Calcium Oxalate Crystals in Urine?

Hi,

I have a new primary care physician who came well recommended and whom I like.

I just had a physical, and he called to tell me that my blood and urine tests were normal. As usual, I requested a copy of the report.

I just now had a chance to review it in depth. The good news is that my Vitamin D has increased from 21.1 last Dec. to 34.6 now, which I was happy to see.

I was less happy, however, to see a finding of calcium oxalate crystals in my urine. What does this mean?

Has anyone ever had this show up in urine test results? If so, what did you do about it?

Thanks so much,
Uma

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Hi Uma: When I had this, it developed into a kidney stone. If you look up calcium oxalate crystals, it says: "Calcium oxalate is a chemical compound that forms crystals. It is the main reason for kidney stones." I'm not saying that you'll eventually have a kidney stone, but I would ask your Dr. about it and think about seeing a urologist, since you don't want to have a kidney stone if you can prevent it. Get your 64 ozs of water a day, if you can.

But check it out with your Dr. who ordered the test and see what he/she says about it. You can have stones that are small that don't pose a problem and you'll just pass them without notice, but I'd look into anyway, since others can grow too large to pass easily and they're very painful. Again this may not happen, but take precaution anyway.

Good luck...

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Hi Windblown,

Thanks for your very helpful reply.

May I ask if you still are taking calcium supplements and if so, how much per day?

Also, did you make any changes in your diet as a result of the kidney stone?

Thanks again,
Uma

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Hi Uma, no I didn't make any changes to my diet. I make sure I get enough water (64 ozs) and I did lower my calcium, but I did that several years before the kidney stone. I take about 400-500 mgs of calcium and get the rest from my diet.

I did have hypercalcemia (of unknown origin) several years before the kidney stone, and was never able to figure out the cause. So that's when I lowered my calcium intake, and switched to getting most from my diet.

Do you ever have blood in your urine, or difficulty urinating? If so, see a urologist. Even if you have microscopic levels of blood (which you can't see) get a second opinion if you can.

No I didn't make any changes in my diet following the stone either. I eat plenty of veggies/fruit and adequate protein so I didn't see a need to change anything.

I hope you find out what's going on!!! And good luck to you...

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Hi Windblown,

I really appreciate your feedback on my discussion. I am taking about 515 mg calcium so I think I am probably OK.

Thank you very much again,
Uma

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Make sure you're getting some K2 in there.

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I think that your 500 mg of Calcium is enough if you are not losing bone mass. You may need more Vitamin D3 eventually and maybe more Calcium after adding Magnesium and Vitamin K2. Your body needs enough Magnesium, about half of your total calcium intake, to balance the Calcium intake as Magnesium is used with Calcium and prevents its deposition in the body. Magnesium also competes with Calcium for absorption.

Vitamin K2 is very important, new research shows this is the primary chemistry that removes calcium from many areas of the body and places it into the bones, helping to manage bone structure and quality along the way. I read in research that Vitamin K2 carboxylates a chemical in the bladder, making it more able to keep calcium in solution, so it appears Vitamin K2 levels are directly involved with your calcium crystals problem.

A good Vitamin K2 supplement would have 1000 to 2000 mcg of the MK-4 fraction and 100 mcg of the MK-7 fraction.

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Uma,

Calcium oxalate crystals are the most common type of crystals found in urinalyses and can be found in both healthy individuals and stone formers. These crystals may or may not go to form kidney stones, depending on how well hydrated you are and other factors.
If you are a stone former, avoid foods very high in oxalates such as spinach, chard and beet greens, rhubarb, and soy products. Be sure to drink lots of water and lemon juice.

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BoneLady,

Thanks so much for your reply.

This is the first I have heard that having these crystals may not be a cause for concern, so thank you.

I've never had a kidney stone. However, a sonogram in January showed innumerable small calcifications in my kidneys, so I am trying to be very careful with both my water intake and the foods I eat.

I hadn't heard about the no soy products. I'm assuming this includes tofu as well.

Thanks again,
Uma

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Hi Uma,

I had calcium in my urine--I don't know if it was calcium oxalate crstals--but my nephrologist told me I need to drink 3 liters of water and excrete 2.5 liters of urine a day to prevent future stones. A CT scan showed I had 3 small stones in the right kidney and 1 larger stone in the kidney they removed. You might try upping your water intake. This might help dilute any crystals.

I'm with the other folks that said to ask your doctor for an explanation.

Susan

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HI Susan,

Thanks so much for your reply.

I just did a conversion which shows 3 liters of water equals almost 13 8-oz. glasses of water. I have been drinking 8 so definitely will increase it!

Uma

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Uma,

Yes, all soy products are high in oxalates. Tofu is especially high in oxalate content, with one-half cup of soy tofu containing over 200 mg per serving.

The National Kidney Stone Foundation has an excellent website at www.kidney.org/. I have a table of "The Oxalate Content of Food," which includes all food categories, and I believe came from their website. The table is divided into three sections for high (>10 mg oxalates/serving), moderate (5-10 mg/serving) and low (<5 mg/serving).

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BoneLady,

Thank you so much for this link. This is exactly what I need.

Uma

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