fluid on lungs

I have fluid half way up my right lung left from my debulking surgery 4 weeks ago. I go in tomorrow to have a chest and abdominal ports put in. They said they may need to drain the fluid before the surgery. They said they use a needle that they stick into your back to do this. Have any one of you had this done and does it hurt terribly bad? I am really nervous.

Thanks,
Jenene

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No, it doesn't hurt. They will numb an area on your back and then insert the drain. I had it done twice and the needle didn't hurt at all. As the fluid drains and the lung re-expands, it does make you cough and it feels strange -- I thought it felt like taking a deep breath when the temperature is way below zero. That's uncomfortable but passes quickly. Good luck with it! The good thing is you can breathe much more easily immediately after the procedure.

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Borderline3: Thank you so much for sharing your experience with me. It makes me feel a little better and not so scared. My procedure is tomorrow.

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Yes. I had this done prior to my debulking surgery due to fluid around my lung. They numb the area so well that you truly do not feel a thing. Really. I didn't feel it at all. You will be amazed at how much fluid drains into the container. Yuck. But you will feel SO much better when the pressure is relieved. You'll be able to breathe again. Good luck!

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I also had this done a couple of weeks after my debulking surgery. I had massive surgical complications and was on a ventilator in ICU. I could not wean from the ventilator until the fluid was drain from both lungs. Actually the fluid is in the pleural cavities and not really in the lungs. They did one lung one day and the other the next day because they didn't want to risk collapsing both lungs at the same time. As the others have said, there's reallu no pain. My young adult children still talk about how "gross" it was seeing all the fluid drain but it was certainly wonderful to get off a ventilator. This was over three years ago. Best wishes, Janet

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Hopefully your pleural effusion will resolve on its on. It did not for me.

The thoracentesis does not hurt terribly, but I did feel it. They kept warning me about a "little stick" every time they injected the numbing agent, and then said nothing when they injected the draining tube. It startled me so much that I let out a naughty work, and spent the next few minutes chastising the radiologist for not giving me more warning.

You will cough a lot which serves to open your lungs up, and your back will be a tiny bit sore when you lean against the seat on the drive home, but you will be amazed at how much better your breathing is. I wish I had had mine done sooner.

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Nenedale, how did it go? I hope it went okay, and that you're breathing better.

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Borderline3,
Well as it turns out I didn't need to be fearful after all because they drained the fluid while I was put to sleep during the port surgery. Boy can I breath a lot better now! They drained a liter and a half from my lung. My port sites are very sore though but I know I will be glad to have the IV port so they do not have to poke me over and over again to find a vein. I am a two time breast cancer survivor and have had the IV port before however the IP port is new and really sore. I start chemo on the 15th.
Jenene

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I'm glad it feels better! That was nice, to have it done while you were asleep!

Good luck with the chemo. You're a real veteran -- I hope it all goes smoothly for you!

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I had this procedure done to both lungs....I breathed so much better afterwards. Im due to go back in for another one real soon. I also need a paracentensis. Hopefully, by now you're breathing easily,too. Nanci

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I had the fluid drawn off my lungs twice. It has not came back after going on chemo. It dried it all up. Finished with chemo at the end of October and I'm feeling great.

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