Hot AND Cold at the same time?!

With the autumn drop in temperature, it was very chilly in my house the last two nights. I tossed and turned all night because I was both hot and cold (actually shivering) at the same time. My body felt so cold yet my underarms were sweating. How is this possible? Anyone else ever have this? It's the craziest thing!

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I have the same problem. What works best for me is to keep my house at a constant warm temperature. When I can control the room temperature, I dress in layers that can easily be peeled off. Sometimes eating or drinking makes me perspire while my hands and feet still feel cold. At night I wear socks on my feet and a long sleeved shirt and then have layers of lightweight blankets.

If your clothes get wet from the sweat that can chill you pretty fast. Our bodies have a hard time regulating the heat. I wear silk long underwear and socks because it is a natural fiber and can wick away the moisture.

Maybe it has something to do with menopause.

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I go through this same type of quick-changing hot and cold feeling. One minute I'm drenched in sweat, and the next I'm freezing. Sometimes it's both at once and can change really fast. I know some of it is r/t hot flashes from menopause, and there are issues with Raynaud's being systemic and not only in your hands, feet, and face. I keep a knit wrap handy and throw it around my shoulders until I feel warmed up when I get chilled. Keeping my neck, shoulders, and upper arms covered really helps. I will wear it to bed when I'm reading or on the computer, then remove it when I'm ready to get under the covers. Having a heating pad for your feet, or an electric blanket to warm the bed before you get in can help. There are issues with our temperature regulating system that are part of auto-immune disorders, and also with menopause. I think we just need to adjust and learn to live with it.

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I sleep with layers so I can bundle up or kick 'em off as needed. I went through menopause almost 9 years ago and had been "hot-flash free" for a number of years, so for me it's probably just the SD - however, I know that night sweats are also a symptom of adrenal dysfunction (too much cortisol I think) and with the stress from SD, I wouldn't be surprised if our adrenals are over-stimulated, indirectly causing of many of the symptoms attributed to SD.

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Yes, I have the same simultaneous hot-and-cold nonsense -- mittens on my blue hands, heating pad on my blue feet, and fanning my red face. It's nuts. Wearing silk as a first layer definitely helps, especially at night.

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Thanks for posting this. I'm not crazy after all.

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Guys share your same frustrations, at least I do. I equate it with radical exterior changes in temperature. I do all the same as mentioned before for relief.

No menapause, but maybe its my gay gene.

Best
Cash

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BarbMarie131-Thanks for posting, I have the same problem. We can also think we are crazy with the symptoms of this disease until we post and see that other people have the same issues.

MaggiMay-Never thought of silk, I will have to try that.

sweaters-Ardenal glands might be my answer because it seems that I get hot/sweaty when I move and/or start thinking(something that might be considered a little stressful...)

My body will sweat behind my knees, inside my elbows and you can see the prespiration on the tops of my hands and forehead. I also am hot & cold, toss and turn some nights.

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Same here. I go from covering up and turning on my electric blanket because I'm so cold and a few minutes later I'm opening windows and turning the fan on. During the day I'm constantly putting on and taking off clothes. It makes me so tired! I thought it was menopause too.

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Yes and +1 to bedlam_ensued

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Like the other posters, I have this problem too. I dress in layers. Besides the Raynaud's, I have 3 other conditions that may cause temperature problems (including menopause). People ask me why I am wearing a feather jacket and ski hat inside. I tell them I live in a different universe than they do!

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So, what is the reason for this HOT & COLD?????? Menopause???Scleroderma???Medication???WHAT?????

How can we get to the bottom of this...my doctors don't have a clue...or just we need to learn to live and adjust with these symptoms like many other symptoms we have from Scleroderma.
Sorry, but maybe you quessed already but these sypmtoms are one of my chief complaints at this time, it also cause me not to sleep good at night, luckily I'm back to sleeping 11-12 hrs a night(so I get some extra rest).

I have past that menopausal state, but was told that I could still have night/day sweats. I take CellCept-3000mg per day, Lasix-30mg per day, Baby Asprin-81mg per day, Metoprolol Succ ER-25mg per day, Aciphex-20mg twice a day, Zantac-300mg per day

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I love, "I live in a different universe than you".

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Yep same here hot & cold, toss & turn. Same old, same old.

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Yes, Dr. Steen told me that scleroderma patients tend to have excessive vasoactivity. So the blood vessels are always vascillating between vasoconstriction and vasodilation.

Sometimes if your peripheral blood vessels dilate excessively (like in the red warming phase of Raynaud's, there might be enough blood directed to hands and feet radiating out your body heat so that your central core becomes cold. The reverse can be true in the blue and white chilling phase of Raynaud's. Peripheral vasoconstriction is the body's way of retaining core heat so that you don't freeze to death in cold. But in Raynaud's the reaction again is excessive in the extreme.

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DaisyDo-Thanks for that info

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I have the same problem. One minute I am so cold and then I start to perspire and have to get out of bed to dry off. Glad to know I'm not alone.

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Weird feeling....At night in bed I will start to get hot and perspire and it feels like my skin in moving, it happens mostly on the inside where my legs and arms are bent. Well this morning I had this happen to just my right arm/elbow and realized that it's not my skin moving but the perspiration forming. BOY is it a weird feeling though.

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I try to keep the temperature around me as stable as possible. My experience is that any subtle change in the surrounding temp will set my body to trying to adjust, and that seems to be what it cannot do. If I am cold, it may take a long time, but I will eventually warm up - for a second or two - but then it goes right past warm to sweating within seconds. When I stop sweating I am freezing again, but the good news is that if I was having a raynaud's attack at the time it's usually gone.
Agree with 05-11-2010 that sometimes when I start concentrating hard it starts as well. (Embarrassing at work when I am trying to talk in a meeting.)
I dress in layers, and always wear a jacket or sweatshirt with pockets that I can hunker down in, or throw off quickly. I do both frequently.
All of the scleroderma doctors I have discussed this with, including Steen, have told me it's menopause (i.e. "not their problem").
Cash5436 - thanks for chiming in. It helps those of us who are being told we are just hormone deficient old ladies (by old lady doctors who don't seem to be having this problem), to know that there might be more to it. Someday, someone will figure it out. But I suspect it won't be soon.
Until then, we are all just crazy, but we're in good company.

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Sounds oh so familiar - I get all bundled up in the morning and get in my car to go to work, frozen fingers and all (Raynaud's attack like clockwork every morning...) get into the car & crank up the heat as high and as strong as I can get it. 10 minutes later, I turn down the heat and a few minutes after that I've got the windows down to cool off.
I do the sweater on/sweater off, then repeat, at work all the time, as well as the covers on/covers off all night long.

I don't buy the menopause thing - been there, done that about 9 years ago and it aint the same. I pointed out to my doc that I hadn't had hot flashes for years - he just shrugged and made some comment about some people continue have them for years...(the operative word here being CONTINUE) and he didn't address why, if it's related to menopause, they might suddenly start up again.

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