using EZorb

My mom and I have been taking EZorb for one month. Mom says she has been so sleepy that she has cut back to one tablet in the morning and two at night. but the required amount for her to take according to her weight is 8 capsules a day. the orders say for people with fybromyalgia, which she has, is to only take calcium in the morning and again 30 minutes or an hour before bedtime to avoid the sleepiness. she still cannot fucntion beause she's so sleepy. What can be done differently so that she can benefit from the EZorb and not be sleepy.

She has severe RA, toes curled under and severe osteoporosis; she needs to take EZorb.

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I've been trying to find something definite that shows EZorb actually works. I'm not convinced yet - but I just started researching. I also saw something about Eniva Cell Read Minerals that think I'll look into...

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I have fibro and EZorb has worked wonder on me. I've been on it for almost 3 years. I had the same problem at the beginning. After exchanging several emails with the company I realized that most of us don't live a normal schedule as others do. Sometimes I went to bed around 9 sometimes 11 and got up at different hours as well. That made it hard to follow the EZorb directions for fibromyalgia patients. After about two months I found out what time to take EZorb and that it would work for me. First thing I did was I tried to stick to a fixed schedule: I got up at 7am and am in bed around 11pm. I took 4 around 7: 30 and 4 around 10pm. I struggled for about a week to stick to the schedule then everything else fell right into place. I quit my job as a nurse for about a year. After 4 months on EZorb I went back to work. I have only the best things to say about EZorb. Friends of mine who had suffered from this disease all had great results with this product. My recommendation is that your mom stick with it and find out the best way to use it.

Gloria

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Hi Gcoote,
Do you have Osteoporosis? and if so, have you had a DEXA done since you have been on EZorb?
If so, has Ezorb helped your bones?

Thank you,
April

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This is from Google.com. What type of Calcium EZorb is .

http://www.ezorbcalcium.com/html/information_for_medical_profes.html

I just bought from the health food store, "Calcium Asporotate".
It says in the site, that EZorb is Calcium Asporotate Anhydrous".
Does anyone have the bottle of Ezorb to say what it says on the bottle?

I'm going to search to find what is the differents from Asporotate.

Take Care,
April

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Hi April, yes I have osteoporosis. I had a scan years ago and was told I had severe osteoporosis. But I got so tired of fibro... at one point I wanted to give up my life. So I really didn't care for a broken bone or anything. Now that I'm back to normal, I'm thinking about getting a bone scan in Dec. All my friends are getting excellent results on their bone density numbers. I'm sure I'm good too.

Gloria

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Hi April, EZorb is calcium aspartate anhydrous. The site you quoted is a distributor. Here's the manufacturer's site: http://www.elixirindustry.com/ezorb/index.html.

Gloria

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Hi Gloria,

Thank you for the website for Ezorb.
I'm glad to hear your feeling so good taking Ezorb for your Fibro. I hope it works just as well for your Osteo.
Are you also taking D-3?

I do find when anyone is selling something, they can say what every they want about it to sell it.
It seems that Ezorb has been great for Fibro which my Son has, and also a good friend. I'll tell her about Ezorb.
Now I wonder if it does as good for Bones!

It did say the Key Longevity of the Okinawans was do to the Organic calcium in the water!
That is hard to believe. I just saw Dr. Oz on tv with the Okinawans, as that is true they do have Longevity,but its not from the Calcium in the water!

I'm going to check out Ezorb more to find out if anyone has had good results using it for Osteoporosis.

Thanks again,
April

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I been using Ezorb for three months. Next Friday I will have a bone density. I take to tablets in the morning two around 1:00 P.M and two before I go to bed. I do not get sleepee, but all the bodies are different. Till now I´m very please, I have severe osteoporosis. But I have faith with this natural medication. I do not take vitamy D with Ezorb. They advise me not to take it. I also take fosteum one every 12 hours. I m anxiuous to see the results of my bone density. I will let you know as son as I get the results.

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I was diagnosed of osteoporosis in May of 2004 but I didn't start EZorb until June of 2005. In May 2006 my bone density actually showed decline of about 1.3% in the hip and no change in L2-L4. I emailed the company and was told that I shouldn't compare results to 2004 since I'd been on EZorb for only half of the time and my numbers could be much worse in June 2005 than May 2004. With EZorb my numbers were catching up to make up the possible decline between 2004 and 2005. They told me I should see a big increase for next scan. This made sense to me.

They were right. In May 2008 I had another bone density scan and I'm so relieved. My hip increased 7.6% and my lumbar spine's up 9.4%. Years of struggle with my doctor and worry, and my investment finally paid off.

My doctor wanted me to go on Fosamax and threatened she would not be responsible if I would take EZorb instead of Fosamax, as if she would be held responsible if I were to take Fosamax and ended up with decline. Even after I had such great results she's still pushing for Fosamax. Hell no! I guess it's my bones, not hers.

FARO, your expectation seems a little high. Did you have your last bone scan right before you started EZorb? If there's a month apart you probably won't see much change - we are talking about 1 month out of 3 months.

Michelle M.

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As for Dr OZ, isn't he a surgeon? He's not a scientist. I doubt he has more knowledge than EZorb's scientists. Besides, he spent too much time with Oprah...seems more like a showbiz man than a doctor. Just my two cents.

Michelle M.

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I am very interested in the EZorb. I have osteo also and my dr. wanted me to take Actenol. I did not want to be on this med since I had heard bad side effects and they do yet know the long term effects. I also am hypothyroid so I have to watch what I take. I looked on the EZorb website, but could not ever really see if it contained soy or not. Does anyone out there who takes it know exactly what it contains. If someone would look on their bottle and let me know the ingredients (can't take soy) I would appreciate it. I want to get on something as soon as possible that will help my bones.

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Hi BJWL89, EZorb is calcium aspartate anhydrous. It's pure. I have celiac's disease. I asked them before if it contained gluten, wheat. They said EZorb doesn't contain anything else other than calcium aspartate anhydrous.

Michelle M.

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I am looking at my bottle of Ezorb and it says Calcium Aspartate Anhydrous 1120mg, Calcium (elemental) 146mg. Other ingredients rice powder, gelatin. It is the only Calcium that does not cause GI problems; I take other Calciums such as Calcium Orotate and Calcium Amino Acid Chelate in smaller daily doses.
Calcium Orotate research shows it is more absorbable. I posted info under Calcium Orotate, I consider Ezorb and CO comparable.

More on Calcium Orotate and Ezorb from GHC:
Calcium absorption takes place primarily in the small intestine, regardless of the source or type of the calcium. This is the area in which most nutrient absorption takes place. Both calcium orotate and aspartate are very good forms. Below is another post that offers some information on this subject:

Both of these forms of calcium are excellent and surpass almost all other forms of calcium on the market. Nieper was actually involved in the development of both the aspartate and the orotate carriers in the late 1950’s. Clinically, he actually used calcium orotate and sometimes Calcium 2-AEP for the treatment of osteoporosis and cartilage diseases. Obviously, he was very aware of the aspartate form and chose the orotate carrier instead. One reason for this is that orotate carriers have no affinity for the outer cell membrane and are instead delivered in to inside of a cell before they ionize and become available. Dr Neiper felt that “calcium orotate really performs clinical effects in various diseases connected with decalcification and injury of bones which can rapidly be improved by means of the application of calcium orotate by using this new concept of active mineral transport since we know, especially in studies run in Zurich, that all formation of bone, more or less, is controlled by cell membrane and that the microgranules of apatit have to be formed inside the osteoblast and then released through the cell membrane again.” Calcium aspartate is instead targeted more specifically to the inner layer of the outer membrane. As far as the percentages, Calcium aspartate yields approximately 13% elemental calcium and Calcium orotate yields between 10-11%; the 1.5 grams will yield about 150-165 mgs of calcium. Given the 90-95% absorption rate with this form, compared to 5-10% of calcium carbonate for instance, the low elemental percentage is more than compensated for in the higher absorption percentage, which is about 5-10% for Calcium Carbonate.

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Faro,
Are you still on the EZORB? Do you feel better and had your bone density improved. I need mine for bone density and arthritis pain. Only started taking it this week. Let me know if you are still on it and if you really think it is helping?

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