Best Climate in the US for Sarcoidosis Suffers?

I wanted to start a discussion with people whom moved around the US and noticed that some areas were better or worse for Sarcoidosis symptoms. There is no magic place where Sarcoidosis just goes away but I have lived in several areas of the US and can say that I had a much a harder time in certain areas.

Worst:
Las Vegas
2nd worst Denver
3rd worst St. Louis
4th worst Tampa

Best:
Seattle
2nd Best Boston

For me, Sunlight is the killer. It causes swelling, dizziness, mental confusion, and extreme fatigue. When I lived in Las Vegas for example I felt almost normal at night but during the "light hours" I suffered horribly. I have also come to believe that changes in barometric pressure also trigger Sarcoidosis symptoms. For the most part if the sun never came out I think I would be cured.

Seattle is damp, cold, and rainy 9 months a year so its not ideal. You tend to stay in the house all the time. Boston is nice in the spring and fall but the winters are brutal. No matter where I live I seem to be healthiest during the winter months since solar radiation is at its minimum.

While I'm not about to follow the Marshall Protocol, I have to say that he is on to something when we talks about avoiding all sunlight. Ok your turn.. If you have lived in multiple areas of the US, share your experiences..

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i'm an ohion,but winter does seem the best.since vitamin D is no good for most sarcies i live like my house is a cave,blinds closed and when out in sunshine wear protection.

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Sunlight not a problem for me with the exception of photosensitivity.

I prefer dry, cold, sunny climates.

Heat and humidity is the killer for me although I tolerate dry heat reasonably well.

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I have lived in Wisconsin. New York and SFO. I hate Wi due to extreme cold and prefer SFO. Heat and sunlight is not a problem for me. I feel more active and energetic when it is hot and sunny. Temps like 85 to 105 F are my favorite. Cloudy and windy weather does me in though rain and moisture is no issue as long as it is hot.

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Well, as I read up on Sarcoidosis, I see that Sarcoidosis is an auto-immune type of disease and auto-immune diseases cause the immune system to be over-active and attack the good and bad cells in your body. It seems like your immune system is slowly killing you because it attacks everything. Eliminating sunlight slows down the immune response. (IE helps) In my case, sunlight is the main trigger.

This is why so many people take prednisone for Sarcoidosis. It suppresses the immune system. When I have tried prednisone I feel better but it causes severe weight gain and is also a one way ticket to diabetes so I stay away from it.

I am thinking a cement block house in So California with solar shutters and living like a vampire might be the ideal solution but I cannot afford to live there.

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I have lived in WV and now Concord NC. Neither climate has been kind. I can't spend any time in the sun. The weather here is better in the Fall, and winter.
Angela

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I have lived in Norteast Pennsylvania, now in Gastonia,NC The added sunlight of the south felt good before the sarc diag a few weeks ago, but noticed the effects all too soon. This time of year in PA was perfect, late springlike, tempt never above 90 degrees

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I am at my best with sunlight. Gary

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That's interesting. I'm on the windy tip of Long Island in New York. It's perfectly temperate here. Not too hot in the summer, everyone comes out here for the cool breezes, not too cold in the winter, surrounded by water we stay kinda warm. As far as sun, it's overcast a lot, but I stay indoors anyway. Always did that. Work evenings or nights. Yeah, I do have bat-blood flowing through my veins!!!

Blessings,

Judy

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I am shocked that some people feel better in the sun.

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Sarc is not an autoimmune disease. It is an inflammatory disease.

The reason some people with sarc have trouble in the sun is due to Vitamin D dysregulation. Many of us find that our Vitamin D25 level is extremely low and our Vitamin D1,25 is normal or high. When our body produces too much D1,25 we can suffer from increased fatigue and potential kidney problems. People who suffer with vitamin D dysregulation should avoid the sun and avoid consuming food and beverages with added Vitamin D. This is not generally an issue with autoimmune diseases.

This is why people with sarc should not take Vitmin D supplements until both the levels of D25 and D1,25 have been checked.

Not all people with sarc have this problem and those that do not have no problem in the sun.

Bev

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Hey Bev,

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Bev,

I am truly impressed! Informative, clear, concise, easy to understand.

Thanks for the explanation.

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Might I add that for people who do not suffer from vitamin D dysregulation that avoiding sunlight may contribute to depression.

Daylight plays a very important role in the production of hormones which contribute to our mental health. When I first moved to Holland from Florida I suffered from SDD (seasonal depressive disorder) for years due to the drastic difference in daylight hours.

I am in no way advocating sunbathing and I do feel that anyone who has received a diagnosis of sarcoidosis should have their D levels checked. For those who do suffer from vitamin D dysregulation, this is a serious complication and should not be taken lightly.

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I live in the San Francisco Bay Area and wouldn't trade it for anything... but occasional trips to New York and Paris are great to break the monotony of perfect weather! :)

Perfect... Not too hot, not too cold... Not too much sun, not cloudy all day long... No real storms, but enough rain in the winter to wash my car (I'm not wasting my precious time washing cars!) and make everything look clear and pretty... not humid, but not so dry that it makes your skin crack...

In short - PERFECT!
When I arrived here 30 years ago, one of the first things I said "This is The Garden of Eden!" Yes, it is!

OK, OK, don't shout at me "BUT WHAT'S WITH THE EARTHQUAKES???"
Yes, once in a while there's an earthquake (as a matter of fact, there was one on my very first night in this area!), and we had some damage in the BIG one in 1989, but earthquakes are rare, and comparing the consequences to those of the yearly tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, freezes, heat waves in other places... need I say more?

Oh, yes, housing cost is quite high (in some areas, ridiculously high), but there are some areas around here that are not as expensive as those "populated" by the HP/Google/Yahoo/Apple/Facebook/etc. folks.

As to high taxes, we can do something about it every few years at election time... and if we don't, we shouldn't whine about it.

p.s for full disclosure, we don't have in California the wonderful comprehensive-treatment Sarcoidosis clinics that exist in some other areas (Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, New York, etc.)... oh, maybe there aren't many patients with sarcoidosis in California???... hmmmm... what a thought!

p.s.s. I don't have a problem being in the sun, but I don't overdo it (just 20-40 min of arms/legs exposed 3-4 times a week) because I want to keep my youthful appearance :)

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Someone asked me in a PM "what about not having 4 seasons" in California... so:

1. We have two seasons - rainy season and non-rainy season... so this is 50% of all the seasons a person can take, and that's good enough for me... plus, I don't have to worry about being caught in a rain during the summer.

2. What's wrong with eternal spring? I thought this is what we want to Paradise to be!

3. For all the money I'm saving in very little need in heating the house in the winter, no need in an air conditioner in the summer (we don't have one), no need in coats, boots, gloves, hats, etc., and extra space to store winter clothing and bedding, no need in shoveling snow or repairing the house because of damage caused by the elements, I can drive a few hours to the sierra mountains or beautiful Lake Tahoe and enjoy the snow and the leaves there... and come home to eternal spring!

So, guys and gals, are you moving to California?
If more of us will be here, maybe some of the great doctors who live in places with bad weather will move here and we can have a great sarcoidosis clinic, like the ones in Cleveland, Ann Arbor, etc. right here in California.

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Hi auntbev,

Very well explained. But that's what my misery is. I have very low vit d3( less than 10) but my d1,25 is normal( 47, almost middle of range), PTH is normal, serum calcium is normal and urine test is normal. All my blood tests are normal including ACE, ESR, CRP, TSH, T3, T4 etc.

And sunlight makes me active while cloudy /windy /winter makes me dull. More the sunlight and more the heat, more active I am. When even normal people run away at 110 F sun, I sit in the open sun and feel good. I pick the sunny seats at the events as most people donot pick them (This makes sure I get good seats).

That is a puzzle for which I have no answer. Does it mean, I do not have Sarc? Don't know. Doctors also have no answer(no surprise).

In one year after Sarc finding (no biopsy), I am symptom free without medications( Thanks GOD), never got SOB and my oxygen saturation is 100% in last 3 visits. It has never been lower than 99% at any time. My adenopathy of hilar nodes got 50% plus resolved in about 2 months( that's why the doctors decided against biopsy as it was a test prior to biopsy decision), 95% plus in 6 months and fully resolved in 10 months radiography.


My case seems like dysregulations but no impact or symptoms. Sarc is surprising and everything does not seem to follow a logic as we may think.

UTL

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I live in Denver and it's perfect for me: I don't have a vitamin D problem, and the sun brightens my spirits. My sister lived in Seattle, and she hated it- all the gloom and dampness most of the year, even though it was so green. I visited often, and felt affected by the "moldiness".

Each of us has to find the ideal place for ourselves...

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Phoenix = HELL in short. My pain is 10X worse in the heat. Even though I have severe arthritis, I am a rare one that I am in less pain in the cold. Used to live in northern California (Shasta County) and did well in the winters even in the snow.. Had to move to Phoenix when I lost ability to drive (sarc took its toll on my eyes) and had to move closer to family for support. After 6 years here not sure it was worth the move.

I also cannot tolerate sun. I did not know the sun issues until my pulmonologist here told me he wanted me to stay out of it at all cost.. not to even be outside in shad because indirect sun is also bad for me. But sun is sun no matter where you live. Just as bad in the winter as it is in the summer. It is the heat that gets me.

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Challenged,

You are not rare. Worst possible treatment for arthritis is heat. Arthritis is inflammation. Inflammation is heat. Applying heat to arthritis may feel good initially but actually worsens the condition. Cold is the recommended therapy for arthritis.

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I was diagnosed with neuro-sarc in winter though. Lived in London at the time. Was Vitamin-D-deficient and the doctor prescribed me Vitamin D supplement!!
I did not take it regularly though. Not much changes observed. Back in sun-kissed Malaysia and I seem to have receovered fully - finggers crossed!

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