How many cc's can your IP hold without leaking?

When I saw my IP surgeon at 10 weeks out, he wanted me to be producing no more than 500 cc's at one time, but eventually stretching to 1000 (I think?).

This afternoon, I emptied 650. That was 1.5 hours after my last cath. I felt the familiar pinching and so decided to "go" again.

Does 650 seem like a lot?

Report post

9 replies. Join the discussion

Girl....what are u drinking...650 ccs in a hour and a half!! Wow....maybe it's just me but I think I drink a lot of water and I do about 450 - 500 ccs every 4 hrs. At least u know your kidneys are working good!

Report post

I had two huge mugs of coffee this morning, and 64 ounces of water.

Report post

I cath about every 6 hours, give to take. I normally get 600 to 750 cc's. There have been times I get 1000.

Report post

Urine output varies tremendously depending, obviously, on fluid intake. A current textbook of physiology gives a figure of 1400 ml per day. Persons with an IP should probably aim for a slightly higher daily output in order to minimize the risk of stone formation in the pouch and kidneys. Although the IP can often hold 1,000 ml, that's more than the average normal bladder holds before the urge to void.
My concern about a large pouch volume is the risk of urine backing up into the kidneys, which my urologist has cautioned me about. I aim for a 4-6 hour cycle and the output is usually 600-700 ml. with little or no leaking. I have slept through my alarm a couple of times and accumulated more than 1,000 ml, with some leakage -- sometimes a lot! (My "alarm" is a kitchen timer, which isn't as loud as an alarm clock and doesn't usually awaken my wife.)
Medicare provides up to 200 single-use catheters per month. That tells me that they expect us to catheterize about 6 times per day or every four hours.
I addressed the issue of stone formation in my weekly blog, drphilgindianapouch.blogspot.com.

Report post

Urine output varies tremendously depending, obviously, on fluid intake. A current textbook of physiology gives a figure of 1400 ml per day. Persons with an IP should probably aim for a slightly higher daily output in order to minimize the risk of stone formation in the pouch and kidneys. Although the IP can often hold 1,000 ml, that's more than the average normal bladder holds before the urge to void.
My concern about a large pouch volume is the risk of urine backing up into the kidneys, which my urologist has cautioned me about. I aim for a 4-6 hour cycle and the output is usually 600-700 ml. with little or no leaking. I have slept through my alarm a couple of times and accumulated more than 1,000 ml, with some leakage -- sometimes a lot! (My "alarm" is a kitchen timer, which isn't as loud as an alarm clock and doesn't usually awaken my wife.)
Medicare provides up to 200 single-use catheters per month. That tells me that they expect us to catheterize about 6 times per day or every four hours.
I addressed the issue of stone formation in my weekly blog, drphilgindianapouch.blogspot.com.

Report post

My uro likes me to keep mine under 500 cc's. I get 600 to 700 cc's quite often and have gone to 925 cc's. After a surgery I had a lot of pressure in the recovery room and asked to cath. Two hours later I asked again and I got around 1275 cc's, the nurse had to use two graduates. My pouch could have ruptured, I was not happy with the surgeon not putting in a foley catheter. I hope to never have another surgery but if I do I will insist on a foley to a bag.

Report post

Are you serious???? That's insane! I could barely move after my surgery....and they expected you to cath immediately?

Report post

It was after a biopsy of a ureter and a nurse did it for me while I was laying on a recovery room bed.

Report post

oh geeze, I thought you meant THE surgery, R/C!!!!

Report post

This discussion is closed to replies. We close all discussions after 90 days.

If there's something you'd like to discuss, click below to start a new discussion.

Things you can do

Support BCAN

Help the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network reach its goals and support people like yourself by making a donation today.

Donate to the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

Discussion topics

Walk for Bladder Cancer May 3rd

Walk for Bladder Cancer

Resources from BCAN

BCAN on Facebook

Like the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network on Facebook

Community leaders