Little white bumps under skin on hand & heel??

I have always had a weird thing and now I'm wondering if it is common in EDS patients.... When I put weight on my foot or bend my hand back, these strange white bumps emerge under the skin on my heel or the heel of my hand. They are not hard and my guess would be that they are some kind of fat deposits.

As a child, I told my doctor that the bumps appeared when I bent my hand back and he said, "Then don't do that." (The first in a long line of soooooo helpful doctors!) When I tore my calf muscle more recently, the physical therapist freaked OUT at the sight of the bumps and said she had never seen anything like them.

Anyone??

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OK, weird. I was just randomly researching EDS qualifications and happened on this page: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466834_4

It lists one of the symptoms as "subcutaneous spheroids" which may or may not be what I'm talking about. Would love to know if other people's spheroids are the same as mine!

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Paula, I'd say that you WERE experiencing an EDS symptom. With me, the bumps (yes, small white bumps under the skin) used to appear every summer when I spent significant time outside. I didn't think much of it until I heard a few years ago that one of the youngsters (age 6, great at gymnastics) in my extended family was having problems with lots of these subcutaneous spheroids on her buttocks, as well as hive breakouts. When I heard that the dermatologist said he'd never seen this in so young a child I did ask that my EDS-III be mentioned in her medical chart and asked her mom (my niece) to give the kid lots of Vitamin C, which apparently helped although not sure if by "help" it was relief of the unexplained hives breakout or the strange white bumps. Could it be that wherever in the body the skin is stressed (either by sun in my case or the probable falls of my great-niece on her buttocks during gymnastics) the subcutaneous spheroids emerge? But you are not alone with this one! And I cringe when I think back on my life at the statements of invalidation that I heard about my many "strange" symptoms. I feel so empowered by knowing the EDS diagnosis and using the internet to check out any "obscure" symptom I might have.

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NORMAL, EXPECTED signs of EDS. I get new ones every once in a while...maybe 3-4x/year. Most are on hands, feet, and I have one in my mouth inside my cheek, and one on my stomach. They aren't anything to worry about...just a collagen disorder thing. Don't worry about them. If you read the EDNF.org website, at the place where they have the signs/symptoms of each of the types of EDS, you'll find these talked about. Check out that website...it's a good place to learn all about the disorder. God Bless!

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Peoplepaula-

The ones on your feet are called Piezogenic pedal papules! I have them on both heels. You should google them to read about it. I started having a lot of pain on my heels and noticed them. The pain comes and goes. When they're bad, I wrap them with sports tape for a while to relieve some of the pressure on them. Lots of people have them, but i read that they are asymptomatic in most people, unless you have EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME.... They can cause pain. Of course, right? They are little fatty deposits that break through because of faulty, weak connective tissue. Sometimes, being overweight can cause them in "normies". From what I've read there is no treatment for them. If they don't hurt, ignore them. If they are causing pain when you put weight on your feet, you could try wrapping them like I do. Good luck! Aren't they pretty?!?! :)

Unhinged

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Hmmm.... I'm not we're talking about the same things. These are never painful or associated with pain, and they do not come and go. They are not there until I bend my hand back (or put weight on my foot) then they show up - about 15 or 20 small bumps. It has been this way my whole life and they have never appeared anywhere else on my body......

Thanks for the responses!!

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Peoplepaula-

The pain comes and goes, but the bumps are always there when I put pressure or weight on my feet. I have twenty or so on the sides and back of each heel. I guess they are not painful for most people. Not sure if yours are the same things, but if you google "piezogenic pedal papules", and hit "images", pictures of them will come up and you will know. I've probably had them my whole life, but didn't notice them until they started hurting. Mine feel like they want to burst sometimes, and really hurt. Other times, they don't bother me a bit! Basically, they look like small white marbles under my skin. If they are the same thing, I'm glad yours don't hurt. Hope it stays that way! Anyway- check out the pictures online.

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First of all, google images is a terrible idea when you're looking up medical stuff. I did google "piezogenic pedal papules" and THAT is what I have. (Unfortunately, it's not what ppl in a few of the pictures have, bc some of those photos were ROUGH.)

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ive always had those, they come and go but ive been getting them for a while. they never hurt at all. just funny looking. my mom has them too, and shes who i got my EDS from so..

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Well, I guess "google images" worked enough to tell you that you have "Piezogenic Pedal papules" like I thought. You're welcome!

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Wowser. I could have found out I had EDS a long time ago if I had only known what these bumps were. I wrote a blog post about it....

http://www.everydaysyndrome.com/2011/08/thanks-lot-doctor-robinson.html

Thank you so much, especially to Unhinged!!

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I freaked out a little when I saw them on my wrist too. As I got older it became a good luck ritual in my drama class for everyone to rum my "air bubbles" before they went on stage. But now I am starting to have pain with them. I never knew they were a symptom of EDS. But I guess I should have known.

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