Metal based partial dentures are about to become extinct

Metal based partial dentures are about to become extinct

Compared with other technologies that have been replaced with new innovations, partial dentures or removable bridges will soon become a thing of the past because the knowledge to construct them will no longer exist. Unlike the need for full dentures, which has been reduced by preventive dentistry, the demand for partial dentures is on the rise.

The reason that people lose their teeth is not always neglect. Accidents, sports injuries, genetics, prosthesis work done by cheap, less-than-quality laboratories are some of the other reasons. An improperly designed partial that fails to take in the biophysics of the oral cavity can be as damaging.

Unlike a fixed bridge that requires the reduction of healthy teeth and the stress that is put on them to absorb the shock of the entire bridge span during mastication, a partial denture shares the shock with the edentulous ridge and the teeth clasped. By relining the partial every year and a half to two years, the partial can last decades and cost only a fraction of a bridge. Also unlike a cemented bridge, if another tooth is lost in the future, a denture tooth can be easily added to the same partial.

Since the exacting construction of partials involves some very complex procedures, achieving desired results requires expertise. Unfortunately each procedure is usually handled by a technician familiar with only one phase of the construction process. The technician that oversees the entire process from start to finish is the department head of the partial department or the laboratory owner. For a technician to reach that level of expertise requires talent, dedication, and a minimum of five working years under the supervision of an experienced technician. Unfortunately, most of such experienced technicians, such as me, have already left the dental industry. The few dental technology schools in the United States that still remain open no longer teach partial denture construction. Before the handful of talent disappears completely, the knowledge they possess must be passed on to the next generation of technicians.

Various dental, government, and outside organizations must take immediate action if this technology is to survive. I have authored several articles in dental magazines and newspapers calling attention to this problem. The only response generated so far has been from the general public. No one else seems to care.

The dental manufacturers I contacted demonstrated little concern, the officials from the ADA told me that I’m being a pain and asked me to leave them alone. When I attempted to expose the truth in an on line dental journal, I immediately became a target of a few obnoxious dentists and crown and bridge technicians. By eliminating partials all together, they hope to force people to spend money on implants, crowns and bridges, dental work that only the rich can afford.

Arvid Saunaitis
Former certified dental technician - laboratory owner
http://tometalk-erudite.blogspot.com

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Wow what an interesting thing for me to read today. I have just survived cancer with radiation, prior to this I have been fighting gum disease for years, and have lost many teeth already, I have a partial plate for my bottom and needed to get the medal ones because the plastic ones never fit right. I agree with all you say, they cause such wear and tear on the other teeth and finding someone to make a good pair is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Today I went to the dentist because since radiaton and loss of salivia I am having trouble with my teeth again. He told me there is a new plastic partial now available and would like to make me a set of them. I am going to try he showed me how they are flexible, that was a problem for me with the other plastic ones because they broke so easily. I broke several just putting them in the sink to brush my teeth, or biting something hard. I am no a candidate for implants with the bone loss I have, so any info on how to find a good person to make a good set of partials is appreciated. Sorry about the ignorant folks who dismissed your views obviously they as most dentists have full sets of teeth and do no realize what we partial wearers go thru to get a set to use daily go thru. It is very hard to find someone as you said who knows how to make the mold and then find a lab to make them and get a proper fit, I was diagnosed with trigeminial neuralgia which is a painful condition and it was not that at all but a poorly fitting set of dentures.
Thanks for your imput I appreciate what you have to say and don't let anyone quiet you, folks like myself need to hear your experience and views.
Denimite@verizon.net

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Arvid--

Thanks SO MUCH for educating us. Your information needs to get wider exposure, for sure.

May I suggest--for starters-- that you send a similar letter to the "Health" editors of the WASHINGTON POST and/or NEW YORK TIMES?

Your info needs to get out. Keep trying, and God bless you for sharing the story.

Warm regards, Barbara

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The following is in regards to flexible partials.
If the flexible partial made out of thermoplastic material will be replacing back teeth, the lack of metal stops and clasps that are needed to reduce the stress that is placed on the ridge and tissue while eating might cause you discomfort. In addition, the lack of metal stops and clasps that are needed to stop the partial from settling, in a short time will cause the flexible partial to settle, the denture teeth will loose contact with the opposing dentition and the flexible partial will become a non-functional appliance.
With metal partials, you can even do the following as demonstrated in this video on youtube. www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjhepMj0qsk I’ve been wearing this appliance that restored the vertical with metal onlays for seven years. I remove the appliance twice a day for brushing and since I started wearing it, I had no cavities or gum related issues. However, after dental manufacturers refused to assist me in producing equipment to simplify production and I was unable to find dental technicians to help me construct the appliances, I decided to walk away from the dental industry and left no records on how the appliance was constructed. So far no one was able to figure out how it was made.
Arvid Saunaitis
http://tometalk-erudite.blogspot.com

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The Real Story

Because dental technicians who make partial dentures were forced to work with hazardous materials such as monomers and silica and were the lowest paid in the lab industry, they started to abandon their professions. Hoping to show them a sign of hope, I invented a removable dental device that snaps over the existing teeth and covers the worn or discolored dentition giving the patient a perfect smile instantly, watch video
www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjhepMj0qsk
After my breakthrough was published in newspapers, dental journals and was broadcasted on radio and television, it quickly gained popularity among dentists and the public. However, unable to find any help from the dental industry I decided to quit myself. Some people who heard that the appliance is no longer available became emotional as they explained to me that this appliance was the only affordable way to restore their smiles.
Arvid Saunaitis
Former certified dental technician - laboratory owner
http://tometalk-erudite.blogspot.com

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