Atheletes foot and my stoma?

Can I use an over-the-counter non-prescription anti fungal body powder around my stoma that is primarily for athlete's foot fungus? Like Tenactin for example. I went to three pharmacies today looking for specific anti-fungal body powder for use around a stoma and the pharmacists seemed dumbfounded. None knew anything about stomas or this kind of fungus (assuming that's what I have.) None would recommend the use of anti fungal body powder that says, "for athletes foot" either so home I am with no powder. The skin around my puckered little red bastage (his proper name) where the inner adhesive ring goes is inflamed and red and it itches like crazy. I normally use a healing powder (Ammens Original Medicated Formula) with every application of a new bag but this isn't working to make the redness or rash or whatever it is go away lately. I called my ostomy nurse but it's Saturday and so she's probably on the golf course with my URO or in a casino until Monday. I don't want to wait until Monday if possible. I know my BCAN family will have the answer I seek. Why do we even need these doctors and medical types? We've got each other. Right? Luv, Dr. K. (I'm not a real doctor but I play on on BCAN. If I were a real doctor, I'd probably know what to do or would write myself a prescription or something.)

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I spelled "Athlete's" wrong but I'm too lazy and itchy to delete and change it. You get the idea.
Athlete: Someone usually with balls of some kind or another who is usually scratching his or her fungus-infected feet.

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Absolutely you can. A lot of us have used Desenex and MicroGuard. I even used Lotrimin cream once when I couldn't get Desenex. One thing to keep in mind as told to me by my favorite ostomy nurse. Don't use antifungal powder all the time because you will become immune to it after a while. Use it only when you have the rash and then for one "pouch change" after the rash is gone.

Pat aka Mom

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Also...here is the "rash routine" she gave me. Do this every other day till one pouch change after the rash is gone. Remove old pouch and wash skin with vinegar/water mix. If you have to use adhesive remover (not necessary unless there is a build up of adhesive) wash with Ivory soap then rinse thoroughly. Dry completely using a hair drier. You want no moisture under the pouch. Rub in the anti fungal powder then wipe off with a tissue till no more remains. Stick on a new pouch. Repeat every other day as mentioned above.

Pat aka Mom

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Yeah, that's what my ostomy nurse said, too. I forget the brand I got, some over the counter athlete's foot powder. Since you had such a rewarding time with the pharmacists, why not try the cosmetic department next? Ask the lady there for a blusher brush thick enough to dust off powder around a stoma. Of course, you might luck out and get somebody whose husband or son or daughter or whatever also has a bag and will put the pharmacists to shame with her knowledge...

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Thanks a bunch. I hope my stoma doesn't get athlete's foot, turn black, and fall off.

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Katuaha, hope your stoma doesn't turn into a foot : then you will have one appendage that is a foot :)

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Joyus...Katuha would be delighted to have an appendage that is a foot!

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Katuaha,

I was told by my doctor that it is not advisable to use it at all around your stoma, under the wafer. It is not approved for that use so has not been tested. I would not want to do this since the stoma is directly connected to your kidneys so you have to be very careful with that. Also, the prescription powder is much finer ground and will be less of a problem with the appliance losing the adhesive, causing it to fall off.

Obviously if you have a terrible problem now, the use of the over the counter powder could be used for a short period of time until you can get a prescription of Nysatin (Nystop), not expensive and it is a common problem so is easy to get once you see or call the ostomy nurse.

Good luck, Paris

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Dear Dr., After I tired of home remedies(powders, creams, vinegar voodo, etc.), I went to a Dermatologist who confirmed my so called fungus was actually "contact dermatitis". It has little chance of ever healing under the wafer without proper medication. He prescribed a product called Luxiq which is a foam substance in a pressurized can. It kept me from jumping off the nearest bridge, as I was about to go crazy with itching and leaks. It is magic! I'm a doctor, like you, and our kind sometimes are subject to misdiagnosis and subsequent malpractice. Athlete's foot powder won't do s....t for contact dermatitis. Roybean

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Since we are talking about redness around the stoma problems, and you are getting such good suggestions, I wonder if I can talk about my ongoing battle with redness but without the itch. It looks o.k. when I take the barrier off, but after the shower the peristomal area turns pink or red. It hardly ever itches, no leaks, and feels fine. I tried the vinegar/water solution. I am using the hairdryer. I am putting stoma powder on and caking it with skin prep. I also put a little ring of the Brava Protective Shield around before I put the Barrier on. Very frustrating. Maybe a trip to the skin doctor would help me. I just worry about wasting my time there, and not getting any helpful answers. This community is most of the time more helpful than the Dr.'s office.

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Any ostomy nurses out there who can tell us how to visually tell the difference between a fungus rash and contact dermatitis? I'm going to email our nurse and ask her. Thanks for bringing this up...

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Only 7 more inches to go and I'll have that foot. I'm not holding my breath (or anything else) though. If I had an extra appendage that was a foot long (or a 4-hour erection), I'd immediately call Ripley's Believe It Or Else after some careful handling, photos, and celebration with my closest friends, of course. Not going to happen but thanks for the thought ... that I won't be able to get out of my head for a few days.... if ever.

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So, it's somewhere between "athlete's foot stuff works" and "athlete's foot stuff doesn't work?" I'm going to the hardware store to get some sandpaper. A good sanding of the red areas and then an application of 93 octane gasoline should do the trick I think. I hear gas is really good for killing fungus. We have some good old Aunt Jemima's pancake flower powder. That stuff when mixed with moss from the North side of a willow tree will heal most anything according to my deceased 103-year-old Indian Grandmother's legendary traditional cure-all recipe. I'll add some water and then use the hair dryer before the bag goes on and see what happens. At least my stoma will get the chance to taste pancakes and gas one time before he falls off. If you don't hear from me again, you'll have to imagine what happened I guess. See you on the other side.

Thanks for all of your advice, really, truly, actually.

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My ostomy nurse told me that contact dermatitis is usually smooth and red whereas a fungal infection has red bumps that form in a "satellite" pattern...expanding out from the center area towards the outer edge of the adhesive area or past. Sometimes the bumps will become open and weeping. I always have a little bit of redness under the adhesive that does seem to get redder in the shower but my nurse said not to worry, that it is normal and my skin is just reacting to the hot water given that it is always a little irritated by the barrier.

Regarding Nystatin, I was prescribed Nystatin and even fluconazole by an ostomy nurse for a nasty fungal infection but neither worked. The next ostomy nurse I saw explained that Nystatin and fluconazole are primarily for candida. There are numerous fungi that can cause infections and so she told me to use the OTC powder because they cover a broader range of fungi. That worked for me.

Good luck, Katuha!

Pat

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Patbfit: Terrific post. Thank you so much. Bob has been using Reliamed ostomy powder that I got while making a recent order and giving in to the urge toward more, no less. I think I'll have him use the drugstore OTC stuff I had previously got, so I'd be ready for the Dread Fungus Infection. Sounds alot worse than it apparently is. "Fungus" always sounded like "Forever" to me....

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Katuha, you are a hoot!! My son's ostomy nurse used 2% Desenex this past Wed when she changed his bag. You have to ensure you dust off any excess before applying your bag. I use a makeup (blush) brush that someone on this site suggested but the nurse just used her gloved fingers. The rash was better just 2 days later when we had to change the bag again due to a leak. I'm sure you will gets lots of other suggestions on this site. I'm thrilled with the access we have to my son's ostomy nurses - they are fantastic!!!
Take care & good luck - Vicki

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Cameron...Thank you...just keep in mind that you do not want to use the powder all the time, just when needed. Less is more : ) The adhesive sticks best to clean, dry skin.

Pat

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Keep this informative string of comments going. So far, I have not had a problem like the Chief is describing.

I am a strong advocate of changing the barrier every other day, and I have used the 25% vinegar treatment for washing the peristomal skin, with the exception that I follow that with a clear water rinse. I remove my detachable bag (I use the two piece system) a couple of times a day to rinse it out with tap water, and wipe the barrier clean of any accumulated mucous at that time. One has to work fast. I do it in the morning before breakfast, with a towel in front of me to prevent urine squirts getting on the floor or wash basin, and I do it during my daily shower.

Any red looking areas of skin around the stoma observed when changing the barrier, I treat with stoma powder, but this is usually not necessary. I do not use any skin prep products. Any remaining adhesive on my skin I remove by rubbing it with my finger until it rolls up and comes off. Dusting with stoma powder (which is pectin) usually shows up any remaining adhesive.

As a veterinarian, I have no experience using athlete's food medicine on peristomal areas, but my instinct tells me it might not be a good idea. I would check with my ostomy nurse, my urology department, or a representative from the company that manufactures my bag, in my own case Hollister. Experience of other people who posted here is certainly worth noting.

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It WAS an ostomy nurse who told me to use the OTC anti fungal powder and was the one who said that Nystatin (prescription powder) did not cover many different varieties of fungi. So called "athlete's foot/jock itch" creams and powders are simply anti fungal preparations and have many uses beyond just athlete's foot. Two of my DILs have been told to use them on their babies' bottoms to cure diaper rash. MicroGuard was the powder I used that finally cleared up my rash. If you call any one of the ostomy product manufacturers they will tell you to use whatever brand it is that they sell.

This is a very simple solution to a very common problem. U of M hospital ostomy nurses tell patients to use Desenex and they used it on me when I was there. Let's not turn this into more than it needs to be. If anyone is unsure about what the rash is they should consult an ostomy nurse. I can promise you that the doctors will not have an answer...lol.

Pat

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Good info, Pat. If you say so, I believe it. In fact, most of the recommendations you have given in the past I follow. How does one know when they have a fungal infection of the stoma or skin surrounding it?

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