List of Vaccines In Development

Everyone,
Sorry I'm not better with the computer but here's an interesting site.
I hope it is helpful.
http://www.innovation.org/documents/phrmamedicinesindevelopmentcancer2012%2 0(3).pdf
Scroll down to Ovarian
If anyone is taking part in any of these trials please let me know
Sharon

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31 replies. Join the discussion

Great find.

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Thanks!

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Thank you.

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I opened site but did not see the vaccine trial I'm on, GOG 0255, OPT 821 with or without polyvalent KHL. Interesting. It's for ladies in their "first or second complete clinical remission" and unfortunately for me, my CA 125 just jumped to 76 so I may get booted out this month.

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Here's another that was not on the document...DPX-0907. I participated in the Phase I Safety Trial

http://www.imvaccine.com/DPX-0907.php

Another not listed is Roswell Parks NY-ESO-1 dendritic cell vaccine

http://medicine.buffalo.edu/news_and_events/research-news.host.html/content /shared/smbs/news/2012/03/dendritic-vaccine-rpci-119.detail.html

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Some vaccine studies not found under OvCA can be found under Solid Tumors list. These Solid tumor studies are open for OvCA and other cancers

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My Doctor is against participating in the stage 1 clinical trials.
Anyone with a doctor with a different viewpoint?

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I would love to find a good vaccine trial for my daughter with stage IV ovarian cancer. She is just finishing treatment for her first recurrence. If anybody has any experience with any vaccine trials, I would love to hear about them.

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I think doctors recommend stages of trials depending on your actual status. When I was first diagnoses stage IV, phase iii trials were recommended. Now that I have recurred and am not responded to treatment, stage I trials are recommended.

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What treatment you have had makes a difference in the kind of trial that's recommended. As far as I know, you have to be in remission to get into a vaccine trial.
You probably wouldn't want to do a phase 1 trial unless you had many chemos that no longer worked---people in phase 1's are often trying medicine that has never been tested in humans. Phase 3's might be the best, because you will get either standard of care, or standard plus new drug, but they can be hard to get into. Phase 2's might be good and have the newest drugs that have been determined to be safe, but they are still deciding what doses to use and if the drug actually works.

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Personally I think participating in clinical trials gives us our best chance at a cure. Bona fide cutting edge treatment if you ask me. I keep bouncing from phase 1 clinical trials (vaccine) and I am NED. Dx 4/11 3c. I understand people's trepidation but I guess I feel differently. Really, there is nothing to lose

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Just my opinion but I think there are pros and cons about participating in phase 1, 2, or 3 trials.
For me, I was after a particular drug. In phase 1 trials, you're guaranteed to get the investigational drug so that was where I wanted to be. Phase 2 or 3 trials could get one into just the standard chemo arm of the trial without the investigational drug. I didn't want to do that.
And because I was platinum resistant and most of the phase 2 or 3 trials required platinum sensitivity, I found that phase 1 trials are often less strict than phase 2 or 3 in their eligibility requirements.
Of course, I don't think I would want to be in the first trial on humans for a particular drug nor in the early stages of the trial where the dosage was very low. Luckily for me, I found a trial for the drug I wanted where the dose was already escalated and there were several trials with this drug that had already taken place or taking place at the same time.
So in my opinion, I wouldn't want to rule out phase 1 trials. I think everyone's needs may be different and we need to figure out what phase trial best meets our individual needs.

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Helpful thoughts Susie and Tough. I guess I think of the vaccines as different than phase one's and relatively easy, but vaccine trials can also be phase 1's

Susie, how did you learn about the drug to know that you wanted it, if it was just in a phase 1? Is it because it was in a category of drugs (like the PARP inhibitors, for example) that you already knew about?

Tough, I think I do agree why not go for it, but I also hope women don't go in with too high of expectations. . .

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I am in clinical trial GOG 0255 and have received two shots thus far. Would like to hear from others in this same study and their opinions.

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I'm wondering how to decide which trial to persue. There are so many, many choices out there. How do we know which molecules we have, which markers, etc. Most of my pathology was a long time ago, before alot of these markers, peptides, proteins, etc., etc. were really being looked at. Now there are so many different ways to go. Any suggestions on how to find out more about our individual cancers?

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3Bean
Yes, you're right. I was specifically looking for a PARP inhibitor because of my BRCA+ status. It was recommended for me by several oncologists and I decided that's what I wanted. And as you know, generally the only way to get the drug was in a clinical trial.

boothbayharbourgirl
Just my opinion but I think the best place to start is with your onc who knows you and how your responded to previous treatments, etc. I then went for a second and third opinion. And then of course, there is lots to read online.

I've heard that some of the cancer centers now have a specialty position where an experienced oncology nurse assists cancer patients in finding trails. I don't know if the service is available to the center's patients only or if it's available more widely.

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I pursued all of the trials I participated in by myself. My oncologist only lets me have an appointment every 3 months anyway. Although she is always supportive with whatever I pursue the decision and direction are up to me. She prefers a "surveillance" approach which was frustrating initially but really, we have all learned we need to be our own most proactive advocate. I've taken research on as my new job, too bad the other (paid) full time job gets in the way!

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I agree with Toughasnails in that participating in clinical trials gives us our best chance for a cure for us now and our Teal sisters to follow. I am in the Phase I trial IGFBP-2 for advanced OC (I am stage 3C) at the U of Wash, Tumor Vaccine Group. I was estatic to be accepted. Prior to researching trials, I asked my oncologist about clinical trials for me & he said "not too many promising right now". So I ventured out on my own. At my check-up last month, my CA-125 was steady at 3 for 15 months & now he wants to 'follow me more closely with extra tests, etc." so that his group of 7 drs. can be better informed when these vaccines are available to their patients. Not happy about the extra CT's & blood tests, but I am going along for now.
I received a beautiful letter from the head doctor of the Tumor Vaccine Group thanking me for participating in Phase I. Makes me feel like a 'pioneer'.

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All you ladies are so lucky to be able to search your trials. Canada does little in the way of offering any help of personalized treatments, and only offer the "standard of care". So frustrating.

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I think the trials don't require any particular citizenship, though of course traveling can be hard, and there are expenses with trials.

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