Teeth

I know that I have Osteoporisis (-2.5 at spine). I just had a dental check-up and my dentist tells me that I am losing bone from my teeth. I explained about the osteo and he said that there was no link.... but it seems to me there must be.

Does anyone have any info on this?

Lynne

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There's a link. Don't take any of the bisphosphonates (Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, etc). Do an alternate therapy.

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Lynney, I was diagnosed at age 50 with osteoporosis in high -3 range. I started Actonel 8/01 with no side effects. I'm now 62 and fracture free. I've had major dental work done without any problems; however my dentist does take precautions with antibacterial rinses prior and after procedures. My gums were receding and I had several front teeth bonded. My teeth are firm now without any additonal receding. Also, I've recently had thorough under gum cleaning and scaling. My dentist told me the gums and teeth are holding firm without any additional loss. When dentists notice receding gums, it is a good indication there may be bone loss. Your dentist can get information on dental care with osteoporosis from the ada (American Dental Association). Any bones in our body may be affected by bone loss. Now you need a plan to take care and maintain your teeth with the help and knowledge of a interested dentist. You may need to schedule an appointment to discuss treatment, care and bone loss. If your dentist doesn't show interest, please find another dentist.

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millie123, I realize many people cannot tolerate the meds .... and many people have side effects. But there are also many people, like myself that are doing well with the medication. We have to weigh the benefits and the risks. Sandi

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True, Sandi. However, there are meds other than bisphosphonates that may be safer for periodontal patients, particularly if they have had recurring infections and surgeries. True?

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Lynney, you don't say whether you are taking a bisphosphanate for your osteoporosis. If you are -- stop! There's definitely a link between jaw/tooth problems and bisphosphanates. But team, that's not what Lynney asked. She wants to know if there's a link between osteoporosis and tooth-bone loss, without throwing drugs into the mix. I haven't seen that topic discussed in these pages. The question seems to be: if you're losing bone mass and have therefore been diagnosed with osteoporosis, does that mean your teeth are among the bones that are losing mass? Does anyone know? Are teeth different from other bones in some way that would make them immune to osteoporosis?

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I would say 'Yes' if you have osteoporosis you are also going to have weaker teeth because aren't they made up of the same components? I could be very wrong here!

The reason I say this is I was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and as well as my bones being brittle my teeth were as well. I would be eating a biscuit and one of my teeth would just break off. By the time I was 17 my teeth looked awful even though I cared for them as best I could. It was decided that rather than just watch them gradually fall out I had the last ones removed and have since worn false teeth. It may sound a drastic action but it was the best thing I ever did.

I don't remember seeing much on this forum regarding teeth and osteoporosis unless it is linking to biphosphates. It would be interesting to know if osteoporosis affects teeth in the same way as bone?

Kind regards Loods

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To all,
Two years ago when I was diagnosed with severe osteoporosis my dentist also said there was no link between jaw bone loss and osteoporosis. He now admits he was wrong. On my last visit my teeth had significantly tightened and upon looking at new x-rays saw new bone growth. I'm almost at the end of 2 years on forteo and my teeth are stronger now than when I was in my thirties, when the teeth problem began.( after the birth of my last child) This is probably when my bone loss began period. So in thirty years I had so many scallings that I said no more and was totally prepared to have them yanked! What a pleasant surprise that last visit was.

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I have very sensitive sinuses that pick-up infections at the drop of a hat. While going through these attacks, my teeth started to abcess on the upper jaw. I asked my dentist if it could be because of the sinus problem? He said it was unequivocably unrelated, in a loud voice. Through good health programs my sinus condition is now under control but ready to rip if I don't take care of myself. However, the repeated sinus infections lowered my sinuses into my jaw bone and we are now planning an expensive procedure to correct that and do some implants since I lost the teeth just under the site where the sinuses were so heavy they 'descended.' My dental surgeion said, "Looks like you have had a lot of sinus trouble." So much for 'unrelated.'

I have had multiple procedures to save my upper teeth. Many thousands of dollars have been spent. In the midst of the project, every time the dentist worked on a tooth, it developed an abcess and I had to have root canal. One day I walked into the office and they were laughing about my predicament. I said, "I am going to stop this work for a while. I will call you when I am ready to resume."

I simply added 3mg of Boron to my multi-vitamin. After 3 months, my teeth were strong in my jaw and we resumed the work. The dentist was not willing to admit that it was the Boron that worked. My alternative doctor said he has seen much improvement in teeth and jaws with the addition of Boron. Boron simply holds your natural calcium in your body. I call it my little wonder. I am also convinced our teeth, that are bones, are involved in the osteo process. Why would not they be?

Hang in there, Lynne. We all discover things together.

juliemarie

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millie123, until there is a cure for bone loss, we must do what we feel is right for us. There isn't any one right way. I support community members choices whether those choices are meds or not. The main thing is to remain fracture free or heal from a fracture and resume a good quality of life. Sandi

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I also believe that osteo. & teeth are related. In hindsight, I started having trouble with my teeth & gums & I believe that's when the osteo. was starting. That would have been a good time to have labwork done for Vitamin D levels, calcium, etc. Also, a DEXA or other test for bond density. That might have prevented some bone & tooth loss over the last few years when I found out I had osteo. None of my doctors even thought about testing for Vitamin D, until I went to an Integrative Doctor (Medical + Alternative). I am hoping to stop the loss.

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Lynne:

I have the same problem and figured that osteoporosis was the reason and my periodontist also said that it had nothing to do with osteoporosis. I'm still not convinced!

Mimi

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Lynney,
You certainly bring up an interesting topic. I have had a lot of dental work over the last 10 years or so. Peridontal work, 2 implants, root canals and crowns. The implants were due to loosing teeth because the bone under the gum line was absorbed away. Pretty sure that is what the dentist said. I presently have 2 more teeth that this is happening to also. One tooth actually had a hole break through. I had the dentist put a filling in it and so far it has been sturdy like that for a couple of years. I have spent so much money on what appears to be a losing battle. I have been treated in the past with boniva, fosamax and reclast. I am now looking into natural choices.

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Irish59, I'm surprised you went through dental implants. Was the dentist aware at the time that you had bone loss?

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sdivas,
Yes, I always give a list of my medications/symptoms to all docs. I also had a maxillectomy when I was 27 years old to correct an overbite (along with braces) My teeth were pretty straight but my mouth was too small for my jaw I quess. Two upper teeth were removed at that time and my jaw was broken and partially removed. My jaws were then wired together for 8 weeks to heal. No over bite after that but I think the trauma of the surgery might have something to do with my dental problems now at 59. I also have a bit of TMJ problems. I have already lost one eye tooth and the other one will probably be lost at anytime. None of my peridontal or regular dentists ever seemed concerned. Of course I did not know about my bone loss when I was 27. My Gyn doc had me ask my regular dentist if I might possible have ONJ, but my dentist didn't seem to know what that was. I am also a vocalist and sing in church, weddings etc, so I have done everything I can to save my teeth.

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Thanks for all your replies. No, I'm not taking any meds. My consultant here in the UK thought that bisphosphonates were too risky for long-term use (I am 52). I take supplements (including 2000iu of Vitamin D now) and also boron, which was mentioned above. I was, to be honest, quite surprised my dentist thought there was no link with osteoporosis, as commonsense seems to suggest we would lose bone from our teeth too. He says 'we' need to be careful, have regular dental hygienist treatments (cleaning, polishing etc) to ensure good gum condition.

Since I posted this question, I have read more on-line which suggests there is a link. In fact some experts think that dentists should be on the look-out for bone-loss as it would be a way of detecting osteoporosis.

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Lnney,
I read the same thing! They are now saying, whoever they are, that bone loss in the mouth may be the first sign of osteoporosis and dentists should be made aware of this and in turn inform their patients.

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A couple years ago my dental hygienist told me that they have been the first to detect osteoporosis in some patients through the routine xrays. There must be a connection.

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I have been on Evista for 11 months. I just had a canine tooth pulled because it had reabsorption ( started destroying itself below the gum line). The specialist pulled it, and added "bone" in the jaw hoping that it would attach and make the jaw stronger before putting in an implant. After about 4 months, some of it took, but not as much as he had hoped. He is still talking about trying to do the implant.
I definitely think that there is a connection between the teeth and the osteo.

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I was somwhat taken aback today when, saying I need an extraction, the dentist also said that Forsteo is a biphosphate (which I didn't know!!). I said I understood (from this forum) that an extraction when taking biphosphates could be risky as jaw damage, lack of healing and infections could result, whereupon he said they'd have to notify my doctor and the extraction would have to be done in hospital.

Has anyone having Forsteo injections had an extraction, and if so what was the result?

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Yeah, I also had reabsorption of a tooth and the dentist didn't know what could cause it. I suggested Osteo as well and got the same "no connection".

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