems, so I thought the decline was a bit more then I had earned. They did say that stress can have a significant effect and I've certainly had an excess of that, too. Now having read the paper perhaps having psoriasis is also part of the cause. I'll share it with my dentist, but I imagine he'll pretty much brush it off just because he's not too familiar with psoriasis.

Vitamin D has been mentioned above also, and I'm currently taking 5000 iu daily. It's time to get it rechecked and will be interesting to see if it's come up from 13. It effects so much, and they're still discovering new information, that I wouldn't be surprised if it is also involved in having healthy gums, too. I'll report in when I find out my new level.

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More Evidence Vitamin D helps prevent gum disease

ScienceDaily (June 17, 2011) — Laboratory-grown gingival cells treated with vitamin D boosted their production of an endogenous antibiotic, and killed more bacteria than untreated cells, according to a paper in the June 2011 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity.

Research suggests that vitamin D can help protect the gums from bacterial infections that lead to gingivitis and periodontitis. Periodontitis affects up to 50 percent of the US population, is a major cause of tooth loss, and can also contribute to heart disease. Most Americans are deficient in vitamin D.

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Thanks Julia. A bit off the topic of psoriasis but great info. Wonder if using vit. D capsules and putting the goo inside them on my gums would help?

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It seems that gum disease may be a co morbidity of psoriasis. Therefore someone with psoriasis and gum disease should strongly consider a biologic. Maybe vitamins help maybe not. I don't want to lose my teeth finding out.

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If gum disease is a problem I feel that a dentist and if needed a periodontist are the best choice since once it's gets too bad the damage caused can require extensive, expensive, and painful repair. I certainly wouldn't want to wait and see if a biologic worked while my teeth, gums, and jaw bone continued to get worse, which I've found doesn't take all that long.

While I had some bleeding as an indication of problems, it was minor, and I had absolutely no pain to indicate I had developed significant problems. I'm now paying the price - having to undergo uncomfortable deep cleaning, periodontal surgery next week, and replacement of five crowns partly due to gum recession. All to the tune of about $10,000!

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I said dentist also. that's the first thing I said. Also without a dentist how very would you know you even had gum disease.

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In doing a little more research I found this that indicates the gum disease may one at increased risk of psoriasis. This is written in laymen's terms so it's easier to understand than the article which Zee posted the link. It will be interesting to see what more they come up with as their studies continue.

"Study supports link between periodontal disease and psoriasis. Data collected from more than 60,000 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study supports the theory that periodontal disease is a strong risk factor for psoriasis. "It is biologically plausible that chronic low-grade periodontal inflammation may stimulate the psoriasis pathway directly or via induction of a systemic inflammatory response," lead investigator Sarah Nakib reported at the 2011 meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. Women reporting periodontal bone loss were at significant increased risk of psoriasis. Study results consistent with other published literature Investigators say further research is necessary." - from SmartBrief.com

http://www.modernmedicine.com/modernmedicine/Modern+Medicine+Now/Study-data -points-to-periodontal-disease-as-psoria/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/737 304?contextCategoryId=40160

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@Julia: No, of course not. But if someone has moderate Ps and is wavering between taking a biologic or not, maybe it's a factor to consider.

Or maybe the infection is a possible cause of psoriasis as the second link is suggesting. There's probably many ways for psoriasis to start ranging from infection to injury to just aging. Probably anything that activates your immune system for a significant period can throw it into a bit of chaos. Maybe that's another good reason to keep blood cytokene levels down to normal, because psoriasis can lead to more serious conditions.

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Julia I've never heard of putting vit D on gums either. It was just a thought based on what you posted:

"ScienceDaily (June 17, 2011) — Laboratory-grown gingival cells treated with vitamin D boosted their production of an endogenous antibiotic, and killed more bacteria than untreated cells, according to a paper in the June 2011 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity."

Andrew sorry if I came on a bit strong. I'm in dental / gum work shock this past month. And now to read that gum disease and psoriasis may be related was surprising to say the least.

Zee - I don't have any medical background so the article you listed was tough to understand, and then I found the other study. They seem to contradict each other, or are they just which came first, the chicken or the egg. Can you clarify their thesis?

The article you found states: "In conclusion, there is a higher prevalence of periodontitis in psoriasis subjects as compared to age- and gender-matched periodontitis controls, . . ."

And then the study I found states: Analyses of prospectively collected data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) suggest periodontal disease (PD) may be a risk factor for psoriasis,. . ." and "It is biologically plausible that chronic low-grade periodontal inflammation may stimulate the psoriasis pathway directly or via induction of a systemic inflammatory response,. . ."

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Annie
I just re-read the Science Daily article. Maybe it does imply that the Vit D was applied directly?!

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Annie
well the truth is probably no one knows for sure which came first!!
Your Vit D level is probably OK if you have been taking it for 6 months.
But who knows how many years it was low!?
What Dr ordered the test for you and why??
My Dr did not even want to do it! He did not know Ps was an automimmune disease!

I have a 45 yo male friend who has very bad gum disease but has done nothing about it in years
because of the $$$. He never had Ps but he smokes
...............................
Andrew
I agree.
C-reactive protein (CRP) blood test can be ordered to determine if there is chronic inflammation.

CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body, such as infection or autoimmune diseases.
I think I already take all precautions aginst inflammation, such as taking 81 grains of aspirin daily and
avoiding most man made foods listing "ingredients" (additives).

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Howzit?

Found this 'happy' piece of info.......As if we don't have enough to worry about!!

'Gum disease/periodontal disease or disease of the connective tissue and bones supporting the teeth nearly doubles an individual's risk of suffering a fatal heart attack or stroke. Gum disease increases the inflammatory process in the human body. Inflammation is a dangerous situation with the potential to damage blood vessels to and of the heart. This vascular damage can lead to blockage; the obvious result of which is heart attack. People with severe periodontal disease often display other major cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Gum disease is preventable,treatable, and has far reaching consequences. People suffering from it should seek evaluation and treatment immediately.

Psoriasis is another example of inflammation in one part of the body affecting other parts. Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the skin. Studies have indicated psoriasis is almost as big a risk factor for cardiovascular disease as smoking. The inflammation that causes/accompanies psoriasis can have a significant effect on the cardiovascular system as discussed in the paragraph above."

Go well,

Zee22 www.psoriasisbesymptomfree.blogspot.com

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