How much should a 28 months old weight?

Just wondering how much are your 2 yrs plus weighing, dont know if i should be concerned or not my former 28 weeker twins are now 28 months and only weighing 25 pds I have a full term 17 months old girl that weights 22 pds she is catching to the boys so quickly.

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At 28 months the "average" (please believe I use that term VERY loosely) weighs about 31 pounds. This is right at about the 50th percentile. This does not take into consideration the toddler's heights, his parents satures, or issues such as prematurity. "Normal" is a very wide range and it sounds like your son is doing fine.

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I can tell you that our full term son is 30 months old and weighs 26 lbs and is perfectly healthy - he's just a skinny little man! He's active, runs around all over the place and eats well. I think it'll vary child by child and as long as they're healthy, the weight doesn't matter.

Our daughter Kylie was born at 23 weeks and is around 18/14 months old now and only weighs 14 lbs - but she's been in and out of the hospital so much, she hasn't had a chance to gain weight.

Our neighbor's son is right around 14 months old and weighs 36 lbs! He's a monster - You'll probably get a mix of answers from everyone.

From my side, if your twins are 25 lbs, I'd say they're doing just fine!

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I still go by the adjusted age curve with Andrew, even though he's now 30 months actual/26 months adjusted. The curves are closer now, but it's the adjusted one that tells you more, including things it will allow you to do, like predict future height once they hit 2.

Andrew weighed 28 lbs. 13 oz at 28 months actual/24 months adjusted which was around the 60th percentile for a 24-month-old, and on a growth calculator right now, it looks like 28 1/2 lbs. is the 50th percentile for a 25-month-old, roughly their adjusted age...they could be 25 1/2 months I guess, but the difference isn't much at this age. When I plugged your boys' weight into the chart for 25 months, it said they were between the 10th and 25th percentile. For actual age, they are between the 5th and 10th percentile. They are on the small side, but not alarmingly small at all, especially for adjusted age.

Your daughter is at an age where she is still gaining fast. But give her a year. When she's their age, she will gain much more slowly, probably. On the charts, it appears your daughter is somewhere between the 25th and 50th percentile.

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Hello! I am a mom of twin boys that were born at 29 weeks and 2 days. They were 2lbs. 8 oz and 2lbs 14 oz. They will be 3 in March and weigh 28 lbs and 25 lbs. They are still little peanuts but are growing just fine.

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Mine are 27 months old actual/24 adj. and just barely tip the scales at 25 pounds and 23 pounds...I think they're both still a few ounces less than this. They too are peanuts. I don't think there's a weight a child of any age is "supposed" to weight. Being on the charts at 50th percentile simply means that child weighs more than 50% percent of children of his age. I read an interesting article recently about our culture's view that only healthy children are 50th percentile or above...this is a HUGE misconception since many of the children in the U.S. are overweight...you don't necessarily want your child to weigh more than 50% of other children. I read in Dr. Sears Baby Book that toddlers should no longer possess that chubby, baby-fat look either. A typical toddler body should now be leaned out. Obviously, with all children--especially our preemies--it is important to make sure they are growing consistently...by age 2, though, I really think if your child has grown fine up to this point and is a good eater, then there's not much to worry about. The at risk two year olds are those who are still dealing with reflux, oral aversion, constant throwing up.

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My 30 month old 25 weeker weighs 24 pounds

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Havengirlsmama, you brought up a great point...there is a wide range of average and a baby weighing at the 75th, say, is no better or worse, in a doctor's mind, I am sure, than one weighing at the 25th. They are both equally average. They do worry when baby gets above the 95th and below the 5th. But they also worry before those extremes if the baby isn't keeping up with their own curve, or if their BMI isn't close to average. They don't want the babies to be too chubby or skinny.

Andrew's pediatric nutritionist was a little alarmed that his weight had fallen some in comparison to his height, which was gaining, at his 18 month adjusted NICU follow-up, the last time we saw her. At the time, his height had climbed to the 49th percentile for adjusted age, and his weight was at around the 38th percentile--honestly, not much of a difference at all, but she was concerned because his BMI was falling. His weight had been above his height in the past, and then equal to it. So it was falling on his curve. She told us it was fine to keep him on toddler formula at the time until 2 adjusted and whole milk until 3 adjusted...she wanted that. She told us to fatten up his diet with fatter meats, butter, milkshakes, everything. It was strange because he was in the 38th percentile, and not a whole lot above in height. But she was a little worried.

He evened out again by 24 months adjusted... 60th/60th...then he experienced a tremendous growth spurt for the age, and was up to the 71st a month later in height, and had tonsil surgery and lost a pound and a half. He's gained all that back now but is just where he was 6 weeks ago now, but I am sure the rest of the weight growth he missed out on will come soon and he'll be closer again. He's 75th in height now and around the 60th for adjusted age, in weight, I believe. So he's close. His fullterm play date friend born a day after Andrew was due is in the 90th for height and the 50th for weight, so he has a bigger extreme. I think if he'd go any below that percentile for weight, while the height is still up there, they'd worry some but the doctor wasn't worried at all, because its been his pattern all along. And he wasn't a preemie.

You're right about babies losing their fat...Andrew lost his baby looks so early. A toddler tummy, however, is normal, because toddlers at this age are supposed to not be able to have the muscles to hold in their middle the way adults can. It's supposed to stick out some. Andrew lost a lot of that tummy after his surgery. My sister's youngest boy was SO hefty as a toddler. He was built like a linebacker. Then he hit the preschool years and slimmed down entirely. He's now on the thin side. I think the nutritionist was concerned that if Andrew's curve was already thinning some, at 18 months adjusted, that he was going to get really thin at 3. She asked questions about his birth mom and if she had slimmed out at that age, and indeed she had. She was a 9-pound, very chubby baby but was tiny by age 5...only wears a size 0 today and is barely 5 feet tall. But her height all along was in the 10th percentile, so that just stayed the same. What's interesting to us is his birth mom and birth father both are at or below the 10th percentile in height, yet Andrew's zipped up to the 75th. We don't understand it, but we'll take it! Of course, genetics might have him stop growing early...we just don't know.

I looked up your girls in my book chart, and using 24 months adjusted as their age, it looks like one is in the 25th and the other in the 10th for weight. Neither weight is worrisome at all. Girls tend to weigh a pound less than boys at this age at the lower percentiles of the growth chart, and 2 pounds less at the higher percentiles. They can rearface longer in their carseats and all that...that's one negative about Andrew's rapid growth. He'll outgrow rearfacing in his carseat right at 3 adjusted, I think, but if he were a smaller girl, we could rearface him until 4 easily.

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Im in the same boat... My 4 year old (former 3 lb 13 oz 32 weeker) weighs 43 pounds and his 6 1/2 year old (former 4 lb 5 oz 33 weeker) sister weighs just 36 pounds. He outweighs her by a lot even though he is 2 1/2 years younger and was born earlier and smaller. Our DD has always been tiny though, at 24 months she was 20 lbs and at 36 months she was 24 lbs.

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My full term 32 month old weighed 30lbs even over the weekend.

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It's amazing how many people call my little granddaughter a "little peanut". She is the most precious, precocious peanut! She is almost 29 months (26 adjusted) and almost 18 pounds. She definitely has her individual growth curve, it's just not on any chart except hers. It's hard to believe she seems perfectly healthy. She no longer has reflux, throwing up or oral aversion. She eats, she talks in sentences, she runs, jumps, climbs, and wrestles with her 56 pound sister. I have had her for day care again this week and I am gaining weight eating with her (she was totally tube dependent and now I already almost forget how we prayed that some day she would eat!) I really hope she will soon start gaining, I would feel so much more comfortable if she had a little meat on her bones. They still give her formula thru her Mic-key button too. Her almost 5 month old cousin is already 16 pounds and it is going to be hard for our peanut to understand why she can't give her too small clothes to her little cousin any more. She has enjoyed seeing "her" clothes on the baby. It has been good for her to think she was bigger than somebody, that she is growing up.

Grandma has to keep the prayers going for her and for all the little ones and their families.

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Hello my daughter is 5 and only weighs 31 lbs.. Very slow weight gain. SHe was a preemie born at 26 wker weighed at 1 lb 2oz.
Was on a feeding tube but never was really gaining weight. .She is pettite and skinny just like her parents..

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