J tube button placement

I already have a standard j tube and I am thinking about getting a button placed in it's place. My question is, since I had my j tube placed surgically, will they have to place the button in surgically also? I've heard of two different type of buttons, the bard and Mickey buttons. I'm not sure what the difference is or if one is better than the other for j tubes. If anyone on here had a button with for their j tube, can you tell me about your experiences? I'm seeing a surgeon on wenesday and I am nervous because of the switch. I am also talking to the surgeon about the gastric pacemaker to see if I am a canditate and get info as well. I'm very nervous so if anyone has advice please help!

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My husband has had a j-tube for 2 1/2 years and it was originally placed surgically. Two months ago he tried the Bard button type and it was put in through Interventional Radiology as an outpatient. Two days later we were back in IVR requesting his original catheter type back. In my husband's case they were trying the button because he has a lot of leakage they thought it my help eliminate the leaking. Instead it made it worse! Plus he found it uncomfortable.

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Thanks for the reply!

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My daughter had a J-tube surgically placed many years ago. For the last 10 years, she has used a button-type tube, and we couldn't be more pleased with it. Leakage for her has diminished, unintentional pulling-out of the tube has been eliminated, stoma comfort has improved dramatically. It is placed by interventional radiology every time it is changed, which for her is every 6 months. It does hurt to change it, but local freezing and advil are all she needs to handle the discomfort. She has used a Bard, an Entristar, and a Cook passport-20. We prefer the Cook passport-20 over the others, in particular because it has the most reliable anti-reflux valve of the ones we have tried. It is referred to as a mushroom, semi-rigid tip. This means that it retains its form/shape until stretched by the device used for placement and removal. The mushroom tip has small holes in it which allow matter to pass through, reducing the risk of intestinal blockage, and the tip is considerably smaller than a balloon, also reducing the risk of obstruction. Good luck with your inquiry into this type of tube. LindaRose

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Thanks for the info! I've never even heard of that type of button.

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I have had a peg tube for three years and I just had a mic-key button put in (didn't hurt much at all) and I love it. I had it done by the radiologist but the person that showed it to me replaces his own. Not sure I could do that.
I still have leakage but not as much. But it is much more comfortable without the tube attached.

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Thanks for the replies. It helps if you know what to expect!

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I have had a Jejunostomy Feeding Tube for over 10 years now and it has been changed annually. It was last changed in January of this year and has been problematical since. The leage of bile on the entry site has become just impossible. The fitting of a Stoma Bag on the entry site does not work because the bile just destroys the Barrier Ring and causes excessive burning of the skin. I have reached the point that the pain is just to much to bear and I cannot fit the Stoma Bag with the skin all blistered and very painful.

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We are having the same problem with leaking. My husband has had the j-tube for almost 3 years and never had a problem until 6 months ago. IVR has gone up 3 sizes in the tube and it still continues to leak. We are at a loss as to what to do now. The leakage happens whether he eats orally or uses the tube. It does seem to decrease when he doesn't use the tube feeding. But then that is defeating the purpose of the feeding tube! We call the PCP he refers us to the GI who refers us to the surgeon who refers us to Interventional Radiology who refers us back to the surgeon. We feel as if we are on a merry-go-round. Then out of the blue it completely stops leaking for about 3 weeks and then it will become clogged. (which we've never had that problem before either) Once we get the coke into the tube and break through the clog voila!! the leaking starts again.

Karen

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my mom has had a jejunostomy feeding tube for over a year. she has gone up in size but still notices a lot of leakage. is this tube feeding that is leaking? she has difficulty swallowing but has only recently been able to drink some boost nutritional supplements. she says when she drinks this, she notices that this will cause leaking from her j tube site. is this "normal"? also she says there is sometimes a hissing sound coming from the site. has anyone else experienced this?

thank you,
Phil

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Well, my husband had to have his j-tube removed and surgically placed in a new location on 11/11/10. The reason for his excessive leaking of stomach contents and bile was when IVR changed his j-tube in a routine change on 4/16/10 they went out of the established track and perforated his small bowel. After 5 visits to IVR and 2 surgeons the problem was finally discovered by the second surgeon. The perforation was pretty large and required a bowel resection. The surgeon placed the j-tube using a 12 FR and we had constant problems with clogging (but leaking stopped) because of the small size. On 12/22 IVR changed the 12 to a 14 and everything is working fine. No leakage!!! So luckily we found the cause and it was fixable.

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