Prescription Vitamin D

Hello, I am 41 years old and recently found out from a recent blood test that I have a very low level (5) of vitamin D in my blood. Doctor said she would call in a prescription for vitamin D that I would take over 8 weeks and repeat a blood test. I have yet to receive the prescription because doctor's order never reached the drug store and it's been two weeks of me trying to reach her to tell her to call it it again. Can I take vitamin D over the counter instead? And what would be the dosage?

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I am not a doctor, but my vitamin D was low also, despite my taking 2,000 units a day. So my doctor wrote out that I should take 5,000 units per day. So I take more Carlson drops. I take them with my calcium magnesium pills. And sometimes I take them with my strontium pills. Vitamin D helps absorption of Calcium from the intestines into the bloodstream.
Just take more vitamin D. Why wait for a prescription? Or sit in the sun for 10 or 15 minutes if you are in a warm climate.

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Hello You don't need a prescription. Go to the Drug Store and bye them, or walmart I bye spring Valley only because they are Gulton free I doubt if you have Sprue Disease. There is better one. Get the ones that says calcium with D read on the bottle u may have to bey exter D. I have to take 3 000 of D a day

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Thank you both. I will definitely try taking high dosage of Vitamin D myself. And just to make you guys know, I don't suffer from any physical ailments or other deficiencies.....also wasn't diagnosed with osteoporosis either. Just was worried about having such a very low vitamin D deficiency. Thank you both for your advice.

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Hi Nitenurse4hire, I also have low vitamin D of 4. I take 50, 000 units per week by perscription. It's actually cheaper too. (at least it is for me). You may not have osteo yet, but low vit D is a bad sign of what maybe to come. Best to you.

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You need a balance, you should never take just one thing as All work together.....
Our nutritionist showed us what she believed to be the best calcium on the market, derived from Algae or plant derived. See link for Bone Strength below, if you scroll down you will find the contents:
http://www.vitacost.com/New-Chapter-Bone-Strength-Take-Care-Special-Value-B onus-20-More-FREE

I just had a surprise the other day even though I run 3-5 miles 3 times a week, take 4,000 IU of Vitamin D3 and eat nothing but fat free or low fat foods.....my main artery to my heart was 95% blocked. Then came the calcium report, then came the the NIH report that said that the majority of plaque is made up of calcium.

Vit K to put calcium were it is supposed to go and Vit D3 2,000-4,000 IU will get you more than you need.......I clogged up my arteries in just 8 years because I just took the D3 and so the calcium stayed in my blood and went into my artery walls instead of my bones.......

********************************************************************
Discussion: In this pooled analysis of around 12 000 participants from 11 randomized controlled trials, calcium supplements were associated with about a 30% increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction and smaller, non-significant, increases in the risk of stroke and mortality.

(Scroll Down to Discussion)
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/341/jul29_1/c3691
Note: Logic says it is not just the supplements that you must consider but your total intake from all sources especially milk

From the National Institute of Health:
http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/mar2007/nhlbi-26.htm

Increased Blood Calcium and Vitamin D
http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/increased-blood-calcium-and-vitam in-d.html

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2010/05/12/2897105.htm?topic

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1 - inbox/12d6879d14506649

Who Will Tell the People? It Isn't Cholesterol
http://www.lewrockwell.com/sardi/sardi69.html

Vitamin K
By FAR THE MOST INFORMATIVE INTERVIEW I HAVE EVER LISTENED TO ….A MUST LISTEN (Set aside about an hour to listen to this interview):
Go here to listen to an interview of Dr. Vermeer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTm95J8SNGo&feature=&p=76C8A070A02D09EA&inde

http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james59.htm

http://www.healthyfellow.com/138/vitamin-K-and-heart-disease/

http://www.realage.com/tips/joint-health-vitamin-k-benefits?eid=1098921008& memberid=5263319

IP6 Info.

http://empiricalnutrition.com/?page_id=131

http://www.puritan.com/inositol-566/ip-6-inositol-hexaphosphate-005745?NewP age=1

Resveratrol Info.

http://shop.healthychoicenaturals.com/Resveratrol-500mg-Capsules-p/resv.htm ?source=nextag&utm_source=nextag&utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign=RESV#pricegrid

CBS News presentation

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4752354n

Plaque Removal

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/increased-blood-calcium-and-vitam in-d.html

http://www.trackyourplaque.com/

Hope this info helps and pls pass on to help other...Phil

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Nitenurse - my D levels were low too. The doctor first put me on OTC at about 4000 units/day. That still didn't get my levels up, so he prescribed a weekly pill of 50,000 units for 8 weeks (which sounds like what you were prescribed). Then after that, I'm back on 4000-6000 units/day. The doctor explained that your body needs to have a certain baseline level of D, which then each day you draw from & replenish. I assume if he prescribed that, then you have a return appointment as a follow-up. You can try taking increased daily amounts OTC if you don't want to hassle with the doctor/pharmacy, but be sure to let the doctor know at your next follow up just what you're doing.

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and, no, you don't 'need' a prescription for D, but to get the 50,000 units per week, that's a lot of OTC pills each day, instead of one manageable time release per week! If you go the OTC route, don't take the 50,000 units for more than 8 weeks. You drop back to the 2,000-4,000 range at that point to maintain.

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You can buy D3 gelcaps in 5,000 IU units at Walgreen's. Be sure to take magnesium and a good multi-vitamin mineral supplement, too. The general prescription by docs in 50,000 IUs per week. Just divide it up and come close. I'd do it daily at about 10,000 units and skip 2 days if I were you. After 8 weeks, re-test both D2 and D3 levels. That is a huge deficiency you have.

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Over the counter
Vitamin D3 Is More Potent Than Vitamin D2 in Humans.
As D2 ERGOCALCIFEROL is patented it's licensed so the only form on prescription. Hence you do better buying over the counter if you ensure it says D3 or CHOLECALCIFEROL.

Vitamin D quadruples your ability to absorb calcium from food or supplements so it's a good idea to take MAGNESIUM supplements with your meals while you are taking vitamin D. This counterbalances the extra calcium you will be absorbing. You may also find you now (because of improved absorption) require less supplemental calcium, ideally limit supplemental calcium to 600mg/d and make up the rest of the RDA amount by checking your food sources for calcium.

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I support what Phil suggests and also suggest you include Vitamin K2, about 1000 mcg, available from the Life Extension Foundation or NSI Super K2 Complex from Vitacost.

Vitamin K2 is very important to getting calcium to the right place and building high quality, strong bones. Low levels of Vitamin K2 can give you calcified arteries and soft tissues. Taking more Vitamin D increases the Vitamin K2 requirements of the body.

I was surprised to read recently that the way researchers give rabbits a human sized case of heart disease is by giving them very high doses of Vitamin D and extra cholesterol. All mammals increase the production of soft tissue calcium handling proteins under high levels of Vitamin D but these need to be carboxylated by Vitamin K2. Without the K2 and carboxylation, the proteins don't work well and calcium gets into arteries and provides the heart disease researchers wanted to study.

This is OK for rabbits, but not great for humans.

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Hello,

I too found out in 12/09 that my Vitamin D level was a 5 and my doctor prescribed a 50,000 unit pill once a week for 12 weeks which I took. After the 12 weeks, I continuned to take over the last year at levels of 10,000 to 15,000 units a day or every other day.
I just received my labs back today and my level has risen to 74 ng/mL and the report indicated the soures are endogenous and exogenous.
Hope this helps - it worked for me.

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If your Vitamin D level is that low, there's a reason for it. First, eliminate the possibility of hyperparathyroidism.
Use of mega-doses of Vitamin D is dangerous if you have PHPT. Nor, if that condition exists, will ANY amount
of Vitamin D or calcium taken 'save' or 'protect' your bones. And while it won't help your bones, it will injure
your health in other respects. Its a double whammy. The excess PTH hormone
continuously strips your bones of calcium (regardless of phosphonate use) and loads up your blood with
excess amounts of calcium, which then precipitates out into other tissues - kidneys,
heart, joints, etc. - and creates havoc. (As it sounds like one of the folks replying to this question
found out when confronted with plaque/blockage.) Good article out there from awhile back called "Death by
Calcium" a few years back, from an institute in Palo Alto . There's a great section at parathyroid.com
on how Vitamin D actually works and the significance of having unexplained low levels. Before taking advice
such as that frequently offered by TH on this site, please be careful. Vitamin D has a specific purpose and its
certainly important in bone health. But low Vitamin D can, dependent on circumstances, be a body-induced
protective measure to avoid raising blood calcium levels. Gobbling mega-doses of Vitamin D as supplement -
in those situations - is dangerous and counterproductive.

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Hi Ted, I was wondering if you could look at this link and tell me if this 50,000 IUs of D3 is actually D3 from BioTech? I thought you mentioned that the higher doses where always in the D2 form, and wanted to verify this manufacturer and product. I believe they also have the 100,000 IUs of D3 as well, but not sure. https://secure.bio-tech-pharm.com/detail.aspx?product_id=20&cat_id=2&subcat _id=0

TIA

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That is the form that Dr Cannell The Vitamin D council links to.
You may find exactly the same product online at Amazon or other suppliers cheaper depending on shipping cost.
There are also suppliers selling Biotech products under their own brandname.
Vitalady sell not only BIOTECH 50,000iu but also Vitalady 50,000iu Mfgd by Bio-Tech Pharmacal and distributed by Vitalady It's only a $1 cheaper but it all adds up. Their shipping to UK costs more so not for me, but they may be cheaper for you?
The higher doses of vitamin D supplied on prescription are D2 but certainly not this over the counter form.
I don't see the point in buying 100,000iu as these 50,000iu are pretty small and cheap and for most people one a week is sufficient, and one every 5 days provides 10,000iu/d ideal for creating vitamin D reserves providing you cheap checking 25(OH)D regularly to ensure you notice when your level begins to creep over 60ng/ml. When it's over 80ng/ml you can then reduce intake (by extending the number of days between capsules) to try to maintain a high but stable 25(OH)D @ 60ng/ml.

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I agree with what Nanette says above. It is dangerous with the Vitamin D and other supplements IF you have hyperparathyroidism. I was assuming that the standard testing for that had been done along with the Vitamin D level. Have you been tested to rule out hyperparathyroidism?

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