pea sized lumps under the skin

Has anyone experienced clusters of painful pea sized lumps just under the skin surface? They are mostly on the sides of the body.

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Yes, I have but have not been to the doctor yet to find out about it due to not having insurance at this time... Let me know if you find out something. PLEASE

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Yes. I was diagnosed with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis in March, 2002, so I've had it for ten years now. The lumps will come and go, and they are painful. My doctor says they are erythema nodosum, but I had that when I was first diagnosed and they were larger. These are truly the size of peas, and can move a bit when you push at them with your fingers, but it hurts. Sometimes my pain is through the roof, but doctors don't seem to believe me.

I too, lost my job because of state proration, now I hurt so much it takes time to do things, even typing hurts. It's extremely frustrating!

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I felt little marble like clusters on my left side. My doctor said it was just fatty tissue and not to worry.

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I had bead like lumps under the skin of my arms and other broader, flatter aliens under the skin of my hands and fingers. There were lots but not particularly clustered. I also have olive size lumps near my ribs. Pain seemed to depend more on the location. (Not all were painful.)

The lumps in the arm/fingers were first misdiagnosed as "fat." Within a few months I asked my dermatologist to remove some of them surgically because they were painful when bumped and bothersome. He did biopsies first and the biopsy came back as non-caseating granulomas. I then went through the usual list of tests. Sarc was confirmed in my lungs as well.

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Are non-caseating granulomas a specific kind of granuloma?

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From Wiki:

An important feature of granulomas is whether or not they contain necrosis. Necrosis refers to dead cells that, under the microscope, appear as a mass of formless debris with no nuclei present. A related term, "caseation" (literally: turning to cheese) refers to a form of necrosis that, to the unaided eye (i.e., without a microscope), appears cheese-like ("caseous"), and is typically (but not uniquely) a feature of the granulomas of tuberculosis. The identification of necrosis in granulomas is important because granulomas with necrosis tend to have infectious causes.[1] There are several exceptions to this general rule, but it nevertheless remains useful in day-to-day diagnostic pathology.

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Like J-A, I also developed pea sized lumps which ultimately led to my sarcoidosis diagnosis. Mine are mostly clustered around my elbows and upper arms, a few more around my knees and on my fingers. They were misdiagnosed as "rheumatoid nodules" as I had been complaining about joint pain and fatigue for years (I was tested for rheumatoid factor and was negative, so wasn't diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, but the nodules were dismissed as not significant enough for further evaluation at first...)

As the nodules became more numerous and painful on bumping, a biopsy was done, and they were found to be non-caseating granulomas... more tests, then, also like J-A, sarcoid was diagnosed as in both skin and lungs. Finally explained the shortness of breath I'd also been complaining of for about a year or so before, which had been attributed to asthma...

The docs tell me if they surgically remove them, they'll just grow back. Have been on plaquenil for a year and a half now, but I'm still getting new bumps all the time, so I'm not really seeing the benefits of the drug as yet....

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You've got some amazing patience. I am pretty sure I couldn't endure a year and a half on a drug without progress. Is it supposed to take that long?

FWIW My biopsy removed quite a lot of one of the flatter "extra padding" alien under the skin of my arm that was painful when bumped and it has not grown back. Much of the lump/padding that was removed from the finger for biopsy had grown back.

Steroid injections in to the finger lumps (painfully affecting joints/tendons/whatever) did result in those aliens subsiding for a fair amount of time.

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lol, no J-A, it's not supposed to take that long for plaquenil to work! Altho I have to say my fatigue, while still bothersome, isn't as bad as it was, and my lung function has stabilized at around 75% since I've been on it, so my docs think it is helping somewhat. And plaquenil does have a relatively low risk of side effects (I do get my eyes checked every 6 months).

Both my rheumy and my pulmy tell me that the side effects of prednisone, as well as other meds they could use for sarcoidosis, are too much to risk for my relatively "mild" case...but I'm really bothered mostly by joint/tendon/muscle (/whatever, as you aptly put it!) pain, and they say that's not due to sarcoid, but osteoarthritis! I'm not convinced....

Maybe time to go to a dermatologist, or a different rheumy, for a new opinion....Was it your dermatologist who's done your biopsies and steroid injections?

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I have the knots on my forearms, hands, fingers and knees. I have had a few on my lower legs. Some are large but most are pea size. As someone else stated I can push them and they move. They come and go...some lasting as long as a couple of years. They are not painful unless bumped. I have one that developed shortly after I had an IV in my hand where the tube went in. I'll just live with them for now. I'm not interested in any more pred at this time.

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Beaglefan-
You said: Both my rheumy and my pulmy tell me that the side effects of prednisone, as well as other meds they could use for sarcoidosis, are too much to risk for my relatively "mild" case...

My sarc is probably technically mild as well. Certainly not as bad as many here at least as far as the impact of the sarc itself organs. Thus no need for the steroids or other meds for the sarc at this point. Not that I'd take steroids again anyway. I took them before- nearly thirty years ago and well, it wasn't pretty. The rage and the 3lb. a day weight gain... that was impossible to lose.


You said: "but I'm really bothered mostly by joint/tendon/muscle (/whatever, as you aptly put it!) pain, and they say that's not due to sarcoid, but osteoarthritis! I'm not convinced....

I wouldn't be convinced either. I have had arthritis in my knee for over two decades. So, I know arthritis pain well. The pain I've come to have in the last year dwarfs that in intensity not to mention that it is in nearly my entire body. Last week, I decided that it was time to do something about it besides take pain pills. I talked with my doc about it and have now started a medicine called Lyrica (at a low dose). It's too soon to tell but, so far so good. I have had a few hours each day that my legs were not like walking on painful sticks and other general body pains were gone. My flexibility has greatly improved as well. I think it would be worth your while to pursue treatment for the pain that isn't just pain meds.

You said: Maybe time to go to a dermatologist, or a different rheumy, for a new opinion....Was it your dermatologist who's done your biopsies and steroid injections?

Yes, my dermatologist did both the biopsies and steroid injections. I'm not sure that most Dermatologists would do either the biopsies or the steroid injections. Even though my injections went o.k., considering where they have to go (amongst nerves and tendons and such)- I'd probably prefer an ortho or neuro doc do them.

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Yeah, I definitely have those lumps. Mine are broader like Reese's peanut butter cups, right under my skin. They don't hurt like erythema nodusum that hurt like a son of a b!!! I too wonder if they're fat pads, but one doctor referred me to a Sarc doctor, which I haven't found yet. Waiting on my rheumatologist appointment in December for blood work results. But it's interesting to me that these lumps are on my legs and it's my legs that are the most effected by sarc. This is some weird disease!!!

Blessings,

Judy

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Yes, I have this lumps also. They are very painful and sometimes the area where they are located will have a purple colored bruise. They will go away and come back.

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