Does sleeping under an electric blanket help you?

** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

Last night for the first time this year I slept under an electric blanket. My sleep habits are a bit strange. About 15 years ago my wife and I bought twin beds from Penney's. They are adjustable beds, like hospital beds. I sleep on my back, never on my side or stomach.

We had them both in our bedroom, but we got older and her sleeping became harder. She has a lot of pain that causes her not to sleep well. So sometimes she slept in another bedroom. Over about a 10 year period she slept in the other bedroom more and more. When we moved to town last may we just set up two bedrooms. I kept one of the twin beds. About that time I had visited a "Relax the Back" store. I was looking for a massage chair, but I set in a "O" gravity chair. I really liked the feel of it. I went home and adjusted my bed as close to that position as I could.

We have a small motor home with twin beds. I have mine adjusted as close to the "O" gravity chair as I could. Also we have sleeping bags on the beds. I really like the sleeping bag to sleep in. I do not like to fight covers when I get up at night and do not like the weight of the covers. So in my bed at home I sleep on top of the covers with a light blanket over me. We keep the house temperature at night about 65 degrees. Sometimes I do not sleep as worm as I would like and 1/2 the time I sleep in my longjohns.

As I said above last night I slept under one of those light electric blankets that you use for a cover while watching TV. I started the night in my longjohns but had to take off the bottoms, I also wear under shorts, but left the longjohn top on because the electric blanket is not long enough to tuck under my feet and reach much past my belly. I folded the blanket over about my waist. Where it is double is where I kept my hands and it is warmer there. This morning my hands were not as stiff.

I got too wordy again, but it seemed to really help. Just wondered if some of you use an electric blanket.

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** Originally posted by airway **

I have found a heated matress pad works better than an electric blanket for me.

I also cannot sleep without my wonderful body pillow http://www.mycomfortu.com/

The massage chair I have is an iJoy brand (http://www.ijoy.com). The specific model I have is the Human Touch iJoy 300. I've been very happy with it. I've never tried a zero gravity chair.

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** Originally posted by judyweaves **

I've thought about an electric blanket, but I live in an apt. building where the heat is more than adequate -- and with my hot flashes I'm plenty warm!! I also usually have 3 cats sleeping with me, so we've got plenty of body heat going!!

I do enjoy flannel sheets in the winter, especially this very cold winter. In general, warmth makes me feel better. Yesterday was a painful one, and I found that a hot bath helped. Also I make my own ginger tea, which is good for inflammation I believe (and many other problems). I dice about a tablespoon of fresh ginger and put it in a cup with boiled water. Let it steep for 10 or 15 minutes and add some honey and maybe a dash of cinnamon.

Ginger is very warming as well.

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** Originally posted by ginnylee **

Ginger is very warming as well.

I had a giggle about that line because my name is Ginger.

Seriously, I hadn't thought about sleeping under an electric blanket. I may have to try that.

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** Originally posted by rosc2112 **

Tell ya what, an electric matress warmer beats an electric blanket for me :)
It's sooooo nice getting into a very warm bed, I keep it on high before getting in bed, then turn it all the way down to 2 (it would be too hot for me otherwise.) The cats love it too :)

The heat from the matress warmer is more consistent than an electric blanket, in my experience. Blankets tend to get cold spots, and then wake you up sweating in the middle of the night cos they got too hot. The matress warmer stays a nice constant temperature, no cold spots, no sudden overheating in the middle of the night.

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

I had to work on the computer all day and my right hand is swollen and stiff form holding the mouse tonight. Bothered me more that working outside. We layed a cement wall this last week, 12' long and about 7' tall, among other things.

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

My fingers on my "mouse" hand are not swollen this morning but are a little stiff.

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

I don't guess they have tested My thyroid, why.

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** Originally posted by MikeK **

I don't guess they have tested My thyroid, why.

Hi Rolacoy,

Psoriasis and PA are both autoimmune diseases and it's common for people to have more then one autoimmune disease. For the last couple of years, both my rheumy and my internist have told me that my bloodwork showed signs of "borderline" hypothyroidism. Because they both used the word "borderline" and because neither one of them seemed concened, I never pursued the issue. (I didn't even bother to google.) In October 2007, I went for routine appointment with my rheumy and he once again said "borderline hypothyroidism" when we went over my bloods. Fast forward to February 2008. When my internist and I went over the bloods, from my annual physical, he said that my thyroid numbers had doubled (he had the results from my October bloods) and that I needed to see an endocrinologist, A.S.A.P. It took awhile to find an endrocinologist who was taking new patients. (I never did find one who took my insurance but that's a subject for a different thread.) On March 31, 2008, I was diagnosed with an form of hypothyroidism called Hashimoto's disease (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567). Like psoriasis and PA, Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disease. My internist, my endrocrinologist and my rheumy all think that it's related to my psoriasis. (I'm overdue for an appointment with my derm.) We're still adjusting the meds. Fatigue and increased sensitivity to cold are some of Hashimoto's symptoms: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=sympto ms.

I hope this helps.

Mike

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** Originally posted by Mcmom52 **

hello...I am new here...I use a heating pad during the day as needed.

I use an electric blanket on my bed. I have found that being nice and warm is the only way I feel comfortable. as someone mentioned earlier, the electric blanket does have it's inconsistencies...and I might try her suggestion of a heated mattress pad. I have often wondered if those were better.

but if I were you...I'd invest in either a heating blanket or mattress pad.

best wished for better health to all.

McMom52

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

Boy, MikeK, just what I need is another disease, but thanks. I go to the doctor Feb 2 and I have made a note to see if they have checked.

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** Originally posted by rosc2112 **

Ohhh yeah I forgot to mention the heating pad. It's a "Thera-Therm" digital moist heat pad, it's awesome. It produces moist heat without having to wet anything, and the digital thermostat goes from 86f-166f, for 1-60 mins. Best heating pad I ever bought (well, short of a T-Pump & T-Pad, but those units are $300+ even refurb'd.)

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** Originally posted by ahlfan **

I use a rice bag that you heat in the microwavvee. I use that every night while watching TV. But for overnight, I love my electric blanket. I like to have cool air to sleep, but I need to keep warm. Depending on where I ache the most, I tuck the blanket there. Sometimes it is around my knee, other nights it might be my back or shoulder. I find that I am not near as achy in the morning when I use the blanket.
Most nights I turn it on about 15 minutes before we are going to bed. It is great to crawl into a warm bed.
It was one of the best investments we did!
Jean

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** Originally posted by missnatalie **

I use one on my bed, it sure does help me. I also have a heatdish, it works really good, and the heat feels great when your bones are frozen.

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** Originally posted by RichJ **

hi miss natalie,
welcome to the p family. you have meet some of the wonderful people on here and will find alot of great info. welcome and nice to meet you.

try and have a good day all

richard

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** Originally posted by robwilliams **

[QUOTE=Rolacoy We keep the house temperature at night about 65 degrees. Sometimes I do not sleep as worm as I would like and 1/2 the time I sleep in my longjohns.


Rolacoy,

Why in the world would keep your house temperature this low at night if you have any autoimmune disease? I don't intend to be sending a wise crack here but, I just came from my Rheumatologist who told me I should never let myself get cold. I always keep my house temp at 75 degrees. And if it gets colder outside, I turn it up to 78 degrees. My wife, the poor soul, walks around in shorts all the time. She never complains, even though I know she is hot. I know there are some people that may say, that would result in a very expensive heating bill. My response is, you can't put a price on comfort. I cut back on other things just so I can be warm and comfortable. Heck, in the summer, when our pool is open, I keep the water temperature at 95 degrees. I love to swim but I hate cold water. I really should be living in Florida. Maybe in another life.

Rob

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

Rob, I do like the house about 65 degrees, even in the daytime we seldom set it above 70. I just like the cool air. when the temp outside hits 50 the longjohns go on. that is most of the winter. I have a real warm robe to wear when I set and watch TV. I never set still much so I stay comfortable. I best best and warmest bed is in our motor home. I will post a link later tonight, I am heading out to church. Also I will post some pictures of a bed that I am building.

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** Originally posted by Rolacoy **

I told you that I am a bit strange. Here is the bed/computer console that I am building.

http://www.waskomtexas.com/spaceship/chair_spaceship.html

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