How quickly will a lung tumor shrink?

My father found out on Thursday that he has 2 small spots on one of his lungs. He had radiation and Chemo (for 3 days) on Friday. Saturday morning they had to tub him, he developed pneumonia. They did an X-Ray yesterday and said that the pneumonia has gotten better. But they cannot remove the tub as of yet. They also did a scope yesterday and found that a tumor is blocking his whole left lung. They cannot continue with the radiation until the tub is removed. They will be doing a CT scan today to see how the tumor and to verify that the cancer has not spread.

My question is, what has been your results with Chemo (with or without radiation) on how quickly a tumor has shrank. Number of treatments, % of shrinking, etc.

Thank you in advance for you help and support.

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I am confused by your post. How did they find out he had spots? Did they do a biopsy to identify what they are? Why would they be doing chemo and radiation without determining what the spots are? Do you mean he had a tube inserserted? If so what type, location and purpose was the tube put in for?

Briefly, when spots are found on the lung, the usual procedure is to define them with a CT scan. Today it is customary to take a PET scan, next, to determine if the spots are growing or "Hot." (Cancers are growing tumors). If the PET scan indicates they are growing, the next step is to biopsy them to determine if they are malignant or benign. If they are determined to be malignant (cancerous). most commonly, if they are confined to a single lung, they are removed by surgery. If for some reason the surgery is not possible or if the PET scan reveals growth outside of the lung, then chemo and/or radiation are used to scrink or burn out much of the disease! If the spots are not hot, or extremely small, it is customary to observe them at intervals with CT scans to determine if they are spreading. While there are many exceptions, this is the normal sequence of events in diagnosing and treating lung cancer.

Pneumonia is treated with anticibotics.

Your describption is very confusing. What you need to realize is that cancer is an incredibly complex disease that is commonly treated only by teams of doctors who specializae in lung cancer diagnosis and treatment! You need to understand that lung cancer is especizlly deadly when not treated by experts.
Family physicians and most pulmonologists (Lung specialists) are not quealified by training and certainly by experience to treat lung cancer!

Can you give us more information that those of us who have had or are undergoing treatment for this disease can assist you?

HighlandGuy

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Sorry,

They have done a CT and a biopsy. It is small cell. The spots are 1.8 and 2.3. The hospital that we are at will only do a PET scan as an out patient. The tub that I described about is the oxygen and feeding tub. He is and has been in ICU since Saturday. They did 2 CT scans tonight (chest/lungs and lower abdomen). We should know the results tomorrow. The 3 main Dr.s that are taking care of him are will the hospital and all deal with cancer. As soon as the results are back tomorrow, I will hopefully know more.

We just found out late, late Thursday night that it is cancer and the hospital started treatment ASAP. I am hoping that he gets better to take the tub out, and I will be transfering him to a hospital that deals only with cancer.

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Hi Jake,

My mom was diagnosed with limited SCLC in June 2008. She started chemo (Cisplatin and VP -16 (Etoposide)) 3 days after her diagnosis, and had 6 rounds spread out over 5 months. After the final round, only 2% of the tumor remained. She had PCI and chest radiation afterward, and her next scans showed only radiation 'changes', no tumor! She goes in for a PET scan tomorrow, and we have our fingers crossed that the scans will remain clear. Hope this helps! Good luck and I'll be thinking about you and your dad.

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My dad's first bout of SCLC responded almost immediately to the chemo and radiation. They knew in days that it was working. The ventilator (I think that is what your dad has) was probably put in to maintain the oxygen flow and to allow the nurses to suction the lung and clear the pneumonia. People can and do come off of ventilators and this will prob. happen as soon as his condition stabilizes, as far as the lungs and pneumonia go. The feeding tube is there because while on the ventilator (that goes down the throat,) the patient is usually sedated. They can not eat, so nutrition is given by tube through the nose or inserted through the stomach (peg tube). These are also removable, and once the ventilator can be removed, a swalllowing eval will be done to make sure that the throat is not inflamed from the vent and that the swallow is normal. If the swallow needs a little time to come back, the tube will be kept in and swallowing therapy will be done.
The biggest thing that you can do is to encourage your dad. He can hear you, but he can't respond due to sedation. Speak with him and tell him that he is beating this thing. All tubes can be removed. Pray and offer comforting words. You both can get through this. Question all doctors and make sure that you get the best help possible. Be an advocate for your dad while he can't speak for himself. Believe.
Pat

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My dad had bad facial swelling and had a squeeky voice when he was diagnosed due to superior vena cava syndrome. They started chemo right away before discharge and within 2 days the swelling was down and his voice was closer to normal than it had been in weeks. Chemo works fast!

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My mum has NSCLC, was wrapped around an artery so inoperable, squamous cell.

She had 3 months of chemo, which didnt work at all, but they tried then a new combo of drugs, plus radiation, and the 5cm tumour had shrunk away to nothing at her 4 month scan. Don't know whether it was gone sooner, but even that seems amazing to me!!

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My father was diagnosed with ext sclc in December, he had mets to his brain, spine, liver. He had 22 rounds of radiation, then 6 rounds of cisp/etop, he had scans after his second, his fourth, and we are setting up times for his scans after his 6th. Also his brain mets were cyberknifed. After his 2nd chemo, his lung tumor, liver met and brain met showed shrinkage, the spine met did not shrink. After 4th chemo, no brain mets, no liver met, no spine mets, lung tumor continue to shrink from the orignial size of a lime to about the size of a walnut. We are hoping for a complete response after the 6th.

hope this helps

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My father was diagnosed with ext sclc in December, he had mets to his brain, spine, liver. He had 22 rounds of radiation, then 6 rounds of cisp/etop, he had scans after his second, his fourth, and we are setting up times for his scans after his 6th. Also his brain mets were cyberknifed. After his 2nd chemo, his lung tumor, liver met and brain met showed shrinkage, the spine met did not shrink. After 4th chemo, no brain mets, no liver met, no spine mets, lung tumor continue to shrink from the orignial size of a lime to about the size of a walnut. We are hoping for a complete response after the 6th.

hope this helps

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I had a CT today and got a VERY odd reading. Everything looked good. She didn't mention my tumor (and me, like an idiot didn't think to ask) but the last time I had on my 6mm tumor had shrunk to next to nothing so I'm assuming that still applies. What was odd was they told me that my lung is much smaller now, but that's from the surgery. I didn't think to say "I didn't have surgery". Now I'm all weirded out and the doctors office is closed until Monday. Where did my lung go? Who has shrinking lungs?

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