High calcium in blood, but low vitamin D

I just got my blood test result. It is showing that my blood calcium is 10.9 and my vitamin D is only 8.7 (deficiency). How is that possible?

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I did haematology and not biochemistry, so my comment may not be100% accurate, but my understanding is that your blood calcium level can alter during the day according to different factors, say forexample you have taken a supplement of calcium or an extreme example would be if you had broken a bone, your blood calcium level would rocket. This blood calcium level is NOT a measure of what your bone calcium is.

If you are not absorbing the calcium into your bones, but taking in calcium in diet and supplement your blood calcium may well be normal or high, while your bones are still deficient in calcium. Your doctor needs to investigate this further.

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I think Lyn gave you a good answer :)
My calcium level was normal, but my D level was only 20. I just assumed w/o the proper D level I was not absorbing calcium into my bones, even though I was taking in good levels of it.
I take 5000-6000 iu each day of Vit D. I assume you are supplementing too? Just had my level rechecked but don't have any results yet.

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ttmmkk, I think you should take a look at this http://parathyroid.com/low-vitamin-d.htm
and discuss it with your doctor. You could have Hyperparathyroidism, that is a second cause to Osteoporosis and
as I understand it when that is treated your bones will get better.

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thanks for replies!
LynH, I don't need 100% accurate. I only need 99% (just kidding). Any reply would be very appreciated.
since my vitamin D level is really low, i have to take some supplements. But the more i take these supplements, the higher blood calcium i get. My question is that is there any way to raise my vitamin D level, but not blood calcium?

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Better have your doctor recheck your serum calcium and also your parathyroid hormone. Serum calcium above 10 is not normal for an adult and in most cases the person has hyperparathyroidism. As someone else mentioned you should google parathyroid.com.

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I had my TSH checked and it is normal. Is there any different between TSH and PTH ?

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There is a very big difference between TSH and PTH. TSH deals with your thyroid. PTh is the hormone produced by your parathyroids. You have four parathyroids and they control the calcium in your blood. If any one of the parathyroids is not functioning properly then your body will think it needs to release more calcium into your blood. It will take the calcium from your bones causing osteoporosis. Read parathyroid.com because it explains it very well there.

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ttmmkk, I agree with 2lessparathyroid: "Serum calcium above 10 is not normal for an adult and in most cases the person has hyperparathyroidism" - that is also what I have read. Do read up on this and talk to your doctor.
Please see also this page about Causes for high Blood Calcium http://parathyroid.com/high-calcium.htm
Did you read the following in the link I posted before? http://parathyroid.com/low-vitamin-d.htm They say that "if you have Hyperparathyroidism and you take high doses of vitamin D your blood calcium will get even higher and this can be dangerous."
You said " the more i take these supplements, the higher blood calcium i get."

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Ttmmkk, high blood calcium level can be dangerous. What did you dr say about your results? Please ask to see an enodcrinologist for further testing, and an explanation of what might be going on. Did you read www.parathyroid.com? Very informative site.
I've just been diagnosed with possible hyperparathyroidism and went for a scan today, won't see the endo for results though until end of July. Hope they found something! It would be nice to find an actual cause of this osteoporosis that has wrecked my spine.
good luck

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My doctor wrote on the result that i have to take D3 4000 iu for 3 months. I have been taking it for 3 days. For the last 3 days, i feel like a lot of pain going through my body, and some muscle spasm. I will not see him until middle of july.

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ttmmkk, the 4000iu he has suggested you take is what I take daily, and have been for about a year. I got my Vit.D level up to 76. But if you feel its the Vit.D that is causing you pain, I would stop it for a week and see if the pain goes away. If it does, restart and see if it comes back. Though it seems unlikely to me that Vit.D would cause pain.
You could also sunbathe without sunscreen for short periods each day, just be careful to come inside before your skin starts to burn.
Good web site on Vit.D here
www.vitamindcouncil.org

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Dr. Gominak has some VERY informative info on D, check YouTube videos.
First off, it is NOT a vitamin, but a HORMONE that all diurnal animals produce
with interaction with sunlight! Humans produce ~ 20,000IU per day, D3 not D2!
If it is not at the proper level, all sorts of body chemistry can be out of wack.
Dr. Stumpf did the research in the 80s & was ignored by the medical community.
The proper levels will help your bones do their jobs more efficiently,
and proper absorption of calcium is high on that list. Then you can decrease
any calcium supplements. High blood calcium Can cause other problems.

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Most people who have elevated serum calcium should not take vitamin D as stated in Parathyroid.com. If you have hyperparathyroidism taking Vitamin D can be dangerous. When I had parathyroid disease I could not take any vitamin D because it made all my symptoms much worse. My blood pressure would go up, my bones and joints would hurt, I would fell sick to my stomach just to mention a few.

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Well, I suppose we all react differently.....I am being investigated for hyperparathyroidism and my endocrinologist said its okay to keep taking Vit.D3, but to stop calcium supplementation for now. I don't actually have any symptoms except the high blood calcium, so I guess I'm lucky in that respect.

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Dichotomy: A double sided Truth. We are ALL the same, yet we are ALL different.
I come to this from almost 60 years of undiagnosed Celiac disease. Gluten.
250-300 documented symptoms. Any Auto-immune disease has lots of variables.
Celiacs have a high incidence of thyroid problems also. My levels are right in range.
Most humans produce 20,000IU of D3 in as little as 1/2 Hr of sunshine. I have found that
when I am told my someone "this/that' is the cause & I should believe them just
because they have a 'Doctor' in front of their name to do more research! Lots!
As arrowsp said, "we all react differently". These forums help us to find OUR
particular truth, amidst all the 'correct' answers...

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i just asked my doctor for the PTH test. I had it done right after that at 6 pm in the his office without fasting. Is the PTH test supposed to be done in the morning with fasting? He said "no"

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You can look up blood test, requirements and results, here
www.labtestsonline.org

When I asked my dr for the tests I requests
Ionized blood calcium
PTH
24 hr urine calcium
because I found them listed here
http://www.betterbones.com/bonehealth/medicaltestingforosteoporosis.aspx

It is the results from those three tests together that told the endo I am hyperparathyroid.
the blood calcium was high, the PTH was within normal range, the 24 hr urine calcium was within normal range towards the high end.

I'm not sure if having just the PTH test will tell you anything, but I could be wrong, this info is all new to me.
good luck

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Thanks Ted, that is reassuring.

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Ted - Thank you for that new info.

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