Affordable treatment/light bulbs for inverse psoriasis

** Originally posted by LCarvalho **

Hi, everyone,

My wife has inverse psoriasis and although about 2-5% of her body shows this, it is very embarrassing and annoying for her, and thus for me too.

I wonder if anyone knows of a more affordable treatment than the one with Raptiva (which I just learned costs about US$14,000 per year).

She has been taking ultraviolet light baths but with little results, maybe because the lamps have too wide an area of action. I'd appreciate if someone could let me know of affordable lamp bulbs which we could buy and have for home treatment.

Thanks in advance,

LCarvalho

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** Originally posted by GitOverIt **

you might want to read my post under "Alternate Treatments" about allergy testing ....I have inverse and plaque P, plus scalp P thrown in for a little variety.
I have my own personal theory about inverse simply from my own experience of reactions.....it is my opinion only.....
I first got inverse maybe seven or so years ago anyway a long time ago....I discovered it came from eating sugar....so if I didn't eat anything with sugar it went away.......as the years progressed I could cheat and eat but if I ate too much....back it came......I played this game for a long time.....
now I'm on the rotation diet that was developed around the foods that I'm sensitive to........(see my post)
I ask my doctor before I even took the test if she thought it could be an allergy....her response was ..."Well its an auto-immune disease too....so why not?" and I had noticed that certain foods caused an itching frenzy which to me was a big clue.

The reason I even thought to have it done was an article I had read from a Dr. Wright M.D.....that said and again I quote.

"If you are one of the 5 million people in the U.S. suffering from psoriasis, you know just how resistant to treatment it can be. Conventional medicine generally treats psoriasis with topical cortisone preparations While these can alleviate the symtoms of P, there are a number potential side effects including bruising, skin color changes, and dilated blood vessels. In addition, it is common for a patient to become resistant to the cortisone preparations after several months of treatment, which means that dosages must be consistantly increased.

Food allergies and sensitivities are common in most cases of
psoriasis, so thorough testing and desensitization ( food rotation)should be done under the supervision of a physician. Once allergies have been determined and treated, there are a number of vitamins, minerals, and herbs that can drastically improve P."unquote

Anyway I'm the guinea pig here ....as I'm on the rotation diet after finding 13 diferent food sensitivities.......it will be intersting to see if the inverse improves or hopefully goes away.

hope this helps...oh one more thing....My DH built a sunning area for me to sun myself ala nude ...for the inverse....didn't help at all....it did help the plaque....which made me think that there might be different types of help for different types of P

...the food test is a blood test that gives the 92 different most known reactors to an allergy......it costs $250.00 Medicare paid for mine........

hope this isn't too controversial for most....but hey ...that's me!!!
I also hope you may get some benefit from our forum....for your wife....good luck

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** Originally posted by EdR **

Hi LCarvalho,

Welcome to the forums.

If you look at the NPF's information sheet on inverse psoriasis you'll see that topicals (steroids, tar, dovonex, tazorac, anthralin) are listed as the primary treatments for inverse psoriasis, and ultraviolet light is not. Because inverse psoriasis can be infected by opportunistic fungal and yeast infections, it's even recommended that you take an oral antifungal agent along with whatever topical you're using. I've also read on other sites that Protopic and Elidel can be used to treat inverse psoriasis.

Best wishes to you and your wife.

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