help with teen w/ type 1 diabetes

I would like to hear from any teens battling this disease. As a caring mom at wits end on how to help my daughter cope and manage her diabetes. very picky eater & would like some suggestions & any comments are welcome and appreciated.
thanks, momof15yr-diabetic,
ps.she is 15 and has type 1 since april 2006 Thanks

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Hi I also have a 14 year old son who has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for the last 4 months. I know how you feel because my son is also a very , very, picky eater and it has been very hard on him. The foods that he should be eating he does not like and the foods that he does eat , he is not suppose to have when he does his glucose levels go very high. My son's glucose levels are usually very low in the morning and take until dinner time to go up. It's hard to talk to people about what I am going through that don't experience diabetes,so it's nice to be able to find people out there who know what I am going through and understand. Please contact me so we can talk more.

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I am no longer a teen with diabetes, but I am still young enough to remember what it was like! I am 28 yrs. old, and have had type 1 diabetes for 22 yrs. Not only am I diabetic, but am now helping my friend, because my godson became diabetic at three (he is 8 now), and I help my brother-in-law because my niece became diabetic at 9 (she is 11 now). It is very hard to be a teenager, esp. a teenage girl, without anything being wrong, but it's even harder when you are diabetic. I remember not wanting any of my friends to know, because I didn't want to be made fun of, or looked at as different. I didn't want to talk to my mom about things like that because I didn't think she would understand, so I kept it too myself, and struggled along by myself. Thankfully my parents took really good care of my diabetes in the early yrs., and taught me the right things to do to manage my diabetes. In my teen years my diabetes became poorly controlled because I tried to act like it did not exist. I just began talking with a social worker about some other medical problems I have, and she told me she had had diabetes for 27 yrs., and her teen years were poorly controlled too. It seems to be a resounding answer from a lot of diabetics. In between hormones reak havic on diabetes, and blood sugars, and uncontrolled blood sugars make you feel lousy and make you emotions more volitale then they already are as a hormonal teen. It is a hard time for everyone involved. Plus as a teen you think you are invincible. You have heard all the horror stories about what diabetes can cause, but you just don't believe it. You just want to be like your friends, and hang out like nothing is wrong with you. And you think that you don't have any complications from your diabetes now, so it just won't happen to you.
The suggestions I have given my brother-in-law as my niece enters her teen yrs., is to try as best as possible to stay active in her life, try to teach her how to control her diabetes while still making herself seem normal (for ex. she can always put her supplies in her purse, and just go to the bathroom to take a shot or check her blood, if she is not comfortable), remember to keep you patience with her because she will only hold more in, if she thinks you are going to blow up at her. The American Diabetes Association offers a website for juvenile diabetics to communicate with other juvenile diabetics in a "safe" environment. When I was a teenager the ADA offered pen pals, so I don't know exactly how safe the site is, as I have no business being on there. You can also try to find a diabetes camp in your area for teenagers, where your daughter could go during the summer. Some of the camps are just day camps, others are week long camps, with diabetes counselors. Either way, those things will not only allow your daughter to know that there are other teens out there like her, it will give her someone to vent to about things she is going through, that will really understand. I hope this helps, and good luck.

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You really hit the nail on the head. It sounds just like what my daughter is going through, thats why I don't know how to help her but your suggestions helped alot. I would love to get her in a camp this summer. You are right she won't talk to me about anything. She hods everything inside and sometimes it feels like she just can't stand me. I know she loves me because I'm her mother but ever since she got diabetes she will not talk to me. I tried to get her to chat with other teens on the JD site and she said she didn't want to talk to them because they were just like her. All they were doing was complaining about having diabetes, and she didn't want to hear other peoples problems. I would love for her to be able to hear from someone like you that has been through it if she would be open to it. She don't know I just started this post. What do you think I should do about asking her that?

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I too have a son 16 yrs old with type 1 diabetes. he was diagnosed just before his 15th birthday. Sam's eating habits were that of a typical teenager as your kids eating is but... as sad as it sounds and is, they have to be different and they have to take responsibility for this awful disease. As I explained it to Sam, you can manage your diabetes and live a great quality of life or you can mismanage it and have a horrible quality of life. Sam did not like his choices but in the end decided he wanted to have a good quality of life. So he eats his veggies (grudgingly) but eats right none-the less and has that occasional, sweet when he wants it. You can read my story at www.sherrymolina.com

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Good morning, my 16 year old daughter doesn't have DM, but she recently was treated for thyroid cancer. She is ok physically, just tired a lot and she used to be the energizer bunny. Her life has changed dramatically, in ways that I didn't expect. She has lost connections with most of her friends. She used to be highly motivated in school, and now I can't get her out of bed in the morning.. She doesn't want to talk to any other teens that have battled cancer---I think it makes her feel too different. She needs to eat less, but she eats more. So although the diseases are different, I feel like I can resonate with the other moms here who are overwhelmed with concern and hope for their teen. Thank you for posting your thoughts and feelings.

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I had to sit down and talk to my 11yr. old niece this past wk. because she has not been taking care of her diabetes, and nothing the Dr. says to her, or her dad says to her seems to be getting through. I had to take an approach that I didn't want to take, but it seems to be working. We talked for quite a while and admitted that she thinks that if she ignores her diabetes, and lies to her Dr. and dad maybe it will go away (she's had it for 2 yrs. so she should know better). She also said that one of the boys at her school has been making fun of her. It is making for a tough situation for her, and it is hard enough to be a normal teen/pre-teen. I asked her if she knows what can happen if she doesn't take care of her diabetes. I was shocked by her answer...she said "yes, death and coma". I asked her if that was all and she told me yes. She was never taught the risks and side effects of uncontrolled diabetes in her diabetes education. The only reason she knows about death and coma is her baby brother died of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes, and she remembers that. So I asked her what she would be willing to give up to make her diabetes go away and have kids stop picking on her. I asked her if she would give up her arm, or her leg. She told me no, and I was crazy, she would just keep what she already had. Then I explained to her if she didn't take care of herself she could lose her arms, legs, eyesight, have a hrt. attack, etc. I got the statistics to show her how many diabetics go blind each yr., and how many diabetic amputations are done each yr. I also explained to here that if she wishes to have kids (naturally not by adoption) that the only way that would be possible would be to control her diabetes. I was shocked that they are no longer telling these things to new diabetic children, or their families. Neither my niece or her dad knew about these things. Since then she has done much better. I just thought I would throw these things out there if it might help anyone else on the site.

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I luckily came across your post, and it came to my attention to reply. I have had type 1 diabetes for 13 years now, and I am 16 now. Diabetes as a teenager is not an easy task, and I'm lucky I had diabetes from a young age to be prepared for my teenage years. And even now I have my ups and downs.

I feel for your daughter, I think many teenagers feel like her, and having been diagnosed recently does not help. I am positive about my diabetes. My mother has always told me from a young age, that I'm lucky still. That I'm not a starving child in Africa, and that I still have all my limbs and that I can do everything any other teenager that doesn't have diabetes.

But it is annoying me a lot about how many of my friends act toward my diabetes. Nobody seems to understand it, even care about it.
I find it a bit sad that nobody really is interested in my diabetes, and its even worse when you see your friends complaining about the smallest problems whilst I'm on the other side struggling with a low blood sugar.

The worst thing is that people seem to think it's just 'weird' when I get a low. And I HATE it when I'm with some new people I met and I get a high or low, and well, in the end I do have to let them know. And then I have to start my 20-minute talk on diabetes because most just think I need to eat some sugar to control it, when it's really the opposite!

I'm in my last year of schooling, and stress and hormones make it hard for me. I care about my health, but I still think that my diabetes can be much better. It could be, if I didn't have friends, school and all other things in life to worry about. That is why I am excited to become an adult, it will become much easier.


Now that I'm getting older I have all the pressures of alcohol and staying up late at night. I have to control it as best as possible. I could give you many suggestions if you would like, I would like to help you and your daughter.

Please contact me, or let your daughter know to contact me. I'm not a person to complain about my diabetes, I try to be positive about it most of the time.

I would much appreciate hearing from you and how your daughter is going. :)

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I read your post this morning. I'm no longer a teen but was diagnosed when I was 12. I went through those teen years. I know how difficult it can be. I didn't really accept being a diabetic. I didn't want to be different from my friends. I wanted to eat what everyone else was. I didn't like having to stop what I was doing to check my sugars or eat.

My parents were very good about making me do the right things while I was home, but when I wasn't I did what ever I felt like doing. I was hospitalized too many times to count with DKA. My doctors and my parents were fed up with my attitude. They explained about all the complications that could happen with diabetes and uncontrolled blood sugars. But I didn't believe it would ever happen to me. Now that I'm 37 I have my share of problems. I got an ulcer on the bottom of one of my feet and ended up having surgery because it did not heal for a long time. I ended up on crutches for close to six months before it completely healed. Now my circulation is good in both feet but I feel as though I have on wet socks all the time. I have gasteopresis and nueropathy in my arms and my legs.

It took me a long time before I realized what I was doing to myself and that these problems were basically my own fault. I have been in comas that they didn't know if I would come out of. I have kidney problems that almost ended up with dialysis. Fortunately I always recovered even when they didn't think I would.

My advice is to let your daughter know that it is alright to be different. That by taking care of her diabetes she will be able to be just like her friends. What she needs to understand is that her friends care about her. And if they are true friends they will try to help her do what she needs to do. They will be more understanding if they can find out and be able to learn with her. If I can do anything to help explain to her feel free to contact me at babee1971@yahoo.com. Best of luck to you both.

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my baby was diagnosed with type 1 at 17 months that was August 27, 2008. It is very hard sometime to try to keep her blood sugar under control. I give her two shots every morning and she get her insulin (sliding scale) if she needs it and a shot at 6 every day. we went to the doctor in Feb. 2009 to see if things was getting better. Well the doctor add that extra insulin which make three. So my husband and I meet with the nutritionist to help to us with the food she eat. Its getting better but its HARD. we go back to the doctor in June I will keep you updated.
Your not alone. Let me know how your daughter is doing. temekiabatiste@yahoo.com

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I'm wondering if anyone can tell me the best things for my daughter to be eating. She was diagnosed almost a month ago, we are trying to get her blood sugar in normal range. It seems like when she has a snack of a fiber bar and yogurt her next check will be in normal range.

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well instead of all the chips, crackers, candy i used to eat all the time i have started eating things like sandwich meat and cheese for snacks because those are both low in carbs and for meals i eat lots of meat to make up for the foods that are high in carbs but i always remember to include foods like fruits and veggies to make sure i don't get sick from not eating enough carbs ( i did that already) . to treat my lows i eat things like bananas, or bread because they break down fast, also juices are really good for raising bg. normally people think that chocolate is a good thing for me to eat when im low but ive found that it takes it alot longer to break down than the others ive mentioned. i hope this helps you find some foods for your daughter to eat :)

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Hey my name is Jasmine I am 16 years old and I have had diabetes since I was 5 years old. This is hard for me to talk about because even though I have had it for so long my blood sugar is really high all the time. I do know what your daughter is going through I need help even now with it. I didn't start giving my own shots until I was 15 nd once again I am 16 now. If your daughter wants a friend or someone to talk to tell her to email me. I would like friend that also know what I'm going through.

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I wanted to say a few more things. It is hard at school and even at home. When I meet new friends I have to give the lecture and they seem bored. I HATE it when people think that it is sugar that I need when it is the exact opposite and I am not one to complain I try to stay positive even though it is hard at times. There was one time I had to do an essay for school and guess what it was on..... HEALTH and since my teacher knew I had diabetes she asked me to do it on that. I said that I didn't want to because people get bored with it but she kinda made me do it. So when it was the day to present she had me go first when everyone was paying attention I told them my story and my grandmas story...(if you want to know more contact me) anyways when I was done everyone clapped which is kinda expected but since english is my last class of the day so after school I was walking home and these four girls that were in my class cme up to me and asked me a bunch of questions about me and my diabetes I was amazed.

I have been in the hospital well over 10 times my whole life and more than 6 times this past year. Before those girls asked me those questions no one cared. When I went low people thought it was weird same as when I went high. I am usually high all the time now. I have a four year old brother that is a diabetic he has had it for two years. He is always low as with me I am the opposite. Anyways please tell your daughter to come talk to me I would love to. I would also like to know how she is doing :)

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I know its really hard to deal with it and people have no idea about it so they don't care.Type 1 usually develops in children when the pancreas no longer produces insulin.
Insulin is the hormone responsible for carrying nutrients from carbohydrates into the cells. Without insulin, the cells don't get the energy they need to function properly.
we have to educate our children about the problems of Diabetes…I find an interesting way to educate our kids which is through medical comic books as they are attractive interesting and explaining various diseases in efficient manner so they will learn it quite easily. Visit this link for more details.


http://www.kidzcomics.com/medical-graphic-novels-and-books-explaining-disea ses-to-kids/medikidz-explain-diabetes.html

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