Can you still be an organ doner?

Was just wondering if you can still donate your organs once you've had cancer?
Sandy

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I don't think so...I tried to enter a bone marrow registry and was rejected.

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Thank you for the quick response
Sandy

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Can't give blood anymore either.

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I asked my oncologist the question of organ donation and he said corneas, so you are right kennebec.

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I was thinking once you've been diagnosed with cancer they'd say no to everything.

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I would think that you could donate your body and organs to further ovarian cancer research. Ask your oncologist because they might know of something.

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Only corneas can be donated by people with cancer but bodies can be donated to local medical schools. I don't think that we designate for Ov CA research only…but maybe someone knows about this?

Found this:
"All people can be considered as being potential organ, tissue and eye donors after death has been declared. However, the presence of active cancer, active HIV, active infection (for example, sepsis) or Intravenous (IV) drug use would absolutely rule out donation. Patients who have Hepatitis C may still donate organs to a patient who also has Hepatitis C. The same is true for Hepatitis B — but this happens less frequently. Most cancer patients may donate corneas."
http://www.donatelifeny.org/about-donation/faq/#nul

Body donation:
http://www.ehow.com/about_4701679_cadaver-organ-donation.html

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I had called my local blood (Puget Sound Blood in Seattle) bank to donate blood and they said that they will accept blood donations from Ovarian Cancer as long as:
1. It has been over a year since you received chemo
2. You are still in remission
3. It has been over a year that you received any blood transfusions

It seems the only cancer they block from giving forever are blood related cancers because they are still not sure about those.

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My doctor made it clear that I cannot donate organ or blood. In fact, I think the blood bank that is willing to accept blood from ovarian cancer patient, in remission or not, is being incredibly irresponsible. When I used to donate blood, nobody asked for proof of my medical history. How do they check how long the patient has been in remission or even whether she is in remission and when/if she received any blood transfusions. Is there a clear demarcation point between remission and recurrence? So, we say today exactly at noon, recurrence started? A patient who still thought she was in remission may have already started recurrence without realizing it.

If one of my kids need blood transfusion, and the blood came from a blood bank that relies on the donor's self reported remission from cancer, I would be truly alarmed.

I think we should simply refrain from donating anything, lest we inadvertently transfer our cancer to any unsuspecting patient.

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I donated my tumor to medical science. They asked me to sign a release to study my tumor prior to my de-bulking surgery.

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evertheoptimist.. excellent point! Makes you think, doesnt it! My son had to receive blood transfusions after car crash... I hadnt thought of "cancer" but did think of HIV and HepC... stuff like that. Blood banks dont mark them "men's blood" woman's blood" nor do they check for cancer from what I have heard...
Love,Kim

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I asked the blood bank about recurrance. I told them there is a period of time when OVCA does not show on a scan and may not show on a test and you may in fact have cancer activity. She assured me that they believe you cannot give your cancer to someone else that way. The blood bank does accept most people who have had cancer (but no blood cancers) as long as they are off chemo for one year and in remission to the best of their knowledge.

If you think about it, there are people donating everyday who already have cancer started up in their body and are not aware of it yet. An OVCA person who is diagnosed stage III or IV probably was sick for several years before diagnosis and could have been donating the whole time.

IF anyone contacts another blood bank who has different criteria I sure would be interested in hearing about it.

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My husband was told he could not donate blood and he is a colon cancer survivor. Before the cancer he donated regularly through the Red Cross.

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Interesting ... maybe he was denied because it had not yet been one year. I can't remember.

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my doctor is a cancer survivor himself. He clearly indicated that nobody should take his blood, and I should not attempt to donate blood.

It's one thing if somebody had cancer started microscopically without him/her realizing it and donate blood. It's altogether another if the donor knows for sure that s/he may be having cancer activities and knowingly let unsuspecting patients be the recipient of her blood. I think it's highly irresponsible.

If there is a definitive, error proof evidence that cancer patients can donate blood while in remission, then that's fine. However, the fact that some doctors are saying no means the medical community does not have a consensus on this. Under the circumstance, let's not let our heroic sense misguide us and potentially do more harm then good.

As I mentioned above, I would be infuriated if one of my kids received blood transfusion from a cancer patient, in remission or not, who knowingly donated his/her blood..

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You might want to start here: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/information/donating-tissue-re search

Perhaps this agency would be able to assist too: http://www.livingbank.org/

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I would think that Puget Sound Blood bank had definitive proof that it was okay to donate blood. She even told me that Dr's don't believe that blood cancer can be transmitted via blood but they aren't 100% certain so they do bar Hodgkins and blood related cancers forever from donating blood. It's possible that guidelines have changed recently and this is now what they do. That is why I'd be interested in people in other cities calling the blood bank to see.

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I AM MORE THEN GRATEFUL TO THOSE GOOD PEOPLE WHO DONATE BLOOD- I CERTAINLY HAVE USED MY SHARE OF IT- AND IT MOST LIKELY HAD A LOT TO DO WITH ME STILL BEING HERE- HOWEVER I THINK I WOULD FEEL ILL AT EASE DONATING BLOOD
WERE THERE ANY CHANCE AT ALL THAT I MAY PASS ON ANY ILLNESS-KNOWING AS A RESULT SOME ONE WOULD HAVE TO ENDURE THE FEAR AND SUFFERING, LET ALONE THEIR FAIMILY- HAVING TO DEAL WITH IT AS WELL,-

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Thank you so much for all your feedback and help. I have always been a full organ donor on my license, so I guess I need to change that now. I had thought about that question before but the chemo brain set in, lol. I don't think I would be comfortable donating blood anymore though, it still seems like to much of a risk to others.
God Bless and restore us all to health
Sandy

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Here in aus, generally if you are cancer free for 5 years you can donate again- except for blood related cancer

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