port surgery

How do they put a port in? how big is it? What's it made of?
Thanks
Mary

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lol - it's easy - they put you into a "twilight state" - with versid (i think) then they put the port in right wear your bra strap would be if you are a woman (don't count on wearing a bra any time soon) it's about the size of a coke bottle top. It's relatively painless once it's in and will save you alot of misery down the road. It's plastic - i think.....It's put in at the hospital - (about 30 minutes - sometimes less) and trust me - worth it!!!!! Get it - and move on!!! Good Luck!
Karen

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NO BRA??? Are you kidding? I wear a 36DD, do you get a visual on braless Thanks for the advice Karen it's really appreciated

Mary

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My dad said it was a piece of cake. The incision is very small. They give you versed. You really won't remember much. I'm not sure which device you are going to have. My dad has the power port. They all are made of titanium w/ a special non-degradeable rubber in the middle where the needle is placed for acess. My dad was in & out in about 30 min. Was a little sore, but not really bad. But this small amount of discomfort will be well worth not turning yourself into a pin cushion. I've been an RN now for 20 yrs. and acessing the devices myself, I can tell you it's just as easy for us as it is for you. Good Luck!!!! Take care.....S

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I have had 2 ports, just got the second one about 3 weeks ago and was able to wear a bra both times, even the day of the procedure, without any problems. I too wear a DD and actually found that not wearing a bra caused pulling at the port sight and made it hurt more until it was healed. They do put them in your upper chest, near the shoulder. Neither of mine have been under the bra strap. I read where one gal marked on her chest with a marker where her bra strap normally fit and asked the surgeon to not put it there! Not a bad idea for us well endowed girls. I don't know what kind of port you are getting but if you google " Bard power port" Bard, the maker of the port, has a web sight with pictures of the port and lots of info. Some ports are bigger than others, the power port is about the size of a quarter. My first one was a bit smaller, about the size of a nickle. It took about 2-3 three weeks for the soreness from the surgery to resolve, but after that I don't even know it is there, except for the bump under my skin. It is so easy to use, and a lot less painful than getting an IV.
Good luck,
t

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you can get "under garments" that have wide straps so it won't rub against it - or a sports bra - but NO - no "regular" bra unless they put the port someplace else.....you can ask...
K-

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Thanks S
That info makes me feel a little better. I'll find out on Tues Thanks again
Mary aka Willets

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My mom just got her port a few days ago and it's still covered with gauze. She will get her first chemo with it on Tuesday. Kathy

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Thanks Kathy
I'll be getting my first port on Tues as well. Let me know how your mother does.
Namaste
Mary

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My only suggestion in addition to the above is if you sleep on your right side mostly, get the port on your left side and vice versa. Unfortunately mine is on the right and I tend to sleep on my right. Have had it for quite some time now but every now and then it bothers me a little. Small price to pay to save the veins.
Cheryll

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Thanks for the insight Cheryll, When I get one I'll keep that in mind
Mary

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My port is a blessing. All my veins usually collapse, that is if they could even get a line going in a vein, which usually they couldnt.

Mine was 3-6 in. from my bra strap..closer to the center. surgeon i had said they take that into consideration. sorry karen doesnt sound like your surgeon was very considerate. its a breeze and life saver. not only is it for chemo but my blood tests and IVs all the times ive been in the hospital due to chemo/radiation.
robin

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Thanks Robin
You are definitely in the majority. I'm giving it one treatment before I put it in
Hugs to you
Mary

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Quick heads up, have them use paper tape after they take the line out. I had trouble with the regular tape. I don't know if anybody else has experienced this but it seemed like this was not the first time the nurses had seen this type of reaction. Chemo does weird things to you and I became allergic right away. No problems now that I have the port.

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I knew there were alternatives to the usual protocol..
we'll see what happens,. Thanks much mamanolte for the heads up .
hugs to you
Mary

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Willets: One of the best pieces of advice given me was to get a port. They usually have trouble finding my veins and I heard all kinds of horror stories about what chemo can do to them so, even though I wanted as little additional contact possible, I got one. The procedure was relatively short - I didn't feel anything. Had to keep a small bandage over it for a week or so. When I got chemo there was no problem (also got lidocaine salve placed over the port before the needle went in). The staff was also able to do all my blood work that way. It made such a scarey situation far less painful and gave me more peace of mind that they wouldn't be struggling to administer the chemo. I figure that anything that can make one's life easier during such a traumatic time - I'll do! Whatever your decision is, I wish you the very best! Blessings! Brooklynda

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Great advice...I'm going to do it after the 1st round next Tues.
Thanks much for your insight
Mary

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