Mental Illness and Adult Daughter

I have a 28 year old daughter with some kind of mental illness. I am not sure what, since doctors will not tell us anything. She lives with us, will not get any help and has caused damage to our home and our health. I have been told by medical experts and police my only option is to evict her. Is there somewhere for her to go and get help?

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My ex sister-in-law is schizophrenic, and lives in Florida. She lives in an assisted living facility provided by the state. I don't know where you live, but your daughter should be able to get assistance from SSI if your in the states. Of course she will need to be diagnosed. I wish you well.

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If you live in tx send me message

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Thank you for your response. We live in Ca. They want me to cancel her medical ins. Before she is considered for any assistance. I am willing to help pay for a group home, for some reason Ca. Wants to put all the expense on the tax payers. She just needs to be in a place where she will follow the rules and start to live somewhat independent. Only thing I want is some guidance

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I for one don't mind helping mental health patients, or disabled people via my tax dollars. I sure hope that if I were to become disabled that my government, in which I have paid taxes for over 40 years would be able to help me. I think that the Social Security office would have a case worker for your daughter to give guidance. Not absolutley sure though. Lori

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You have options other than eviction. I'm sure you want what's best for your daughter so she can have a life of her own. People experiencing some type of mental health issue need the close support of their family. This is not her fault, she didn't ask for this and she's not herself right now. It is possible to help her regain her life and at the same time, get your daughter back. You can message me and I can give you guidance.

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One of the things that I did was call my daughter's doctor nurse and told her I understood the rules and told her the things that were going on, The doctor could not call me back but he received my message. Maybe you can do the same and ask for a family group dicussion and he can get your daughter to agree. Just keep it short just tell them our daughter lives here and we have our own health issues and damage to your home etc. Tell them you care and just would like to help her in anyway but right now you don't want to go the legal (jail) if we don't know what you are dealing with. The nurse can not also give you information but can let the doctor know what is going on at home and let him handle your daughter about having a group sessions. Let him know she has family that wants to help

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What are her symptoms? Perhaps there is a way the eviction can be avoided?

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Perhaps she can get Medicaid, then if she is willing, can get some out patient therapy and perhaps medication that might help.

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Have you tried to get her on disability? That might help pay for a residential treatment center.
I also have an adult daughter with paranoid schizophrenia.
Diane

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My daughter is 25, suffering from schizophrenia and protected by the law to make all her own decisions. She has a psychiatrist that has been trying to get her back onto medication and out of her current bout of psychosis. Her first episode was 30 months ago. She was doing well until last August. She had turned to alcohol as a self-medication and that turned out badly. She turned to AA and that has helped. She is relatively high-functioning but refuses treatment because she does not have the self-awareness in this state of mind to recognize her departures from reality. Even her friends are coaxing her to comply with the doctor but to no avail.
On Friday she was discharged from the hospital after 6 weeks and is now in the wind. Her doctor recommended we leave her alone to try finding a place and managing without our help. I feel like I failed her. But the doctor believes this way she will not resent us (or him) for letting her try to move forward - rather than stuck in the hospital ward.
I have recently been practising the LEAP method of improving communications with my daughter. I recommend you take a look at www.leapinstitute.org to learn how to maintain or improve communication while your daughter is struggling to understand and come to grips with her illness. Unfortunately it is her burden to bear. I would do anything to help my daughter but she needs to want the help. I share your frustration. I am in anguish and trying to survive my own fears for her safety and recovery to a better and rational state of mind. I hope you can get her the help she needs - but you will also need to take care of yourself because until she is ready for help you need to avoid burn-out. I wish I could tell you that it will all get better. Personal experience has shown this is a life sentence for our loved one. Preparation is the key to faster recoveries after psychosis but there is no cure to prevent future occurrences. Wishing you all the best.

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Thank you all for your help. I am devastated to tell all that my daughter has committed suiside

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Tlynns I am so sorry. You are in my prayers.
Diane

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Tlynns, I am so sorry for your loss.

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Dear Tlynns - I am truly sorry to hear of your loss. I was hoping to help with my post but now feel I must apologize that I have caused you more pain. Please believe that she made a sad and tragic choice not because of you but because she was ill. Her mind was not the same as the girl you raised and nutured. I believe she did not willingly choose her departure from this reality. It was a betrayal of mind driven by her fears and pain. Remember the daughter you loved and forgive her. The illness is at fault. Your previous message was Dec 27. So we have no idea when her situation became unbearable to her. As parents we grieve with you by imagining how we would suffer. My hope is that you seek guidance and take care to work through the pain of loss. Talk to your trusted loved ones, family and counsellors. Grieve as you see fit - but then - recover and start to live again. Remember the good times and let go of the pain when you are ready.

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