Warming devices to prevent Raynauds attacks

I have been searching the web for devices available for warming the hands and reducing Raynaud's attacks. The most promising ones seem to be Firzone infrared heated gloves with Li polymer batteries (though these might be a little bulky). Then there are Thermogloves Rechargeable heated gloves made from a thin flexible material which would make manipulating things with your hands easier. Another type of glove, Prolotex Far Infrared gloves that don't rely on any form of battery would seem ideal.
Then there are the handwarmers, specifically the Thermo-slim and HotRox rechargeable units and the Zippo handwarmer that uses lighter fuel.
I wonder if anyone has any experience with any of these devices. It would be really useful to hear about them to help decide which device/s to purchase..
I also came across Thermax Warming Cream - I wonder how well that works.

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Don't buy the Raynauds Gloves that have Far Infared heat in them they don't help very much. You are better to wear heavy mittens in the winter. I bought two different sets, the light and the heavy before i saw postings on this site saying not to buy them. I haven't used any of the other stuff yet.

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I use Winter Silk extra warm glove liners and good quality ski gloves for outdoors. I also carry the chemical hand warmers with me. They are single use and are activated when you remove them from the package and they are exposed to the air. They last for 10 hours. I keep them in my pockets for extra warmth when needed, especially when I am someplace that has a lot of air conditioning.

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I use the chemical hand warmer packs often. I keep them in the car, purse, pockets as a back up. I also wear or carry mittens in stores as they are usually cold enough to trigger a flare up. One of the best tips I learned from this site is to buy inexpensive socks to carry as mittens. Cut an opening in the heel area so you can put your thumb through it and just above the toe area cut a line across the top of the sock so you can put your fingers through when you need more finger movement. The sock mittens are easy to stuff in a coat or jean pocket and also work nicely if you need to tone down the heat of the chemical hand warmers.

Hope you get information that works for you.

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Thanks for the replies I've had so far. They have certainly helped narrow down the possibilities. I live in South Africa, so getting the chemical warmers regularly couldbe a hassle, hence my interest in the rechargeable hand warmers. Hopefully I may hear from someone who has tried these. Thanks again and the best of success in warding off Raynauds attacks.

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I live in Vermont so having gloves that keep my hands warm is a must. I received a pair of Core Heat gloves from Gerbings this winter and they are a god send. They are nice warm winter gloves with micro wires that run over the palm, back of the hand, and around all of the fingers and the best part is they are battery operated. The battery is a removable battery pack that you recharge and they last anywhere from a 90 minutes on the highest setting to several hours at a lower setting. They are expensive (about $200US), but they have a lifetime warranty and the quality is up there with any pricey ski glove on the market. I highly recommend them.

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I am just going to buy these - http://thermogloves.eu/?XTCsid=08d24df6c77ab032b25cea8e18460862.
One hour ago I have triedy them in nearby shop and came home to search on internet. Definitely these are the best choice for me because they are not bulky, easy to operate. I appreciated also soft and comfortable material they are made from.

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Thanks to all the replies I received I have purchased some really effective products. Thermoglove Rechargeable heated gloves and Thermoslim rechargeable hand warmers. Great products that really work and are helping me stave off the development of finger ulcers. The gloves are great and one doesn't lose too much finger flexibility, a problem with many other heated gloves. Great service from Verseo.com. Unfortunately the Thermax Warming Cream doesn't seem to work for me - any tips on how it should be applied would be welcome. I also ordered Core Heat S2 gloves from Gerbings which were delivered without the batteries and charger, so I haven't had a chance to try them out. No response from Gerbings in spite of 3 e-mails. Service from Gerbings looks questionable!!

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Www.wristies.com has some things I really like. They are fingerless gloves and some have a built in pocket for hand warmers. I wear wristies any time I think I might get cold. I keep several pairs in my car and in my coat pockets. My fingers are curled up and no way could I wear regular gloves and mittens are too bulky. I tried kid size mittens, they fit over my hands, but barely go to my wrists. A couple of years ago, KK, the girl who invented wristies, was at the national conference. I told her I had about 20 pairs in all colors, plus now all my granddaughters wear them too. Hope you find what works for you!

Pam

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I was diagnosed with Raynauds in December, 2011. Just recently, I have been diagnosed with CREST syndrome. I am in the process of having more tests done to figure out if any other internal organs are affected at this point.
I used the Thermogloves last winter while skiing. I purchased two extra sets of batteries so that I always had charged batteries and I didn't have to worry about having the gloves on high when I needed the extra warmth. I used the gloves as liners and then purchased a quality leather ski glove that fit comfortably over the top of the Thermogloves. This setup was bulky, but it allowed me to continue skiing. I had to get used to the bulky battery pack location. It is on the underside of the wrist and it needs to be up higher in the gauntlet so that it doesn't irritate the wrist. These gloves were lifesavers for me as they allowed me to continue doing a sport that I love. I also use boot heaters. Unfortunately, my feet were more of a problem because of swelling issues. I do use the chemical handwarmers when out walking. They did not offer me enough warmth to use for skiing as they didn't do anything to keep the fingers warm.
Anybody have any ideas on how to control foot swelling?
I am ready to try a paraffin bath for my hands as the skin is getting tight over my knuckles. Any comments on this treatment?

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The Thermax warming cream did nothing for me as far as warming my hands. It felt good as a moisturizing cream, though.

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Core Heat is the only way to go. If you go on sclermo foundation and go to store there will be a promo code so gloves will be around 160.00. They have saved me so many times. The fingers warm too. They look like an outdoor item and they really are but their the best of the best. I use the usual warmers too but last winter we lost power and Core Heat saved me!!!! Rechargable battery comes with it

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Can someone please describe a raynauds attack? Besides the purplish coloring, does anyone get tingling in the finger tips.

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You should start a new topic with this question and you will get lots of responses. Everyone is different....my fingers go white and really hurt, then purple and tingly, then red and finally back to normal. Usually lasts about 10-15 minutes.

Pam

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I'm from Chicago and we get some brutal winters here. The wind will cut through you like a knife. I have Raynaud's in both my hands and feet. For my feet I use sock liners which is just a thinner sock made to hold heat in and keep moisture out. I wear them under my 100% wool sock. This really helps a lot. For my hands, I don't like the bulkiness of those battery operated gloves plus I find they don't work so well for me. I wear glove liners and Isotoner glove that also have a thin liner. Isotoners fit very well and help hold in the heat. Nothing is perfect however whatever I can do to stop an attack. I have Raynaud’s & Crest so keeping my core body temp up is very important. Winter time I wear layers usually 3 , a t-shirt, a thermal long sleeve t-shirt and the a sweatshirt. The remaining part of the year I keep a sweatshirt, gloves, hat, and jacket all handy. I have everything in a backpack that I can just put in the car and go. Raynaud’s affects more than just your hands. My attacks can last 10 minutes to a few hours depend on how my body is reacting any giving day. Hope this helps. Just look at my picture that was taking on the beach in Flordia mid-september, most people have shorts on I'm wearing jackets and scarfs. So each of us react differently depends on what you have with Raynaud's, where you live, and how long you have had it

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Jeminirose-Where do you buy your sock and hand liners?

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TANNINGIRL, you can get gloveliners at any big5 or outdoorstore. My husband orders them for be from cabellas.com and their good quality. I have no issues with my feet anylonger with the feet liners. The fingers are tricky as you still need to use them and can't always bundle them up.

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Am I one of the few who wears mittens. I have found ones at craft sales where the mittens are made from old sweaters and most of the time they are lined. The only time I found them not to work is when I shovel snow. the handle of the shovel will eventually put a hole in the mitten. As long as I don't shovel they mittens for me work great.

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I purchase most of mine at Bass Pro Shop, however you can get them at most sporting goods store or outdoor store. This is what I buy:
http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-ThermoLite-Liner-Socks-for-Men-1-Pair/produc t/40987/100246 4.99
http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-Diabetic-Comfort-Merino-Wool-Crew-Sock/produ ct/11091505011312/254109 6.99 I'm not a diabetic however I buy these for the add room with the sock liner.

http://www.basspro.com/Glacier-Glove-Glove-Liners/product/10210394/116818 5.99

http://www.totes-isotoner.com/product/isotoner-womens-spandex-gloves-knit-f leece 34.00

I haven't tried these one yet but I most likely will this year.
http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-Gobi/40%C2%B0-Below-Socks-with-Liner-Combo-1 -Set/product/65467/118706 13.99

I was thinking of contacting the Alaska Highway Patrol and ask them what they use for their officers to stay warm. I can't think of a better place to get advice to stay warm. What do you think? Good luck and stay warm.

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Thanks for all the information jeminirose and others! I have always thought that mittens kept my hands warmer because seem like i had less attacks but maybe the liners would make a difference too!

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