New Painkiller for Osteoarthritis Pain?

I was just asking my pcp the other day why there isn't some kind of pain medicine that won't either destroy my stomach or make me tired and constipated. My son, who is a student at MIT, sent me this article and I was like, YES! And trust me, as someone who's stomach, vocal chords and now apparently sinuses have been damaged by ibuprofen, not to mention the osteoporosis I have possibly caused by methotrexate, (I'm 45 & premenopausal w/ a form of RA that I took MTX for) I am definitely NOT one to rashly jump on a new med bandwagon. I usually make it a rule not to take ANY new med until it's been on the market at least five years, preferably longer, (look at what happened w. Fosomax, Vioxx, etc) But right now this sounds pretty good. Not that it's on the market, yet. But, read this:
http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/26406/?a=f

Then I got to thinking, about most likely the bone side effect being from overtaxing and I decided that, since my joints are going anyway, I would take the chance-might as well have a shorter time of significant ability leading to disability than a long, drawn out road to exponentially increasing disability which is what I seem to be on now. I'm in pain every day anyway, every year that goes by brings more disability-instead, why not one good year of being able to do things without limitation and then disability. I feel like I have things to do, dagnabit! I'd be interested in other's thoughts, particularly younger people who might fee like I do, that they're skipping middle age, and jumping right into elderlyhood.

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I wonder if People like me could take tanezumab . As of now all pain med make me sick. I have no help for Pain. I hope this come on the market soon.

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Sounds great...hope it doesn't take 10 years to make it to the public.

Thanks...

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It sounds good, but the side effects are pretty scary! The fact that bones that are deteriorating to the point of having to be replaced shortly after the treatment of the drug and they weren't the ones (the joint) that the person that was taking the drug for that has to the replaced has to be of concern. I have enough trouble with my bones deteriorating too fast to have them go even faster due to a drug. I don't think it would be for me.

Sincerely,

CubbieFan2308

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Cubbiefan, I totally understand that. But they think (I guess still trying to prove) that this happens because the person feels so much better that they're so much more active and then the bones give out sooner. It's not like they weren't going to, anyway, like they're theorizing that it's not the medicine itself that causes the destruction, but the increased activity-apparently it's TOO effective. My thought is this: At least for myself, and I'm relatively young, (45), my joints are obviously going...right now trying to hold off on a new knee because I just can't face another surgery, psychologically that is, and was also supposed to get a triple fusion in my left foot....I can't take nsaids anymore because of stomach lining issues, so am stuck with vicodin. Still, I'm in pain every day, altho granted, I am used to it, but more and more it's cutting down on my activities. And yet...my bones still continue to deteriorate. SO....I'm thinking, would I trade feeling GOOD and being able to DO things for a short while but paying with earlier serious disability vs this exhausting and limiting pain every damn day, while still heading down the path to total disability albeit slower? Hell yeah, I would! It's almost like, do you go into the ocean one toe at a time or do you just jump in? Although maybe not so great an analogy since that denotes FUN and not so much fun in this bone scenario. It's moot for me anyway, because if you have a dx of rheumatoid arthritis you're not eligible for the trials and by the time it gets to the market, I'm almost for sure to be non-ambulatory....sigh. It's a nice thought, though.

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My mom, who has multiple joint osteoarthritis and not osteoporosis, was in one of the studies for this drug. She will be having a knee replaced in two weeks. It needed to be replaced anyway, but while she was on the drug she felt good and WAY overdid things and ended up with a ruptured achilles tendon- not running, or jumping, just plain walking around. At the time I questioned whether the drug was working too well- making her think that she was OK when in reality significant damage was occurring. Her gait deteriorated while on the drug (before the rupture) but she felt good and kept walking. I wonder what other joints she will need to have replaced, and at her age whether they will even consider. Perhaps the old adage "if it sounds too good to be true it probably is" is correct in this case. Sorry if I am bursting a few bubblles here, and yes, I hope and pray that there WILL be a medication without side effects SOON.

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I think I will wait until its been out a while. I cannot take any meds for pain either. Everything has too many side affects that bother my stomach. I just tried Lyrica-no go-and have tried several meds for arthritis-all of which the side affects were worse than the pain. So will pass on this one also but thanks for info RQAJ.

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I guess my theology on this one is that I've already had over 70 bone surgeries due to deterioration of my joints, so if there is a possibility that a drug will aide in the deterioration process, then I think it is too big a risk for me. I'm already having three or more joint surgeries a year. I'm only 51 (well, I'll be 52 in Nov.), I started having joint surgeries when I was 18. I have a rare bone disease called Stickler Syndrome, added to that Osteoporosis (T score of -3.8), so I don't need any more strikes against me.

Whether or not to take this drug if and when it comes on the market will have to be a personal decision that each and every one of us will have to make. If it is released as it is right now, for me the answer would be no. If, for some reason, they are able to fix this issue so that the risk is much smaller for the deterioration of other joints, then I might think about it. All I was saying in my earlier post was, that for me, the risk is just too high.

Sincerely,

CubbieFan2308

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Wow, good thoughts on both sides RQAJ and Cubbie!

RQ - I understand not wanting more surgeries - I'm 50 and have had 6 knee surgeries (the last was a TKR) and a double fusion in the neck. (Cubbie, I thought that was a lot, I can't imagine 70!)

I am tired of both pain and surgery, but can't seem to escape either one. It would be nice to be able to take a med that gets rid of the pain that well, but I'd still worry about side effects (since if there is one, I'm likely to have it).

I can also say that if I took something that worked that well, I expect I would overdo it. As a teacher, I feel bad that my team has to do so much of the physical work for me. (I try to make it up by doing the nitty-gritty stuff for them.) I would feel the need to 'carry my weight' physically and probably wear my joints out much faster.

This one will take a lot of thought for each of us if it ever makes it to the market.

On an aside, RQ, the best thing I ever did was to get my knee replaced. As tired as I am of having surgery, when the other one needs it, I'll get it done before I ever get to the level of the 1st one. I waited 6 years (was considered too young) for the 1st, and am pretty certain that waiting that long caused my spine to deteriorate much faster. (50% of my spine is now full of arthritis, bad discs, and bone spurs.)

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thanks, Karodra. Altho' I've had a form of R.A. since my teenage days, somehow I've managed to avoid the most debilitating aspects of the disease, until recently. So I'm kind of still in denial about the whole disability thing-I realize that while I'm totally aware on an intellectual level the emotional aspect has yet to catch up...I've had 11 surgeries, all toll and some not even orthopedic-two within the last year on the same foot for the same thing,

How does one end up with 6 surgeries on the same knee? That sounds like a nightmare!

Personally, I'm still not convinced that anybody actually knows exactly what's going on with my bones...this has been a loooong road, I won't get too far into for purposes of brevity, but, for instance, I'd never even had a problem with my knee -not that I consciously registered. I vaguely recall a few times thinking it might be getting funky but never enough to even mention it to the doc-then 2 mos. ago, apropos of nothing, it just collapsed-the most descriptive word I can think of. The original theory was meniscus tear but the MRI apparently says that I have total loss of cartilage & other than synvisc (which I have yet to have, first one scheduled on Fri) the only solution is TKR. I'm dubious-is it that I somehow repressed all the levels of degeneration that led to this? If so, I guess I should be thankful.

Regarding this theoretical painkiller, if I am to be completely honest I confess that while I talk a mean game in theory, if I were in reality, faced with this decision-because I KNOW if I had no or greatly reduced pain, I'd go for broke & destroy my joints-I don't know what I would do. And despite my life-long status as a patient, this all seems so sudden altho they tell me that, according to all the recent diagnostics, I should have been and should be even now, far more disabled than I am. I still don't get it, and I guess I'm one of those pain in the rear patients that needs everything spelled out. In the meantime I hobble about in pain and cranky, (knowing that I should be thankful that I'm upright yet not feeling the gratitude)... it's not even the pain that gets to me so much, pain I'm old 'friends' with, it's the inability to push through it and do things that I'm struggling with. I guess I'm kind of being a baby about it.

Incidentally, today is a big day for me- I finally have my appointment with a rheumatologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery. I'm really hoping for some new insight but at the same trying to prepare myself for disappointment. Wish me luck!

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Contrebass, I'm curious, (or nosy)...what is your mother's take on it? Was it worth it? Or does she regret taking the medicine?

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I know about the denial thing. I deny that I am disabled and try and keep up with the Jones' so to speak, even though I suffer quite a bit with debilitating pain. I walked around on a broken knee for 6 mo. before the doctor finally agreed that there was something wrong with it and agreed to go ahead and re-replace the knee. When he got in there, he told the whole operating room that he was wrong & I was right. What had happened is that I had had the knee replaced and my therapist had pushed too hard and broke the knee where it joined at the long bone on the right (I can't remember the name of it to save my soul right now.) Anyway, it had been that way for 6 mo. until the doctor realized that there really was something wrong with it. Right up until the day before surgery he didn't want to do the surgery, but I told him that there definitely was something wrong, so he went ahead and operated. Surprise, surprise! I guess I can handle just a little bit of pain.

I keep on telling my doctors that I am on the "fix as you go program." They get one joint fixed, and another one breaks down. It has been that way since I was 18 years old. I have Stickler Syndrome and basically that is a collagen disease, which is found throughout your body. What happens is the cartilage wears away and then it is bone against bone. This causes the bones to deteriorate quite rapidly. For instance, I had a cage put in my back at the L-5, S-1 level. Three months later, the disc above it deteriorated and they ended up doing what was called a 360 degree fusion, going through my stomach to fuse the other side of the discs. That was a horrible surgery, probably the worst one I ever had.

This is why I know that if I had a drug that would mask the pain to the point that I would overdo, I know myself enough that I would definitely overdo to the point that it would be hazardous to my joints. But I guess we each have to know ourselves to the point that if this drug does ever make it to the market that we can make that decision for ourselves. Believe me, I am tempted. It would be great to be without pain. But to chance letting myself to overcome the boundaries may be too much. I'm glad I have some time to think about it.

Sincerely,

CubbieFan2308

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RQAJ- not nosy at all. Couple of things first- my mom lives 900 miles from me so I see her infrequently enough that it is easy to see changes when I DO see her, and those changes worried me. second, I am a PT so observing gait and skeletal changes is part of my business. third- I have significant knee OA and hoped like many others that this drug would be the breakthrough.
As to whether Mom has regrets- I don't think so, BUT she tends not to be a very good advocate for herself w/ doctors. Throughout the study I shared my concerns with her, and she kept saying how good she felt when she was on the drug. I will be caring for her after the surgery and may have more of that conversation.
For those of you who have such significant pain it is understandable to want something to work. Just please be very careful when this gets on the market!

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Have had fractures( spinal,legs,hip,pelvis,ribs, 2 shoulders, feet and arms) since I was 45 y/o, know what pain is. I too can not take heavy pain meds. I refuse to live in pain though. I tried Marijuana, last October and I could walk/stand up and pain went down to a 3 ( out of 10). I am currently on Darvocet and IBP. I am moving to a state where it is medically legally available. I am a small woman and there are big women in prisons ,here!!!

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How do you feel about darvon being taken off the market by FDA? I am upset, thank God, I just got a refill, I use darvon every day along my fentanaly patch.

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Wow, I haven't had a prescription for Darvon since the 80's!

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Oh dh45 mentioned it...it is one of the pain meds that does not make me feel loopy durning the day! Actually I take the darvocette, no aspirin in it. But now with it off the market I am not sure what I will do. I have had at least 10 knee surgeries and now use a wheelchair and walker along with other medical problems, so pain is a constant. Oh well, life one day at a time Aloha

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Tanezumab sounds scary! Its name is too similar to Prolia (denosumab). I don't think I'd like a pain medicine to mess around with my immune system. I'd rather talk to mother nature about relieving pain.

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unfortunately, I tried to have a conversation with Mother Nature about relieving my pain and she bitch-slapped me.

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Damn.

I hear you though. I am in a similar boat without much relief. And Mother Nature made me so anxiety ridden...it wasn't worth it...but it made a great story. I am also in your age group, I am 41, and my body has fallen to pieces (literally). It all started when I was 20 and life sucked rocks each year since.

I will say though...after Forteo didn't work out for me...my doctor suggested Prolia...after going through my history with Crohn's...he said it would surely cause harm because my immunity is lowered.

My doctor just prescibed an anti-inflammatory patch (different than the flextor patches and there's no lidocane in them)...I can't tell you the name of it since I haven't picked it up from the pharmacy...have no idea if it's open today. I still have no faith it will work. But I have been persistant with my doctor and have tried many pain relievers...morphine, methadone, hydrocodone, etc. I had great relief with some of them...but it was the side effects that deterred me.

The big question though...why are we suffering at such young ages with these issues? I also have hips ripped to shreds and severe osteoporosis and RSD/CRPS. I have other issues but these are the most pressing. Doctors cannot give us answers. Is it our society? Can we blame the food industry for all if it's ways to cut costs by synthetic additives and hormones? Who knows...but it sure makes me wonder. I see kids here and this forum and it just makes me sick!

I do believe our society and the way we are taught to live has a lot to do with how we ended up on this f'd up path.

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Oh and I meant to add genetics didn't help either!

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