Cold weather & IPF

I just moved from Florida back to Maine. Hold on there was a good reason, I'm not crazy. I was diagnosed in June 09 and after all my research, I don't know how long I have. Well, my son, wife and 2 grandsons live in ME (that's where I'm from 1950-2002), so I decided I should be around them while I can still function.
I moved back to ME in April 2012 and was put on oxygen at 4lpm contiuous at sleep and exertion. August, I was told 6lpm at sleepi and exertion. Sometimes while exerting myself I need 7lmp
Back to my question, how will the cold affect me?

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I was oly diagnosed this past February and I'm not sure how the cold will affect you. I do know when I take my great grandson to school I usually wear a scarf around my face because I start coughing alot. The dr. also told me when I get winded sit down regardless when you are at...even on someone's front steps/porch or whatever and rest. So as the time goes I guess I'll learn how to work with my IPF. By the way I live in PA...so we do have cold weather and even the hot humid weather in the summer bothered me.
Go figure!!! Duka814 enjoy your family and especially those grandsons. We just had our second great granddaughter in May and I just hope I will get to see her go to school, but only God knows when I will be called home.

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Hello Duka

I can't speak for the weather in USA, we live in Uk but also have a house in Normandy, France. Weatherwise, UK and northern France are similar, but Normandy can be wet in Spring time. I don't like heat and humidity, I prefer the cooler weather. I get so hot and stressed when it turns warm. When it's very cold I wrap up my throat, it's a vulnerable part of me that gets sore easily, and I wouldn't want it to turn into something nasty. The doctor once said that the hot weather doesn't help me... We have (in UK) lovely sun at the moment, but I don't stay out in it for long. I am fair skinned too, whereas I think darker complectioned people seem to cope better with sunsine and heat. Make sure you have your flu and pneumonia vaccinations this autumn, stay away from other peoples coughs and sneezes too. I hope this helps.

xx Shirley

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I actually do pretty good in cold weather --- we live in Minnesota. The humidity bothers me more than anything. I have 4 grandkids that play ice hockey and I do very well in the arenas. We do go south (Tucson AZ) for the winter but leave after the first of the year. Good luck to on your journey. Cherry-4

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We have both hot humid weather in summer and cold in winter. Both bother me. When I go out in cold weather, I wear a mask so I am not directly breathing in the cold. In summer, I spend very little time outdoors if the temp is over 85. Needless to say, this summer I was not out much as we had numerous days of temps 100+.
I would suspect that the weather elements bother different people in different ways. Good luck to you!

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In the deep south we never experience the really cold weather...but our Summers are attrocious---hot, humid and just not much for anyone with this disease to cope in . Without a/c and in my case central and a window unit in my bedroom ---I am sure I would have died. The air would have been too hard to bear. Even though I am on 5/5 ( that my supplier had convieniently rounded down ---against my Dr/'s orders because his machine is a maximum of 5, I do not know what the Winter holds. Sure hope it is better than Summer here. The cool air is easier to live with that the humid hot air. Oxygen is terrific but ...to be honest...I go without it for a few hours a day just to convince myself Ican still do it but....I should not do that and am always happy to put those Cannulas back on....In Summer it gets to 100+ here as well and winters can go to the twenties at night and up to the 50's by day....In the Summer...when I would have one of my gasping attacks I would simply move to the front of the window unit and breathe in the cold air a bit and I could breathe again.

Sure hope something will help those gasping attacks in Winter too...maybe sticking my head outside will help....

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In Upstate part of SC, the cold and if a dry
air comes thru, people with lung problems
cough and have a harder time. Watch the
asthma people. They have more attacks in
cold with humidity under 30%.
cold and very dry air like Denver-Boulder
Area of CO bothers me, even before IPF.
Humid and not do cold weather with not too
Much wind is good at the SC coast. (as
Long as u have AC inside home).
I run AC all year at bedtime with windows
Closed to outside pollutants. I set temp at
65-68 for sleeping.

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Annice , I run my a/c at night even in wind\ter as well...I can use a downs comforter and do pretty well with the tempt at 68 .

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I live in the same state as chevelle and the heat and humidity can be smothering. While traveling in the car I like the a/c blowing in my face. Sometimes when I have been outside and come into the house, I put my face in the freezer, so I would say cooler whether is my preference.

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And I thought I was the only one standing
With the refrig door open! LOL

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Thanks to everyone for your comments and help. Annice, I love the sense of humor.
David

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Live in western Oregon. Our heat I have trouble in. It was 97º Friday and I saw the impact on my oximeter. But the cooler weather is great for my tolerance. Our extremes are not really that extreme, but I would think sub freezing weather might be as hard as hot humid weather. Only DXed this spring and not on O2 yet, so this winter will tell me more. Plan to be in some colder areas of eastern Oregon, so will assess my tolerance. Going to so miss hiking where I used to hike with such ease. No longer possible. :( Damn!

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Okay, now I don't feel so weird, I have done the refrigerator thing to and also cold showers and going to the grocery store, hell, that is a freeze feast for me. Open the doors in frozen food section is a total thrill for me!!!!!!! LOL. I am already in my own personal summer but to think that the disease may also play a part. I am going to be the human combustion and all people will find of me is ashes. Good Grief.

Donna, Tallahassee, Fl.

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Oh I def do the refrigerator thing too.... we live in the FL panhandle now but I've lived in three different weather zones since being diagnosed. Chicago, where it can get very cold was actually the hardest on me. I do like cooler weather but the colder weather (especially sub-zero) was awful. Then we moved to TN where it didn't get quite as cold but still cold and dry enough on days to know it bothered my breathing quite a bit. I actually breathe the easiest here on FL except on very hot and humid days. I find the barometric pressure effects my breathing as well. Since it doesn't get bitterly cold yet still gets cool in the winter, last year was good. I'm pretty advanced now and am in a wheelchair but I still find that as long as the temp doesn't change too drastically and too fast, I can adapt. We moved here to be by my grandson, etc, for my time left and it is so worth it. Just be careful around sick people, especially in the winter months, exercise as you can and really try to eat right. The stronger you can build your body up, the easier it will be to stand up to the elements and germs - despite a compromised immune system. Enjoy your family - they're what's important. ((Hugs))

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I am so hoping that Bailey and deco are right about being in the SOuth for the winter. I know it was tough during the summer here ( my first since being Diagnosed) but the window a/c was a savior for me...but the Winter is a mystery for me...but I will just keep cool as best I can without freezing and hope for the best. Our Winter in South Alabama last year was not too bad and I hope it will be the same again this year.

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Well, guys and gals!!! I live in Louisiana and woooweeeee it has been hot. Today was like an Autumn day. A lot drier than it has been and it was easier to breathe. I find that while I am doing things around the house etc. if I get way out of breath I use these little tiny hand held fans and turn it on and put it right up to my face and breathe in the air. It helps me so much. And it helps me to not panic too. I find when it is very hard to get my breath going and it takes a while, it really gets to me. Sooo, I have these little fans all around the house. :)
BLESSINGS ALWAYS, JACKIE :)

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summer used to be my favorite time of year . i'd be like a lizard on a rock . then along came ipf .now if the temp. would stay between 45&80,
i would just be in hog heaven . my son gave me this wonderful little fan . it has 3 speeds & adjusts to set on a flat surface. along with my oximeter ,it goes every where i go . easy breathing everyone

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I just moved from Kalamazoo, Michigan, to Kansas City partly because the cold Michigan winter made breathing so difficult. When I went outside the extreme cold air -- below freezing continuously -- constricted my bronchial airways. And of course, the winter is soooo long that it was impossible just to stay inside. I was already at end stage IPF caused by hypersensitivity pnuemonitis with pulmonary arterial hypertension, so for quality of life we came to KC. It turned out to be a trade off with the extreme heat here. We'll see how the winter goes.

But I totally agree with the cold weather strategies. Cover you mouth and go slow. If you drive, hope you have a remote start so you are not sitting in a freezing car while your O2 sats recover from the exertion.

I totally get why you want to be near family. Me too.

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John, I appreciate your post. Seems one has to choose carefully the climate of his environment. Not too cold is just as important as not too hot. Great advice. Since I have not gone through a harsh Winter with this mess I will remember covering my head...while I do not have a garage or a remote starter for my car I will ( on the coldest days ) walk very slowly to it when I just have to get out. Unfortunately, my nearest relative is 5 hours away...my son ...and he is so wrapped up in his climbing that career ladder that he has little time to think about battles I may be fighting here..so i am pretty much on my own unless I move closer to him and then my son can identify with what I have to live with. I am happy you moved and hope the Winter will be kind to you.

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I must say that I am very glad my son settled in the FL panhandle and NOT Minnesota (nothing against MN). It didn't take a lot of arm twisting to get me down here and we do have seasons, with the hot days in summer being the hardest on me but even at that, it's not for very long. The other three are wonderful. : ) We originally thought TN was going to be best but the winters still got a bit too cold and dry. Plus the draw of my grandson was a big one.

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Chevelle1950,
My son was the same, too busy to think about my problems, even when I moved into the barn(remodelled for me). I got him to go to Boston Brigham & Womens Hospital and when the Dr told him I was a very sick man, it hit him. He told me on the way back to ME, that he new my situation and really didn't know to much about IPF. He said when I told him things, it didn't hit home, but when the Dr said I was at an advanced stage and a very sick man, it hit him.
If you can your son to go to your Dr appt, maybe that wil help. Good luck & God Bless

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